Results for 'Consumption (Economics'

90 found
Order:
  1. Representation and Structure in Economics: The Methodology of Econometric Models of the Consumption Function.Hsiang-Ke Chao - 2009 - Routledge.
    This book provides a methodological perspective on understanding the essential roles of econometric models in the theory and practice. Offering a comprehensive and comparative exposition of the accounts of models in both econometrics and philosophy of science, this work shows how econometrics and philosophy of science are interconnected while exploring the methodological insight of econometric modelling that can be added to modern philosophical thought. The notion of structure is thoroughly discussed throughout the book. The studies of the consumption function (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  20
    Representation and Structure in Economics. The Methodology of Econometric Models of the Consumption Function , Hsiang-Ke Chao. Routledge, 2009, XIV + 161 Pages. [REVIEW]Federica Russo - 2010 - Economics and Philosophy 26 (1):114-118.
  3.  1
    Representation and Structure in Economics. The Methodology of Econometric Models of the Consumption Function, Chao Hsiang-Ke. Routledge, 2009, Xiv + 161 Pages. [REVIEW]Federica Russo - 2010 - Economics and Philosophy 26 (1):114-118.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. Review of Hsiang-Ke Chao’s Representation and Structure in Economics: The Methodology of Econometric Models of the Consumption Function. [REVIEW]Christopher Gilbert - 2010 - Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics 3 (2):136-141.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Review of Representation and Structure in Economics. The Methodology of Econometric Models of the Consumption Function. [REVIEW]Federica Russo - 2010 - Economics and Philosophy 26 (1):114-118.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  8
    Which Structure Do Models Represent? Representation and Structure in Economics: The Methodology of Econometric Models of the Consumption Function.Alessio Moneta - 2010 - Journal of Economic Methodology 17 (3):338-343.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. Material Culture and Mass Consumption.Daniel Miller - 1987 - Blackwell.
  8. Sustainable Consumption: A Philosophical and Moral Approach.Maciej Bazela - 2008 - Ateneo Pontificio Regina Apostolorum.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  19
    Sustainability and New Models of Consumption: The Solidarity Purchasing Groups in Sicily. [REVIEW]Luigi Cembalo, Giuseppina Migliore & Giorgio Schifani - 2013 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (1):281-303.
    European society, with its steadily increasing welfare levels, is not only concerned with food (safety, prices), but also with other aspects such as biodiversity loss, landscape degradation, and pollution of water, soil, and atmosphere. To a great extent these concerns can be translated into a larger concept named sustainable development, which can be defined as a normative concept by). Sustainability in the food chain means creating a new sustainable agro-food system while taking the institutional element into account. While different concepts (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  10.  40
    Reducing Meat Consumption in Today's Consumer Society: Questioning the Citizen-Consumer Gap. [REVIEW]Erik de Bakker & Hans Dagevos - 2012 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (6):877-894.
    Abstract Our growing demand for meat and dairy food products is unsustainable. It is hard to imagine that this global issue can be solved solely by more efficient technologies. Lowering our meat consumption seems inescapable. Yet, the question is whether modern consumers can be considered as reliable allies to achieve this shift in meat consumption pattern. Is there not a yawning gap between our responsible intentions as citizens and our hedonic desires as consumers? We will argue that consumers (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  11.  13
    The Elephant in the Room: On the Absence of Corporations in Bernard Hodgson's Economics as a Moral Science. [REVIEW]John Douglas Bishop - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 108 (1):27-35.
    In his book Economics as a Moral Science , Bernard Hodgson argues that economics is not value neutral as is often claimed, but is a value-laden discipline. In the long argument for this in his book, Hodgson never discusses or even mentions corporations. This article explains that corporations are absent from Hodgson’s discussion because he considers only the consumption side of general equilibrium theory (GET), and it shows that if Hodgson had included corporations and the production side, his overall (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  41
    Regarding Nature: Industrialism and Deep Ecology.Andrew McLaughlin - 1993 - State University of New York Press.
    Regarding Nature: A conceptual introduction How should we regard nature? Until recently, this question was decisively answered by the practices of ...
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  13. Le Capitalisme Esthétique: Essai Sur l'Industrialisation du Goût.Olivier Assouly - 2008 - Editions du Cerf.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. Ironie Et Vérité.Mehdi Belhaj Kacem - 2009 - Nous.
    No categories
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. Resti Del Senso: Ripensare Il Mondo a Partire Dai Rifiuti.Gianluca Cuozzo - 2012 - Aracne.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  80
    Cute, Quaint, Hungry, and Romantic: The Aesthetics of Consumerism.Daniel Harris - 2000 - Basic Books.
    Why has the ring of the telephone become a beep? What ever happened to the bumpers and fenders of cars? Why do food commercials never mention hunger?In this encyclopedia of low-brow aesthetics, Daniel Harris concentrates on the nuances of non-art, the uses of the useless, the politics of product design and advertising. We learn how advertisers exaggerate our sensual responses to eating, how close-up nature photography exaggerates the accessibility of the natural world, and how the mutated physiology of dolls invites (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17. Hedonismus: Genuss - Laster - Widerstand: Beiträge der Tagung Am Zentrum für Gastrosophie, Salzburg, 24.-25. Februar 2012. [REVIEW]Lothar Kolmer & Michael Brauer (eds.) - 2013 - Mandelbaum.
    No categories
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18. Hedonismus: Genuss - Laster - Widerstand.Lothar Kolmer & Michael Brauer (eds.) - 2013 - Mandelbaum.
    No categories
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  12
    How Much is Enough?: Buddhism, Consumerism, and the Human Environment.Richard Karl Payne (ed.) - 2010 - Wisdom Publications.
    "In this book, the effects of our own decisions and actions on the human environment are examined from several different perspectives, all informed Buddhist thought.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. Ethics of Luxury: Materialism and Imagination.Jeanne Randolph - 2007 - Yyz Books.
  21.  52
    Consuming Choices: Ethics in a Global Consumer Age.David T. Schwartz - 2010 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Ethical consumerism -- Caveat emptor -- The consumer as causal agent -- The consumer as complicit participant -- Toward a practical consumer ethic.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. Ethics of Consumption: The Good Life, Justice, and Global Stewardship.Luis A. Camacho, Colin Campbell, David A. Crocker, Eleonora Curlo, Herman E. Daly, Eliezer Diamond, Robert Goodland, Allen L. Hammond, Nathan Keyfitz, Robert E. Lane, Judith Lichtenberg, David Luban, James A. Nash, Martha C. Nussbaum, ThomasW Pogge, Mark Sagoff, Juliet B. Schor, Michael Schudson, Jerome M. Segal, Amartya Sen, Alan Strudler, Paul L. Wachtel, Paul E. Waggoner, David Wasserman & Charles K. Wilber - 1997 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    In this comprehensive collection of essays, most of which appear for the first time, eminent scholars from many disciplines—philosophy, economics, sociology, political science, demography, theology, history, and social psychology—examine the causes, nature, and consequences of present-day consumption patterns in the United States and throughout the world.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
  23. Compassion, by the Pound: The Economics of Farm Animal Welfare.F. Bailey Norwood & Jayson L. Lusk - 2011 - Oxford University Press.
    This highly readable book is aimed at anyone with an interest in the food they eat. In conversational tone, and avoiding academic jargon, it provides an honest and objective account of the consequences of food consumption choices and policies, through the lens of economics.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  24. Understanding Consumption.Angus Deaton - 1995 - Oxford University Press UK.
    This book provides an overview of the recent research on saving and consumption, a field in which substantial progress has been made over the last decade.Attempts by economists to understand saving and consumption patterns have generated some of the best science in economics. For more than fifty years, there has been serious empirical and theoretical activity, and data, theory, and policy have never been separated as has happened in many branches of economics. Research has drawn microeconomists interested in (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  25.  8
    Entrepreneurship and Values in a Democratic and Pragmatic Economics: Commentary on 'A Transactional View of Entrepreneurship'.John R. Shook - 2003 - Journal of Economic Methodology 10 (2):181-190.
    Entrepreneurship cannot be explained by any economic theory that isolates innovation from ongoing social processes or locates creativity in a space of given, fixed values. Unfortunately, mainstream economics has committed these mistakes, rooted in instrumentalist and antidemocratic notions of consumption and rationality that permits reasoning only about means toward given ends. Genuine innovation is, on Dewey's pragmatic approach to values, the intelligent modification of both means and ends for experimental action. When joined to an appreciation that consumption is (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  26.  6
    Higher Education, Collaboration and a New Economics.Amanda Fulford - 2016 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 50 (3):371-383.
    In this article I take as my starting point the economist, Jeremy Rifkin's, claims about the rise of what he calls the ‘collaborative commons’. For Rifkin, this is nothing less than the emergence of a new economic paradigm where traditional consumers exploit the possibilities of technology, and position themselves as ‘pro-sumers’. This emphasises their role in production rather than consumption alone, and shows how they aim to bypass a range of capitalist markets, from publishing to the music industry. In (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  5
    Economics, Ecology and Sustainable Development: Are They Compatible?Anthony M. Friend - 1992 - Environmental Values 1 (2):157-170.
    The prevailing economic paradigm, in which a closed circular flow of production and consumption can be described in terms of 'natural laws ' of the equilibrium of market forces, is being challenged by our growing knowledge of complex systems, particularly ecosystems. It is increasingly apparent that neo-classical economics does not reflect social, economic and environmental realities in a world of limited resources. The best way to understand the problems implicit in the concept of 'sustainable development ' is provided by (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  6
    Eudaimonia, Economics and the Environment: What Do the Hellenistic Thinkers Have to Teach Economists About 'The Good Life'?Donald G. Richards - 2013 - Ethics and the Environment 18 (2):33-53.
    The concept of “the good life” is not one that receives much attention from conventional economic theory.1 About the closest it comes to such attention is in the area of welfare economics and here it is mostly concerned with the distribution of costs and benefits of various economic choices and wherein benefits are measured in terms of utility and costs in terms of disutility or utility foregone. It is usually taken for granted that utility is a function of consumption (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  9
    Behavioral Momentum and Behavioral Economic Metaphors for Excessive Consumption.Rudy E. Vuchinich - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (1):114-115.
    Metaphors “highlight and hide” different aspects of phenomena. A behavioral economic metaphor for excessive consumption highlights the contextual features of behavioral-environment relations. Can the behavioral momentum metaphor generate a representation of context that is at least as useful as that generated by behavioral economics? Maybe, maybe not; or maybe a mixed metaphor will do a better job than either alone.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30. Ethics of Consumption: The Good Life, Justice, and Global Stewardship.David A. Crocker & Toby Linden (eds.) - 1997 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    In this comprehensive collection of essays, most of which appear for the first time, eminent scholars from many disciplines—philosophy, economics, sociology, political science, demography, theology, history, and social psychology—examine the causes, nature, and consequences of present-day consumption patterns in the United States and throughout the world.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31. Consuming Symbolic Goods: Identity and Commitment, Values and Economics.Wilfred Dolfsma (ed.) - 2008 - Routledge.
    The phenomenon of consumption has increasingly drawn attention from economists. While the ‘sole purpose of production is consumption’, as Adam Smith has claimed, economists have up to recently generally ignored the topic. This book brings together a range of different perspectives on the topic of consumption that will finally shed the necessary light on a largely neglected theme, such as Why is the consumption of symbolic goods different than that of goods that are not constitutive of (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32. Classic Papers in Natural Resource Economics Revisited.Chennat Gopalakrishnan (ed.) - 2016 - Routledge.
    _Classic Papers in Natural Resource Economics Revisited_ is the first attempt to bring together a selection of classic papers in natural resource economics, alongside reflections by highly regarded professionals about how these papers have impacted the field. The seven papers included in this volume are grouped into five sections, representing the five core areas in natural resource economics: the intertemporal problem; externalities and market failure; property rights, institutions and public choice; the economics of exhaustible resources; and the economics of renewable (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. Collected Works of Michal Kalecki: Volume 7: Studies in Applied Economics, 1940-1967.Michal Kalecki - 1997 - Oxford University Press UK.
    The seventh volume of the Collected Works of Michal Kalecki, one of the twentieth century's preeminent economists, contains his empirical studies of the wartime and post-war economy in Britain and the USA, together with papers on the work of other economists and miscellanea.The first part of the book collects together his articles on the economic conditions of Britain during the Second World War, focusing on the rationing of consumption and war finance, and its post-war reconstructions. These articles are among (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  21
    From Value to Values: Sustainable Consumption at Farmers Markets. [REVIEW]Alison Hope Alkon - 2008 - Agriculture and Human Values 25 (4):487-498.
    Advocates of environmental sustainability and social justice increasingly pursue their goals through the promotion of so-called “green” products such as locally grown organic produce. While many scholars support this strategy, others criticize it harshly, arguing that environmental degradation and social injustice are inherent results of capitalism and that positive social change must be achieved through collective action. This study draws upon 18 months of ethnographic fieldwork at two farmers markets located in demographically different parts of the San Francisco Bay Area (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  35.  22
    Educational Insights of the Economist: Tibor Scitovsky on Education, Production and Creative Consumption.Tal Gilead - 2013 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 32 (6):623-639.
  36.  37
    Christian Coff: The Taste for Ethics: An Ethic of Food Consumption[REVIEW]Michael A. Long - 2009 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 22 (6):605-606.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  12
    The Changing Bio-Politics of the Organic: Production, Regulation, Consumption[REVIEW]David Goodman - 2000 - Agriculture and Human Values 17 (3):211-213.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38.  10
    Human Needs, Consumption, and Social Policy.Social Policy - 1999 - Economics and Philosophy 15:187-208.
    From its early origins to the present, the development of mainstream economic theory has taken a direction which has excluded the analysis of human needs as a basis for social policy. The problems associated with this orientation are increasingly recognized both by economists and non-economists. As Sen (1985) points out, it is indeed strange for a discipline concerned with the well-being of people to neglect the question of needs. Currently, some writers such as Doyal and Gough (1991), post-Keynesian economists such (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39.  17
    Human Needs, Consumption, and Social Policy.Ayşe Buğra & Gürol Irzik - 1999 - Economics and Philosophy 15 (2):187.
    From its early origins to the present, the development of mainstream economic theory has taken a direction which has excluded the analysis of human needs as a basis for social policy. The problems associated with this orientation are increasingly recognized both by economists and non-economists. As Sen points out, it is indeed strange for a discipline concerned with the well-being of people to neglect the question of needs. Currently, some writers such as Doyal and Gough, post-Keynesian economists such as Lavoie, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  8
    Audience Effects In Consumption.Metin M. Coşgel - 1994 - Economics and Philosophy 10 (1):19.
    Consider how your consumption would change if you were stranded on a deserted island. Isolation would eliminate all social influences on your consumption decisions, even for the same choice set. You might decide not to consume cosmetics, curtains, or neckties, and pay less attention to the style or color of your clothes, car, or furniture. These choices might not matter as much to you anymore, for you would not have to consider the reactions of other individuals to your (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41.  4
    Fair Trade: Towards an Economics of Virtue. [REVIEW]Alex Nicholls - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 92 (2):241 - 255.
    Over the past 10 years the sales of Fair Trade goods - particularly those carrying the Fair Trade Labelling Organizations International (FLO) certification mark - have grown exponentially. Academic interest in Fair Trade has also grown significantly over the past decade with researchers analysing the model from a wide range of theoretical perspectives. Whilst Fair Trade is generally acknowledged as a new supply chain model, it has tended to be studied at the micro/organisational level rather than at the macro/systems level. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   8 citations  
  42.  7
    Utility-Enhancing Consumption Constraints.David Levy - 1988 - Economics and Philosophy 4 (1):69.
    The Greek poets and philosophers, united in a belief that men and women perceive the world around them very poorly, for this reason describe much of human behavior as fumbling for happiness in the dark. By contrast, perception failure is anathema to the modern tradition, as even the most innocent sort plays havoc with modern preference axioms.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  43.  15
    6. Happiness and the Relative Consumption Hypothesis.Amitava Krishna Dutt - 2009 - In Amitava Krishna Dutt & Benjamin Radcliff (eds.), Happiness, Economics and Politics: Towards a Multi-Disciplinary Approach. Edward Elgar.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44.  13
    "The Taste Approach?. Governance Beyond Libertarian Paternalism.Tor Otterholt - 2010 - Revue de Philosophie Économique 11 (1):57.
    Well-being can be promoted in two ways. Firstly, by affecting the quantity, quality and allocation of bundles of consumption (the Resource Approach), and secondly, by influencing how people benefit from their goods (the Taste Approach). Whereas the former is considered an ingredient of economic analysis, the latter has conventionally not been included in that field. By identifying the gain the Taste Approach might yield, the article questions whether this asymmetry is justified. If successfully exercised, the Taste Approach might not (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45.  14
    In Defense of Environmental Economics.Steven E. Edwards - 1987 - Environmental Ethics 9 (1):73-85.
    The appropriateness of economic valuations of the natural environment is defended on the basis of an objective analysis of individuals’ preferences. The egoistic model of “economic man” substantiates economic valuations of instrumental values even when markets do not exist and when consumption and use are not involved. However, “altruistic man’s” genuine commitment to the well-being of others, particularly wildlife and future generations, challenges economic valuations at a fundamental level. In this case, self-interest and an indifference between states of the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  46.  9
    The Political Construction of Free Trade Visions: The Geo-Politics and Geo-Economics of Australian Beef Exporting. [REVIEW]Bill Pritchard - 2006 - Agriculture and Human Values 23 (1):37-50.
    This article contributes to emergent scholarship that questions neoliberal discourses in agricultural policy, through a case study that challenges assumptions about the role of “the market” in explaining the recent expansion of Australian beef exports. Australia is the world’s largest beef exporter and its beef exports more than doubled between the mid-1980s and the turn of the 21st century. This expansion, however, can be explained through a particular conjunction of political conditions, which are unlikely to be repeated with equal force (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47.  2
    The Accursed Share: Volume 1: Consumption.Robert Hurley (ed.) - 1991 - Zone Books.
    Most Anglo-American readers know Bataille as a novelist. The Accursed Share provides an excellent introduction to Bataille the philosopher. Here he uses his unique economic theory as the basis for an incisive inquiry into the very nature of civilization. Unlike conventional economic models based on notions of scarcity, Bataille's theory develops the concept of excess: a civilization, he argues, reveals its order most clearly in the treatment of its surplus energy. The result is a brilliant blend of ethics, aesthetics, and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48. 8 The Relationship Between Consumption and Production.Elizabeth Oughton & Jane Wheelock - 2006 - In Betsy Jane Clary, Wilfred Dolfsma & Deborah M. Figart (eds.), Ethics and the Market: Insights From Social Economics. Routledge. pp. 98.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49. Hazel Kyrk and the Ethics of Consumption.Susan Van Velzen - 2003 - In Drucilla K. Barker & Edith Kuiper (eds.), Toward a Feminist Philosophy of Economics. Routledge.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50.  17
    Discounting for Public Policy: A Survey.Hilary Greaves - forthcoming - Economics and Philosophy.
    This article is a critical survey of the debate over the value of the social discount rate, with a particular focus on climate change. The ma- jority of the material surveyed is from the economics rather than from the philosophy literature, but the emphasis of the survey itself is on founda- tions in ethical and other normative theory rather than highly technical details. I begin by locating the standard approach to discounting within the overall landscape of ethical theory, and explaining (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 90