Results for 'Consciousness and Neuroscience'

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Consciousness and neuroscience.Francis Crick & Christof Koch - 1998 - Cerebral Cortex.
  2. Some thoughts on consciousness and neuroscience.Christof Koch & Francis Crick - 2000 - In Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.), The New Cognitive Neurosciences: 2nd Edition. MIT Press.
  3.  28
    Brain, consciousness and disorders of consciousness at the intersection of neuroscience and philosophy.Michele Farisco - 2019 - Dissertation, Uppsala University
    The present dissertation starts from the general claim that neuroscience is not neutral, with regard to theoretical questions like the nature of consciousness, but it needs to be complemented with dedicated conceptual analysis. Specifically, the argument for this thesis is that the combination of empirical and conceptual work is a necessary step for assessing the significant questions raised by the most recent study of the brain. Results emerging from neuroscience are conceptually very relevant in themselves but, notwithstanding (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Ethics and Neuroscience: Protecting Consciousness.Arran Gare - 2022 - In P. López-Silva & L. Valera (eds.), Protecting the Mind. Ethics of Science and Technology Assessment. Cham.: Springer. pp. 31-40.
    The Hippocratic Oath is a code of ethics defining correct behaviour by physicians they are required to commit themselves to before being accepted into the profession. It was the first code of ethics for any profession. While originating in Ancient Greece, it subsequently evolved, but the current code still embodies many of the core injunctions of the original code. The most widely accepted current form is the 2006 The Declaration of Geneva by the World Medical Association to be taken before (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Consciousness and the neurosciences: Philosophical and theoretical issues.Ilya B. Farber & Patricia S. Churchland - 1995 - In Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.), The Cognitive Neurosciences. MIT Press.
  6. Nietzsche, consciousness, and dynamic cognitive neuroscience.Rex Welshon - 2015 - In Manuel Dries & P. J. E. Kail (eds.), Nietzsche on Mind and Nature. Oxford University Press UK.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  7. Consciousness and the brain: Do we need a first-person neuroscience?G. Northoff - 2000 - Consciousness and Cognition 9 (2):S71 - S72.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8.  12
    Consciousness and brain mechanisms: Epistemological investigations between phenomenology and clinical neuroscience.Davide Perrotta - 2021 - Rivista Internazionale di Filosofia e Psicologia 12 (1):31-43.
    : This paper investigates epistemological differences in the cognitive neuroscientific and phenomenological approaches to outstanding questions in psychiatry. We argue that clinical neuroscience provides scientific explanation in line with a mechanistic approach and describe several examples from computational approaches that illustrate what research on neural processing can tell us about psychiatric diseases. By contrast, phenomenology offers complex descriptions of experiential phenomena. Through a discussion of executive function and the related construct of impulsivity, we show that both cognitive neuroscience (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9.  36
    Philosophy and Neuroscience: A Ruthlessly Reductive Account.J. Bickle - 2003 - Kluwer Academic Publishers.
    Philosophy and Neuroscience: A Ruthlessly Reductive Account is the first book-length treatment of philosophical issues and implications in current cellular and molecular neuroscience. John Bickle articulates a philosophical justification for investigating "lower level" neuroscientific research and describes a set of experimental details that have recently yielded the reduction of memory consolidation to the molecular mechanisms of long-term potentiation (LTP). These empirical details suggest answers to recent philosophical disputes over the nature and possibility of psycho-neural scientific reduction, including the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   175 citations  
  10.  89
    Consciousness and digestion: Sartre and Neuroscience.Hazel E. Barnes - 2005 - Sartre Studies International 11 (1-2):117-132.
    While Sartre scholars cannot fairly be described as being opposed to science, they have, for the most part, stayed aloof. The field of psychology, of course, has been an exception. Sartre himself felt compelled to present his own existential psychoanalysis by marking the parallels and differences between his position and traditional approaches, particularly the Freudian. The same is true with respect to his concept of bad faith and of emotional behavior. Scholars have followed his lead with richly productive results. But (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  6
    Consciousness and Digestion Sartre and Neuroscience.Hazel E. Barnes - 2005 - Sartre Studies International 11 (1-2):117-132.
    While Sartre scholars cannot fairly be described as being opposed to science, they have, for the most part, stayed aloof. The field of psychology, of course, has been an exception. Sartre himself felt compelled to present his own existential psychoanalysis by marking the parallels and differences between his position and traditional approaches, particularly the Freudian. The same is true with respect to his concept of bad faith and of emotional behavior. Scholars have followed his lead with richly productive results. But (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  12.  59
    Consciousness and digestion Sartre and neuroscience.Hazel E. Barnes - 2005 - Sartre Studies International 11 (s 1-2):117-132.
    While Sartre scholars cannot fairly be described as being opposed to science, they have, for the most part, stayed aloof. The field of psychology, of course, has been an exception. Sartre himself felt compelled to present his own existential psychoanalysis by marking the parallels and differences between his position and traditional approaches, particularly the Freudian. The same is true with respect to his concept of bad faith and of emotional behavior. Scholars have followed his lead with richly productive results. But (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  13.  22
    Consciousness and emotion: review of Jaak PankseppsAffective Neuroscience'. [REVIEW]Douglas F. Watt - 1999 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 6 (6-7):6-7.
    [opening paragraph]: Consciousness and emotion are ancient topics, both as old as culture, yet still in their scientific infancy, slowly emerging into full respectability after decades of systematic neglect by science. Despite a recent modest resurgence of interest, emotion remains perhaps the least understood subject -- relative to its importance in human life -- in the whole of neuroscience. This is probably overdetermined. It may be in part a hangover from Lange-James perspectives in which emotion was largely reduced (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  14.  15
    The Neurology of Consciousness: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuropathology edited by Steven Laureys and Giulio Tononi.Edward F. Kelly - 2012 - Journal of Scientific Exploration 26 (3).
    This information-packed volume, without doubt a landmark event in the developing neuroscientific study of consciousness, deserves the attention of anyone interested in this subject. It is a sequel and companion to an earlier collection, The Boundaries of Consciousness: Neurobiology and Neuropathology, also edited by Steven Laureys (2005), which contains the proceedings of a 2004 conference sponsored by the Association for the Scientific Study of Consciousness (ASSC). Published initially as a special issue of Progress in Brain Research (volume (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Primacy of Consciousness and Enactive Imagination. Review of Waking, Dreaming, Being: Self and Consciousness in Neuroscience, Meditation and Philosophy by Evan Thompson.E. Solomonova - 2015 - Constructivist Foundations 10 (2):267-270.
    Upshot: This interdisciplinary work draws on phenomenology, Indian philosophy, Tibetan Buddhism, cognitive neurosciences and a variety of personal and literary examples of conscious phenomena. Thompson proposes a view of consciousness and self as dynamic embodied processes, co-dependent with the world. According to this view, dreaming is a process of spontaneous imagination and not a delusional hallucination. This work aims at laying the ground for systematic neurophenomenological investigation of first-person experience.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  12
    Finding Consciousness: The Neuroscience, Ethics, and Law of Severe Brain Damage.Walter Sinnott-Armstrong (ed.) - 2016 - Oxford University Press USA.
    The prominent contributors provide background information, survey the issues and positions, and take controversial stands from a wide variety of perspectives, including neuroscience and neurology, law and policy, and philosophy and ethics.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17.  35
    Waking, Dreaming, Being: Self and Consciousness in Neuroscience, Meditation, and Philosophy.Evan Thompson & Stephen Batchelor - 2014 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    A renowned philosopher of the mind, also known for his groundbreaking work on Buddhism and cognitive science, Evan Thompson combines the latest neuroscience research on sleep, dreaming, and meditation with Indian and Western philosophy of the mind, casting new light on the self and its relation to the brain. Thompson shows how the self is a changing process, not a static thing. When we are awake we identify with our body, but if we let our mind wander or daydream, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   71 citations  
  18.  24
    Making the unconscious conscious, and vice versa: A bi-directional bridge between neuroscience/cognitive science and psychotherapy?Paul Grobstein - 2005 - Cortex. Special Issue 41 (5):663-668.
  19.  7
    Changing minds: mind, consciousness, and identity in Patañjali's Yoga--sūtra and cognitive neuroscience.Michele Marie Desmarais - 2008 - Delhi: Motilal Banarsidass Publishers.
    This book by Dr. Desmarais is by all means a positive contribution in the field of Yoga, Indology and cognitive neurosciences. It covers Eastern and Western, ancient and modern, religion and metaphysics, psychology and epistemology, as well as the cultural heritage for these. The book is arranged in six chapters using our common concept of show as a metaphysical stage: getting ready for the show; entering the theatre; taking the stage; all the world as stage; following the plot; thickening of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  20.  28
    Integrating experiential–phenomenological methods and neuroscience to study neural mechanisms of pain and consciousness.Donald D. Price, James J. Barrell & Pierre Rainville - 2002 - Consciousness and Cognition 11 (4):593-608.
    Understanding the nature of pain at least partly depends on recognizing its inherent first person epistemology and on using a first person experiential and third person experimental approach to study it. This approach may help to understand some of the neural mechanisms of pain and consciousness by integrating experiential–phenomenological methods with those of neuroscience. Examples that approximate this strategy include studies of second pain summation and its relationship to neural activities and brain imaging-psychophysical studies wherein sensory and affective (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  21.  48
    Integrating experimental-phenomenological methods and neuroscience to study neural mechanisms of pain and consciousness.D. Barrell Price & Rainville J. - 2002 - Consciousness and Cognition 11 (4):593-608.
    Understanding the nature of pain at least partly depends on recognizing its inherent first person epistemology and on using a first person experiential and third person experimental approach to study it. This approach may help to understand some of the neural mechanisms of pain and consciousness by integrating experiential–phenomenological methods with those of neuroscience. Examples that approximate this strategy include studies of second pain summation and its relationship to neural activities and brain imaging-psychophysical studies wherein sensory and affective (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  22. Consciousness and the brain: deciphering how the brain codes our thoughts.Stanislas Dehaene - 2014 - New York, New York: Viking Press.
    A breathtaking look at the new science that can track consciousness deep in the brain How does our brain generate a conscious thought? And why does so much of our knowledge remain unconscious? Thanks to clever psychological and brain-imaging experiments, scientists are closer to cracking this mystery than ever before. In this lively book, Stanislas Dehaene describes the pioneering work his lab and the labs of other cognitive neuroscientists worldwide have accomplished in defining, testing, and explaining the brain events (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   47 citations  
  23. Consciousness, Accessibility, and the Mesh between Psychology and Neuroscience.Ned Block - 2007 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (5):481--548.
    How can we disentangle the neural basis of phenomenal consciousness from the neural machinery of the cognitive access that underlies reports of phenomenal consciousness? We can see the problem in stark form if we ask how we could tell whether representations inside a Fodorian module are phenomenally conscious. The methodology would seem straightforward: find the neural natural kinds that are the basis of phenomenal consciousness in clear cases when subjects are completely confident and we have no reason (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   385 citations  
  24. Geometry, biophysics, and neuroscience: On the quantum nature of life and consciousness in the confluence of the thoughts of Erwin Schrodinger and Hermann Weyl.Manuel Bejar Gallego - 2009 - Pensamiento 65 (246):959-986.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25.  68
    Phenomenal consciousness, access consciousness and self across waking and dreaming: bridging phenomenology and neuroscience.Martina Pantani, Angela Tagini & Antonino Raffone - 2018 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 17 (1):175-197.
    The distinction between phenomenal and access consciousness is central to debates about consciousness and its neural correlates. However, this distinction has often been limited to the domain of perceptual experiences. On the basis of dream phenomenology and neuroscientific findings this paper suggests a theoretical framework which extends this distinction to dreaming, also in terms of plausible neural correlates. In this framework, phenomenal consciousness is involved in both waking perception and dreaming, whereas access consciousness is weakened, but (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26.  39
    Extended Consciousness and Predictive Processing: A Third Wave View.Michael David Kirchhoff & Julian Kiverstein - 2019 - London, UK: Routledge.
    This book is forthcoming in Routledge. Here is the barest sketch of our aims: -/- We have two aims in this book. First, we aim to persuade you that conscious experience is sometimes realised by cycles of embodied and world-involving engagement. Second, we aim to persuade you that it is possible to develop and defend the thesis of extended consciousness through the increasingly powerful predictive processing theory developed in cognitive neuroscience.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   27 citations  
  27. Consciousness and morality.Joshua Shepherd & Neil Levy - forthcoming - In Uriah Kriegel (ed.), Oxford Handbook of the Philosophy of Consciousness. Oxford University Press.
    It is well known that the nature of consciousness is elusive, and that attempts to understand it generate problems in metaphysics, philosophy of mind, psychology, and neuroscience. Less appreciated are the important – even if still elusive – connections between consciousness and issues in ethics. In this chapter we consider three such connections. First, we consider the relevance of consciousness for questions surrounding an entity’s moral status. Second, we consider the relevance of consciousness for questions (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  28.  90
    Consciousness and Mental Life.Daniel N. Robinson - 2007 - Cambridge University Press.
    In recent decades, issues that reside at the center of philosophical and psychological inquiry have been absorbed into a scientific framework variously identified as "brain science," "cognitive science," and "cognitive neuroscience." Scholars have heralded this development as revolutionary, but a revolution implies an existing method has been overturned in favor of something new. What long-held theories have been abandoned or significantly modified in light of cognitive neuroscience? _Consciousness and Mental Life_ questions our present approach to the study of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  29. Consciousness and cognitive access.Ned Block - 2008 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 108 (1pt3):289-317.
    This article concerns the interplay between two issues that involve both philosophy and neuroscience: whether the content of phenomenal consciousness is 'rich' or 'sparse', whether phenomenal consciousness goes beyond cognitive access, and how it would be possible for there to be evidence one way or the other.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   62 citations  
  30. The cognitive neuroscience of sleep: Neuronal systems, consciousness and learning.J. Allan Hobson & Edward F. Pace-Schott - 2002 - Nature Reviews Neuroscience 3:679-93.
  31.  90
    The investigation of consciousness through phenomenology and neuroscience.Bruce J. MacLennan - 1995 - In Joseph E. King & Karl H. Pribram (eds.), Proceedings Scale in Conscious Experience: Third Appalachian Conference on Behavioral Neurodynamics. Lawrence Erlbaum. pp. 23-43.
    The principal problem of consciousness is how brain processes cause subjective awareness. Since this problem involves subjectivity, ordinary scientific methods, applicable only to objective phenomena, cannot be used. Instead, by parallel application of phenomenological and scientific methods, we may establish a correspondence between the subjective and the objective. This correspondence is effected by the construction of a theoretical entity, essentially an elementary unit of consciousness, the intensity of which corresponds to electrochemical activity in a synapse. Dendritic networks correspond (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  32. Material constitution, the neuroscience of consciousness, and the temporality of experience.Benjamin L. Curtis - 2015 - In Steven Miller (ed.), The Constitution of Phenomenal Consciousness: Toward a science and theory. pp. 433-444.
    In this paper I argue that if a completed neuroscience of consciousness is to be attained, we must give the synchronic and diachronic application conditions for brain states and phenomenal states. I argue that, due to the temporal nature of our experiences, such states must be viewed as being temporally extended events, and illustrate how to give such application conditions using examples of other temporally extended events. However, I also raise some difficulties for the project of giving application (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. Hypnosis and neuroscience: Implications for the altered state debate.Steven Jay Lynn, Irving Kirsch, Josh Knox, Oliver Fassler & Scott O. Lilienfeld - 2007 - In Graham A. Jamieson (ed.), Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oxford University Press. pp. 145-165.
  34. Consciousness: Converging insights from connectionist modeling and neuroscience.Tiago V. Maia & Axel Cleeremans - 2005 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (8):397-404.
    Over the past decade, many findings in cognitive about the contents of consciousness: we will not address neuroscience have resulted in the view that selective what might be called the ‘enabling factors’ for conscious- attention, working memory and cognitive control ness (e.g. appropriate neuromodulation from the brain- stem, etc.). involve competition between widely distributed rep-.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  35. Projective identification and consciousness alteration: A bridge between psychoanalysis and neuroscience?Cristiana Cimino & Antonello Correale - 2005 - International Journal of Psychoanalysis 86 (1):51-60.
  36.  82
    The Role of Conscious Attention in Perception: Immanuel Kant, Alonzo Church, and Neuroscience.Hermann G. W. Burchard - 2011 - Foundations of Science 16 (1):67-99.
    Impressions, energy radiated by phenomena in the momentary environmental scene, enter sensory neurons, creating in afferent nerves a data stream. Following Kant, by our inner sense the mind perceives its own thoughts as it ties together sense data into an internalized scene. The mind, residing in the brain, logically a Language Machine, processes and stores items as coded grammatical entities. Kantian synthetic unity in the linguistic brain is able to deliver our experience of the scene as we appear to see (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  37. Consciousness and the Fallacy of Misplaced Objectivity.Francesco Ellia, Jeremiah Hendren, Matteo Grasso, Csaba Kozma, Garrett Mindt, Jonathan Lang, Andrew Haun, Larissa Albantakis, Melanie Boly & Giulio Tononi - 2021 - Neuroscience of Consciousness 7 (2):1-12.
    Objective correlates—behavioral, functional, and neural—provide essential tools for the scientific study of consciousness. But reliance on these correlates should not lead to the ‘fallacy of misplaced objectivity’: the assumption that only objective properties should and can be accounted for objectively through science. Instead, what needs to be explained scientifically is what experience is intrinsically— its subjective properties—not just what we can do with it extrinsically. And it must be explained; otherwise the way experience feels would turn out to be (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  38.  51
    Consciousness and the Ontology of Properties.Mihretu P. Guta (ed.) - 2019 - New York: Routledge.
    This book aims to show the centrality of a proper ontology of properties in thinking about consciousness. Philosophers have long grappled with what is now known as the hard problem of consciousness, i.e., how can subjective or qualitative features of our experience—such as how a strawberry tastes—arise from brain states? More recently, philosophers have incorporated what seems like promising empirical research from neuroscience and cognitive psychology in an attempt to bridge the gap between measurable mental states on (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39.  9
    Psychology and Neuroscience: Problems of Integration.M. A. Sushchin - 2019 - Russian Journal of Philosophical Sciences 62 (1):89-105.
    This article deals with the question of a proper methodological strategy of interaction between psychology and neuroscience. In recent decades, due to the intensive development of neurosciences, the interaction of the two disciplines has been dominated by the theme of the search for so-called neural correlates of mental phenomena and events. Meanwhile, in recent literature, an opinion has been expressed about the possibility of a genuine integration of psychology and neuroscience. In this work, the author critically examines three (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40. Consciousness and the cerebral hemispheres.Michael S. Gazzaniga - 1995 - In The Cognitive Neurosciences. MIT Press.
  41.  11
    Consciousness in Philosophy and Cognitive Neuroscience.Antti Revonsuo & Matti Kamppinen (eds.) - 1994 - Hillsdale, N.J.: Lawrence Erlbaum.
    Consciousness seems to be an enigmatic phenomenon: it is difficult to imagine how our perceptions of the world and our inner thoughts, sensations and feelings could be related to the immensely complicated biological organ we call the brain. This volume presents the thoughts of some of the leading philosophers and cognitive scientists who have recently participated in the discussion of the status of consciousness in science. The focus of inquiry is the question: "Is it possible to incorporate (...) into science?" Philosophers have suggested different alternatives -- some think that consciousness should be altogether eliminated from science because it is not a real phenomenon, others that consciousness is a real, higher-level physical or neurobiological phenomenon, and still others that consciousness is fundamentally mysterious and beyond the reach of science. At the same time, however, several models or theories of the role of conscious processing in the brain have been developed in the more empirical cognitive sciences. It has been suggested that non-conscious processes must be sharply separated from conscious ones, and that the necessity of this distinction is manifested in the curious behavior of certain brain-damaged patients. This book demonstrates the dialogue between philosophical and empirical points of view. The writers present alternative solutions to the brain-consciousness problem and they discuss how the unification of biological and psychological sciences could thus become feasible. Covering a large ground, this book shows how the philosophical and empirical problems are closely interconnected. From this interdisciplinary exploration emerges the conviction that consciousness can and should be a natural part of our scientific world view. (shrink)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   69 citations  
  42.  26
    Introduction to Symposium on Waking, Dreaming, Being: Self and Consciousness in Neuroscience, Meditation, and Philosophy by Evan Thompson.Christian Coseru - 2016 - Philosophy East and West 66 (3):923-926.
    The papers gathered here were first presented at an “Author Meets Critics” invited session that I organized for the Pacific Division of the American Philosophical Association meeting, held in Vancouver, April 1–5, 2015, on Evan Thompson’s book Waking, Dreaming, Being: Self and Consciousness in Neuroscience, Meditation, and Philosophy. Thompson opened the session with a précis of his book, which was followed by critical commentaries from John Dunne, Owen Flanagan, and Jay Garfield; Jennifer Windt was also an invited contributor (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43. Mind, Cognition, and Neuroscience: A Philosophical Introduction.Benjamin D. Young & Carolyn Dicey Jennings (eds.) - 2021 - Routledge.
    This carefully designed, multi-authored textbook covers a broad range of theoretical issues in cognitive science, psychology, and neuroscience. With accessible language, a uniform structure, and many pedagogical features, Mind, Cognition, and Neuroscience: A Philosophical Introduction is the best high-level overview of this area for an interdisciplinary readership of students. Written specifically for this volume by experts in their fields who are also experienced teachers, the book’s thirty chapters are organized into the following parts: I. Background Knowledge, II. Classical (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  44.  3
    The Problem of Consciousness: The Experiential Approach of Luigi Giussani and the Foundation of the Conception of Consciousness in Neuroscience.Mauro Ceroni - 2022 - Open Journal of Philosophy 12 (4):601-615.
    The relationship between consciousness and brain, subject and body, appears today far away from being elucidated. All attempts to reduce consciousness and subject to the brain end up abolishing the subject, i.e., what is evidently most relevant for each one of us. Luigi Giussani proposes a method to investigate human consciousness based on the analysis of oneself personal experience, verifiable by every human being. He is very attentive to avoiding during the experiential analysis interference of prejudices, ideological (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45. Psychoanalysis Representation and Neuroscience: the Freudian unconscious and the Bayesian brain.Jim Hopkins - 2012 - In A. Fotopoulu, D. Pfaff & M. Conway (eds.), From the Couch to the Lab: Psychoanalysis, Neuroscience and Cognitive Psychology in Dialoge. Oxford University Press.
    This paper argues that recent work in the 'free energy' program in neuroscience enables us better to understand both consciousness and the Freudian unconscious, including the role of the superego and the id. This work also accords with research in developmental psychology (particularly attachment theory) and with evolutionary considerations bearing on emotional conflict. This argument is carried forward in various ways in the work that follows, including 'Understanding and Healing', 'The Significance of Consilience', 'Psychoanalysis, Philosophical Issues', and 'Kantian (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  46. Hypnosis and neuroscience: implications for the altered state debate.Steven Jay Lynn, Irving Kirsch, Josh Knox, Oliver Fassler & Lilienfeld & O. Scott - 2007 - In Graham Jamieson (ed.), Hypnosis and Conscious States: The Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective. Oxford University Press.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47. Consciousness and the End of Materialism: Seeking identity and harmony in a dark era.Spyridon Kakos - 2018 - International Journal of Theology, Philosophy and Science 2 (2):17-33.
    “I am me”, but what does this mean? For centuries humans identified themselves as conscious beings with free will, beings that are important in the cosmos they live in. However, modern science has been trying to reduce us into unimportant pawns in a cold universe and diminish our sense of consciousness into a mere illusion generated by lifeless matter. Our identity in the cosmos is nothing more than a deception and all the scientific evidence seem to support this idea. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  48.  7
    Consciousness and the Brain: A Scientific and Philosophical Inquiry.Gordon Globus, Grover Maxwell & Irwin Savodnik - 1976 - Plenum. Edited by Gordon G. Globus, Grover Maxwell & Irwin Savodnik.
    The relationship of consciousness to brain, which Schopenhauer grandly referred to as the "world knot," remains an unsolved problem within both philosophy and science. The central focus in what follows is the relevance of science---from psychoanalysis to neurophysiology and quantum physics-to the mind-brain puzzle. Many would argue that we have advanced little since the age of the Greek philosophers, and that the extraordinary accumulation of neuroscientific knowledge in this century has helped not at all. Increas- ingly, philosophers and scientists (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  49.  33
    At the intersection of emotion and consciousness: affective neuroscience and extended reticular thalamic activating system (ERTAS) theories of consciousness.Douglas F. Watt - 1999 - In Stuart R. Hameroff, Alfred W. Kaszniak & David J. Chalmers (eds.), Toward a Science of Consciousness Iii. MIT Press. pp. 215--229.
  50.  2
    Consciousness and object: a mind-object identity physicalist theory.Riccardo Manzotti - 2017 - Philadelphia: John Benjamins.
    What is the conscious mind? What is experience? In 1968, David Armstrong asked “What is a man?” and replied that a man is “a certain sort of material object”. This book starts from his question but proceeds along a different path. The traditional mind-brain identity theory is set aside, and a mind-object identity theory is proposed in its place: to be conscious of an object is simply to be made of that object. Consciousness is physical but not neural. This (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 1000