Results for 'Constituting Communities'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  15
    The Ambitions of Curiosity: Understanding the World in Ancient Greece and China. By GER Lloyd. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002. Pp. Xvi+ 175. Price Not Given. The Art of the Han Essay: Wang Fu's Ch'ien-Fu Lun. By Anne Behnke Kinney. Tempe: Center for Asian Studies, Arizona State University, 1990. Pp. Xi+ 154. [REVIEW]Thomas L. Kennedy Philadelphia, Cross-Cultural Perspectives By K. Ramakrishna, Constituting Communities, Theravada Buddhism, Jacob N. Kinnard Holt & Jonathan S. Walters Albany - 2004 - Philosophy East and West 54 (1):110-112.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2.  4
    On the Character of Social Communities, the State and the Public Domain.M. D. Stafleu - 2004 - Philosophia Reformata 69 (2):125-139.
    The view that organized social communities or associations differ from unorganized communities by having a kind of government or management exerting authority over the community appears almost obvious. Nevertheless it contradicts Dooyeweerd’s view, distinguishing organized communities from natural communities because of their being founded in the technical relation frame respectively the biotic one. This paper discusses the dual character of associations, requiring the introduction of a new relation frame. Determined by authority and discipline, the political relation (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  3. Talking the Talk: The Interactional Construction of Community and Identity at Conversation Analytic Data Sessions in Japan. [REVIEW]Cade Bushnell - 2012 - Human Studies 35 (4):583-605.
    A communities of practice framework views learning in terms of identity (trans)formation within and through participation, utilizing a set of shared resources, in a community organized around a joint endeavor, or practice. From an ethnomethodological perspective, however, the theoretical notions of community, shared resources, and identity constitute not explanatory resources, but rather topics requiring data-grounded exploration. In other words, the following empirical questions arise: If and how the participants (a) organize their group as community, (b) co-constitute a shared repertoire (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Heterosexualism and the Colonial / Modern Gender System.Maria Lugones - 2007 - Hypatia 22 (1):186-209.
    : The coloniality of power is understood by Anibal Quijano as at the constituting crux of the global capitalist system of power. What is characteristic of global, Eurocentered, capitalist power is that it is organized around two axes that Quijano terms "the coloniality of power" and "modernity." The coloniality of power introduces the basic and universal social classification of the population of the planet in terms of the idea of race, a replacing of relations of superiority and inferiority established (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  5.  54
    Real Wrongs in Virtual Communities.Thomas M. Powers - 2004 - Ethics and Information Technology 5 (4):191-198.
    Beginning with the well-knowncyber-rape in LambdaMOO, I argue that it ispossible to have real moral wrongs in virtualcommunities. I then generalize the account toshow how it applies to interactions in gamingand discussion communities. My account issupported by a view of moral realism thatacknowledges entities like intentions andcausal properties of actions. Austin's speechact theory is used to show that real people canact in virtual communities in ways that bothestablish practices and moral expectations, andwarrant strong identifications betweenthemselves and their online (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  6.  39
    Local Ecological Communities.Kim Sterelny - 2006 - Philosophy of Science 73 (2):215-231.
    A phenomenological community is an identifiable assemblage of organisms in a local habitat patch: a local wetland or mudflat are typical examples. Such communities are typically persistent: membership and abundance stay fairly constant over time. In this paper I discuss whether phenomenological communities are functionally structured, causal systems that play a role in determining the presence and abundance of organisms in a local habitat patch. I argue they are not, if individualist models of community assembly are vindicated; i.e., (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  7.  55
    Rethinking Medical Ethics: A View From Below.Paul Farmer - 2004 - Developing World Bioethics 4 (1):17–41.
    In this paper, we argue that lack of access to the fruits of modern medicine and the science that informs it is an important and neglected topic within bioethics and medical ethics. This is especially clear to those working in what are now termed 'resource-poor settings'- to those working, in plain language, among populations living in dire poverty. We draw on our experience with infectious diseases in some of the poorest communities in the world to interrogate the central imperatives (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  8.  22
    Biocertification and Neurodiversity: The Role and Implications of Self-Diagnosis in Autistic Communities.Jennifer C. Sarrett - 2016 - Neuroethics 9 (1):23-36.
    Neurodiversity, the advocacy position that autism and related conditions are natural variants of human neurological outcomes that should be neither cured nor normalized, is based on the assertion that autistic people have unique neurological differences. Membership in this community as an autistic person largely results from clinical identification, or biocertification. However, there are many autistic individuals who diagnose themselves. This practice is contentious among autistic communities. Using data gathered from Wrong Planet, an online autism community forum, this article describes (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  9.  18
    Heterosexualism and the Colonial/Modern Gender System.María Lugones - 2007 - Hypatia 22 (1):186-219.
    The coloniality of power is understood by Anibal Quijano as at the constituting crux of the global capitalist system of power. What is characteristic of global, Eurocentered, capitalist power is that it is organized around two axes that Quijano terms "the coloniality of power" and "modernity." The coloniality of power introduces the basic and universal social classification of the population of the planet in terms of the idea of race, a replacing of relations of superiority and inferiority established through (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  10.  54
    Anonymity and Personhood: Merleau-Ponty’s Account of the Subject of Perception.Sara Heinämaa - 2015 - Continental Philosophy Review 48 (2):123-142.
    Several commentators have argued that with his concept of anonymity Merleau-Ponty breaks away from classical Husserlian phenomenology that is methodologically tied to the first person perspective. Many contemporary commentators see Merleau-Ponty’s discourse on anonymity as a break away from Husserl’s framework that is seen as hopelessly subjectivistic and solipsistic. Some judge and reproach it as a disastrous misunderstanding that leads to a confusion of philosophical and empirical concerns. Both parties agree that Merleau-Ponty’s concepts of anonymity mark a divergence from classical (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  11. "We-Subjectivity": Husserl on Community and Communal Constitution.Ronald McIntyre - 2012 - In Christel Fricke & Dagfinn Føllesdal (eds.), Intersubjectivity and Objectivity in Adam Smith and Edmund Husserl. Ontos. pp. 61-92.
    I experience the world as comprising not only pluralities of individual persons but also interpersonal communal unities – groups, teams, societies, cultures, etc. The world, as experienced or "constituted", is a social world, a “spiritual” world. How are these social communities experienced as communities and distinguished from one another? What does it mean to be a “community”? And how do I constitute myself as a member of some communities but not of others? Moreover, the world of experience (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12.  34
    Cannot Manage Without the ‚Significant Other': Mining, Corporate Social Responsibility and Local Communities in Papua New Guinea. [REVIEW]Benedict Young Imbun - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 73 (2):177 - 192.
    The increasing pressure from different facets of society exerted on multinational companies (MNCs) to become more philanthropic and claim ownership of their impacts is now becoming a standard practice. Although research in corporate social responsibility (CSR) has arguably been recent (see subsequent section), the application of activities taking a voluntary form from MNCs seem to vary reflecting a plethora of factors, particularly one obvious being the backwater local communities of developing countries where most of the natural extraction projects are (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  13.  25
    An Herbiary of Plant Individuality.Sophie Gerber - 2018 - Philosophy, Theory, and Practice in Biology 10 (5):1-5.
    Questioning the nature of individuality has a long and a rich history, both in philosophy and in biology. Because they differ in several features from the pervasive vertebrate-human model, plants have been considered as complicating the question. Here, the various plant species on which authors—whether biologists or philosophers—rely to build the picture of plant individuality are examined and tracked for their peculiarities, thus constituting an “herbiary” of plant individuality. The herbiary of plant individuality has as its members species exhibiting (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Diversity in Epistemic Communities: A Response to Clough.Maya J. Goldenberg - 2014 - Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective Vol. 3, No. 5.
    In Clough’s reply paper to me (http://wp.me/p1Bfg0-1aN), she laments how feminist calls for diversity within scientific communities are inadvertently sidelined by our shared feminist empiricist prescriptions. She offers a novel justification for diversity within epistemic communities and challenges me to accept this addendum to my prior prescriptions for biomedical research communities (Goldenberg 2013) on the grounds that they are consistent with the epistemic commitments that I already endorse. In this response, I evaluate and accept her challenge.
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  15.  43
    The Nature of Virtual Communities.Daniel Memmi - 2006 - AI and Society 20 (3):288-300.
    The impressive development of electronic communication techniques has given rise to virtual communities. The nature of these computer-mediated communities has been the subject of much recent debate. Are they ordinary social groups in electronic form, or are they fundamentally different from traditional communities? Understanding virtual communities seems a prerequisite for the design of better communication systems. To clarify this debate, we will resort to the classical sociological distinction between small traditional communities (based on personal relations) (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  16.  58
    Fruit and Vegetable Access in Four Low-Income Food Deserts Communities in Minnesota.Deja Hendrickson, Chery Smith & Nicole Eikenberry - 2006 - Agriculture and Human Values 23 (3):371-383.
    Access to fruits and vegetables by low-income residents living in selected urban and rural Minnesotan communities was investigated. Communities were selected based on higher than state average poverty rates, limited access to grocery stores, and urban influence codes (USDA ERS codes). Four communities, two urban and two rural, were selected. Data were gathered from focus group discussions (n = 41), responses to a consumer survey (n = 396 in urban neighborhoods and n = 400 in rural (...)), and an inventory of foodstuffs available at stores located in all the communities and at large grocery stores in neighborhoods adjacent to the urban communities. In the two urban neighborhoods, a significant number of foods (26% and 52%) were significantly more expensive than the Thrifty Food Plan’s (TFP) market basket price (MBP). Additionally, a significant number of foods in the two rural communities were more expensive (11% and 26%). In focus groups, participants identified major barriers to shopping in their community to be cost, quality of food, and food choice limitations. Results of the food inventory show that foods within the communities were costly, of fair or poor quality, and limited in number and type available, supporting complaints verbalized by focus group participants. Through focus groups and surveys, participants expressed concern that healthy food choices were not affordable within their communities and believed that people in their community suffered from food insecurity. The absence of quality, affordable food for low-income residents in these four Minnesota communities prevents or diminishes their ability to choose foods that help maintain a healthy lifestyle. (shrink)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  17.  67
    The Legend of Order and Chaos: Communities and Early Community Ecology.Christopher H. Eliot - 2011 - In Kevin deLaplante, Bryson Browne & Kent A. Peacock (eds.), Philosophy of Ecology. Elsevier. pp. 49--108.
    A community, for ecologists, is a unit for discussing collections of organisms. It refers to collections of populations, which consist (by definition) of individuals of a single species. This is straightforward. But communities are unusual kinds of objects, if they are objects at all. They are collections consisting of other diverse, scattered, partly-autonomous, dynamic entities (that is, animals, plants, and other organisms). They often lack obvious boundaries or stable memberships, as their constituent populations not only change but also move (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  18.  40
    Without Borders? Notes on Globalization as a Mobility Regime.Ronen Shamir - 2005 - Sociological Theory 23 (2):197-217.
    While globalization is largely theorized in terms of trans-border flows, this article suggests an exploratory sociological framework for analyzing globalization as consisting of systemic processes of closure and containment. The suggested framework points at the emergence of a global mobility regime that actively seeks to contain social movement both within and across borders. The mobility regime is theorized as premised upon a pervasive "paradigm of suspicion" that conflates the perceived threats of crime, immigration, and terrorism, thus constituting a conceptual (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  19.  19
    The Concept of Yi (义) in the Mencius and Problems of Distributive Justice.Sor-Hoon Tan - 2014 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 92 (3):489-505.
    This paper examines attempts to find a conception of justice in early Confucian contexts, focusing on the concept of yi (translated as ?appropriateness?, ?right?, ?rightness?, even ?justice?) in the Mencius. It argues against the approach of deriving principles of dividing burdens and benefits from the discussions of concrete cases employing the concept of yi and instead shows that Confucian ethical concerns are more attentive to what kinds of interpersonal relations are appropriate in specific circumstances. It questions the exclusive emphasis in (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  20. The Referee's Dilemma. The Ethics of Scientific Communities and Game Theory.Tomislav Bracanovic - 2002 - Prolegomena 1 (1):55-74.
    This article argues that various deviations from the basic principles of the scientific ethos – primarily the appearance of pseudoscience in scientific communities – can be formulated and explained using specific models of game theory, such as the prisoner’s dilemma and the iterated prisoner’s dilemma. The article indirectly tackles the deontology of scientific work as well, in which it is assumed that there is no room for moral skepticism, let alone moral anti-realism, in the ethics of scientific communities. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21.  5
    Liberty, Bondage and Liberation in the Late Bronze Age.Eva von Dassow - 2018 - History of European Ideas 44 (6):658-684.
    ABSTRACTFree versus unfree was a fundamental axis of differentiation in ancient Near Eastern societies. Liberty was conceptualized as the power to govern oneself, free from another's domination, thus free to participate in constituting political authority. More concretely, the subject of the state was by definition free, this being the condition of obliging him for duty. Thus the relation between people and polity was predicated on liberty, not servitude as commonly supposed of an area still shackled to the Western ideology (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22.  33
    Ethics, Power and Communities: Corporate Social Responsibility Revisited.Denise Kleinrichert - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 78 (3):475-485.
    Ally-building can be an ethical pursuit in developing sources of power for the business manager. The commitment to social responsibility is a source of power, as well as an ethical practice for corporate endeavors. Pfeffer promotes a business manager's ability to develop effectiveness with ties to powerful others in an intra-organizational environment. This paper advances an analysis about how individuals in corporations may use an inter-organizational approach to developing sources of power through a notion of corporate social responsibility. As such, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  23.  36
    Comparison and History in the Study of Religious Ethics: An Essay on Michael Cook's "Commanding Right and Forbidding Wrong in Islamic Thought". [REVIEW]John Kelsay - 2007 - Journal of Religious Ethics 35 (2):347 - 373.
    Qur'an 3:104 speaks of "commanding right and forbidding wrong" as a constitutive feature of the Muslim community. Michael Cook's careful and comprehensive study provides a wealth of information about the ways Muslims in various contexts have understood this notion. Cook also makes a number of comparative observations, and suggests that "commanding" appears to be a uniquely Muslim practice. Scholars of religious ethics should read Cook's study with great appreciation. They will also have a number of questions about his comparative comments. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  24.  59
    Reciprocity, Individuals and Community: Remarks on Phenomenology, Social Theory and Politics.Matteo Bianchin - 2003 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 29 (6):631-654.
    The contribution of Husserl's phenomenology to the foundations of social and political theory can be appraised at both the methodological and the normative level. First, it makes intersubjective interaction central to the constitution of social reality. Second, it stresses reciprocity as a constitutive feature of intersubjectivity. In this context, individuals can be seen to be both ‘constituting’ and ‘constituted by’ their participation in communities, under a constraint of mutual recognition as intentional agents. This view is in no way (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  25.  18
    Value Wars in the New Periphery: Sustainability, Rural Communities and Agriculture. [REVIEW]Jennifer Sumner - 2005 - Agriculture and Human Values 22 (3):303-312.
    Sustainability has been the subject of prolonged debate within both academic and mainstream literature, rendered all the more heated because many of the disagreements come down to deep differences in values. These "value wars'' play out in decisions made about issues ranging from development and investment to livelihoods and agriculture. Using rural communities as the context for discussion, this article proposes new directions for this contested concept, based on the life code of values. These life values ground sustainability in (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  26.  92
    Mental Capacity and the Applied Phenomenology of Judgement.Wayne Martin & Ryan Hickerson - 2013 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (1):195-214.
    We undertake to bring a phenomenological perspective to bear on a challenge of contemporary law and clinical practice. In a wide variety of contexts, legal and medical professionals are called upon to assess the competence or capacity of an individual to exercise her own judgement in making a decision for herself. We focus on decisions regarding consent to or refusal of medical treatment and contrast a widely recognised clinical instrument, the MacCAT-T, with a more phenomenologically informed approach. While the MacCAT-T (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27.  58
    Reconstructing Civil Society with Intermedia Communities.Aldo de Moor - 2010 - AI and Society 25 (3):279-289.
    A healthy civil society is essential in order to deal with “wicked” societal problems. Merely involving institutional actors and mass media is not sufficient. Intermedia can play a crucial complementary role in strengthening civil society. However, the potential of these technologies needs to be carefully tailored to the requirements and constraints of the communities grown around them. The GRASS system for group report authoring is one carefully tailored socio-technical system aimed at unlocking this potential. Such systems may help to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28.  47
    The Body and Communities in Cyberspace: A Mmarcellian Analysis. [REVIEW]Thomas C. Anderson - 2000 - Ethics and Information Technology 2 (3):153-158.
    Many who speak glowingly about the possibilities for human relations in cyberspace, or virtual communities, laud them precisely because such communities are to a great extent free of the real spatial-temporal restrictions rooted in the limitations of our bodies. In this paper I investigate the importance of the body in establishing and maintaining human relations by considering the thought of the twentieth century French philosopher Gabriel Marcel. Because Marcel emphasized the central importance of the body in one's personal (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  29.  30
    Collaborative Information Environments to Support Knowledge Construction by Communities.Gerry Stahl - 2000 - AI and Society 14 (1):71-97.
    Computer-based design environments for skilled domain workers have recently graduated from research prototypes to commercial products, supporting the learning of individual designers. Such systems do not, however, adequately support the collaborative nature of work or the evolution of knowledge within communities of practice. If innovation is to be supported within collaborative efforts, thesedomain-oriented design environments (DODEs) must be extended to becomecollaborative information environments (CIEs), capable of providing effective community memories for managing information and learning within constantly evolving collaborative contexts. (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  30.  12
    Identity Formation Through Brokering in Scientific Practice.Rieko Sawyer - 2003 - Outlines. Critical Practice Studies 5 (2):25-42.
    Inspired by recent theorization by Dreier and Lave concerning situated perspectives on learning, I illuminate learning of international graduate students in a science lab in Japan as trajectories of participation in multi-layered activities and various mutually constituted occasions, and as crossing of multiple communities of practice. By doing so, I describe trajectories of participation as unique and multiple ways characteristic of individual participants instead of as a linear process from newcomer to old-timer or from peripheral to full participation in (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  31.  23
    Lifestyle and Rights: A Neo-Secular Conception of Human Dignity.Ahmet Murat Aytaç - 2017 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 43 (4-5):495-502.
    The challenges facing the life-worlds of political societies in the Islamic world require a radical shift of perspective that can improve our understanding of the contemporary situation of human rights politics. Not only the classical formulation of secularism, which aims at liberating the public sphere from domination of ‘the sacred’, but also the political-theological approach, which addresses the problems of modernity within the context of a disguised and refurbished dominance of ‘the transcendence’, suffer from and share a basic insufficiency in (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32.  18
    Networking Communities From the Bottom Up: Grassroots Approaches to Overcoming the Digital Divide. [REVIEW]Mark B. Gaved & Paul Mulholland - 2010 - AI and Society 25 (3):345-357.
    Achieving meaningful usage of the Internet is more than attaining access: multiple social and technological insufficiencies must be overcome and continually readdressed. A wide variety of approaches have been undertaken to address these issues, both to enable individuals to cross the ‘digital divide’ and also to enhance community interactions. In this paper, we focus on one approach–grassroots networked communities. These are communities of locality that have developed their own computer network infrastructure with minimal external support. We analyse eight (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. Elaborating "Dialogue" in Communities of Inquiry: Attention to Discourse as a Method for Facilitating Dialogue Across Difference.Jennifer A. Vadeboncoeur, Claire Alkouatli & Negar Amini - 2015 - Childhood and Philosophy 11 (22):299-318.
    In communities of inquiry, dialogue is central as both the means and the outcome of collective inquiry. Indeed, features of dialogue—including formulating and asking questions, developing hypotheses and explanations, and offering and requesting reasons—are often highlighted as playing a significant role in the quality of the dialogue that unfolds. We inquire further into the quality of dialogue by arguing that dialogue should enable the expansion of epistemic openness, rather than its contraction, and that this is especially important in multicultural (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34.  26
    Endorsement of Ethnomedicinal Knowledge Towards Conservation in the Context of Changing Socio-Economic and Cultural Values of Traditional Communities Around Binsar Wildlife Sanctuary in Uttarakhand, India.P. C. Phondani, R. K. Maikhuri & N. S. Bisht - 2013 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (3):573-600.
    The study of the interrelationship between ethnomedicinal knowledge and socio-cultural values needs to be studied mainly for the simple reason that culture is not only the ethical imperative for development, it is also the condition of its sustainability; for their exists a symbiotic relationship between habitats and cultures. The traditional communities around Binsar Wildlife Sanctuary of Uttarakhand state in India have a rich local health care tradition, which has been in practice for the past hundreds of years. The present (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35.  27
    Dogmas of Difference: Culture and Nationalism in Theories of International Politics.Stephanie Lawson - 1998 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 1 (4):62-92.
    A feature of recent social science theorizing has been a revival of interest in the concept of culture. While always fundamental to the discipline of anthropology, the culture concept is now commonly employed in other fields as well. Since the end of the Cold War in particular, theories of international politics have been in search of fresh explanatory categories and the culture concept has been adopted in some influential approaches to serve this purpose. As with other social science concepts, however, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36.  11
    Imagining New Social Legal Futures: A Sociolinguistic Analysis of Pre-Law Students’ Experiences with Discourse Communities of Legal Practice.Courtney Hanny - 2016 - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 29 (1):87-120.
    This paper considers the ways that concepts such as social justice and law were used as semiotic objects-in-tension by a group of five US undergraduates considering law school to make sense of their ideas about entering the discourse communities and communities of practice associated with being a lawyer. This group was made up of undergraduate women who had completed a summer residency program sponsored by the Law School Admissions Council to increase enrollment of students from under-represented groups. Of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37.  6
    Wishing and Hoping: Some Thoughts on the Place of the Future in a Philosophy of the Present.J. Craig Hanks - 1999 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 6 (2):25-28.
    In this essay I think about the ways in which orientation towards the future plays a central role in constituting meaningful lives. Much intellectual work on the nature of persons takes our existence as something given and static, and much of it treats persons as either isolated individuals, or as completely subsumed within a social identity. However, we are both, and neither; we are always individuals, and we are always social creatures, and yet we are never fully either of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38.  4
    Technomoral Civic Virtues: A Critical Appreciation of Shannon Vallor’s Technology and the Virtues.Don Howard - 2018 - Philosophy and Technology 31 (2):293-304.
    This paper begins by summarizing the chief, original contributions to technology ethics in Shannon Vallor’s recent book, Technology and the Virtues: A Philosophical Guide to a Future Worth Wanting, highlighting especially the book’s distinctive inclusion of not only the western virtue ethics tradition but also the analogous traditions in Buddhist and Confucian ethics. But the main point of the paper is to suggest that the theoretical framework developed in the book be extended to include an analysis of the distinctive civic (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39.  15
    Wishing and Hoping: Some Thoughts on the Place of the Future in a Philosophy of the Present.J. Craig Hanks - 1999 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 6 (2):25-28.
    In this essay I think about the ways in which orientation towards the future plays a central role in constituting meaningful lives. Much intellectual work on the nature of persons takes our existence as something given and static, and much of it treats persons as either isolated individuals, or as completely subsumed within a social identity. However, we are both, and neither; we are always individuals, and we are always social creatures, and yet we are never fully either of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40.  6
    The Concept of Yi in the Mencius and Problems of Distributive Justice.Sor-Hoon Tan - 2014 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 92 (3):489-505.
    This paper examines attempts to find a conception of justice in early Confucian contexts, focusing on the concept of yi in the Mencius. It argues against the approach of deriving principles of dividing burdens and benefits from the discussions of concrete cases employing the concept of yi and instead shows that Confucian ethical concerns are more attentive to what kinds of interpersonal relations are appropriate in specific circumstances. It questions the exclusive emphasis in justice-centred ethical discourse on assessing actions, and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41.  6
    Numeracy Coordinators: 'Brokering' Change Within and Between Communities of Practice?Brian Corbin, Olwen McNamara & Julian Williams - 2003 - British Journal of Educational Studies 51 (4):344 - 368.
    This paper draws on a study of numeracy coordinators in primary schools in the UK in the second year of the implementation of the National Numeracy Strategy (NNS). It identifies them as working between three main tasks: embedding the Strategy, sustaining teacher collegiality and auditing accountability. We identify tensions in 'being a coordinator' in relation to these tasks, especially for discourse and identity. We assess the usefulness of the metaphor of 'brokering' in 'communities of practice' (Wenger, 1998) to theorise (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42.  6
    A conversão ao pentecostalismo em comunidades tradicionais (The conversion to Pentecostalism in traditional communities) - DOI: 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2011v9n22p396. [REVIEW]Edin Sued Abumanssur - 2011 - Horizonte 9 (22):396-415.
    Em um primeiro momento, faço uma breve avaliação qualitativa da produção acadêmica sobre o pentecostalismo no Brasil. Em seguida, reflito sobre o processo de conversão ao pentecostalismo nos quilombos do Vale do Ribeira, São Paulo. A conversão em comunidades tradicionais, como as de caiçaras e quilombolas, tem se mantido como uma lacuna nas pesquisas dos estudiosos. No mínimo, as circunstâncias e os contextos em que se dão essas conversões não têm sido levados em consideração. Aponto aqui as relações entre formas (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43. Brain-Dead Patients Are Not Cadavers: The Need to Revise the Definition of Death in Muslim Communities[REVIEW]Mohamed Y. Rady & Joseph L. Verheijde - 2013 - HEC Forum 25 (1):25-45.
    The utilitarian construct of two alternative criteria of human death increases the supply of transplantable organs at the end of life. Neither the neurological criterion (heart-beating donation) nor the circulatory criterion (non-heart-beating donation) is grounded in scientific evidence but based on philosophical reasoning. A utilitarian death definition can have unintended consequences for dying Muslim patients: (1) the expedited process of determining death for retrieval of transplantable organs can lead to diagnostic errors, (2) the equivalence of brain death with human death (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  44. Feminist Theories of Evidence and Research Communities: A Reply to Goldenberg.Sharyn Clough - 2013 - Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 2 (12):xx-yy.
    In a recent essay — “How Can Feminist Theories of Evidence Assist Clinical Reasoning and Decision-making?” — Maya Goldenberg discusses criticisms of evidence-based medicine (or EBM) (Goldenberg 2013). She is particularly interested in those criticisms that make use of an epistemic appeal to the underdetermination of theory by evidence...
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  45.  13
    Acceptability of Electrical Stunning and Post-Cut Stunning Among Muslim Communities: A Possible Dialogue.Antonio Cuccurese, Paola Sechi, Beniamino T. Cenci-Goga, Antonio Poeta, Valentina Cambiotti, Enrico Santella & Germana Salamano - 2013 - Society and Animals 21 (5):443-458.
    Current technical-scientific advances allow a reappraisal of some practices used during religious slaughter without compromising its deep and essential meaning, through to the identification of techniques that limit the nonhuman animal vigilance without causing any lesion that may impair its integrity. All this in respect of religious principles of the Jewish and Muslim community and in respect of animal welfare, minimizing as much as possible the risk of causing useless suffering to the animals. A demonstrative slaughter was performed in a (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  46.  28
    Dynamics of Individual Specialization and Global Diversification in Communities.Vivek S. Borkar, Sanjay Jain & Govindan Rangarajan - 1998 - Complexity 3 (3):50-56.
  47.  23
    Democratic Classroom Communities.Barbara J. Thayer-Bacon - 1996 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 15 (4):333-351.
  48.  2
    Branding and Communities: The Normative Dimension.Bent Sørensen - 2019 - Semiotica 2019 (226):135-152.
    Name der Zeitschrift: Semiotica Jahrgang: 2019 Heft: 226 Seiten: 135-152.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49.  8
    Religion and the New Roles of Youth in Sub-Saharan Africa: The Hausa and Ebira Muslim Communities in Northern Nigeria, 1930s-1980s. [REVIEW]Mukhtar Umar Bunza & Abdullahi Musa Ashafa - 2010 - Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 9 (27):302-331.
    This paper is a comparative study of two northern Nigerian Muslim societies (the Ebira in central Nigeria and the Hausa in the North-west) in which the youths contested religious traditionalists in the 20th century and in the process brought about transformation in their societies. In the religious sphere, which was hitherto considered an affair of the elderly, the youth have equally come to assume a dominant place, especially in their assertive activist posture. In these two case studies, the youths have (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50.  3
    Web U2: Emerging Online Communities and Gendered Intimacy in the Asia-Pacific Region.Larissa Hjorth - 2009 - Knowledge, Technology & Policy 22 (2):117-124.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 1000