Results for 'Continental philosophy of science'

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  1. Proceedings of the International Colloquium in the Philosophy of Science, London, 1965.Imre Lakatos, British Society for the Philosophy of Science, London School of Economics and Political Science & International Union of the History and Philosophy of Science - 1967
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  2. In Honour of Philipp Frank Proceedings of the Boston Colloquium for the Philosophy of Science, 1962-1964.R. S. Cohen, Marx W. Wartofsky & Boston Colloquium for the Philosophy of Science - 1965 - Humanities Press.
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  3. Realism and Anti-Realism in the Philosophy of Science Beijing International Conference, 1992.R. S. Cohen, Risto Hilpinen, Jen-Tsung Ch Iu & Beijing International Conference on Philosophy of Science - 1996
     
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  4. Scientific Knowledge Socialized Selected Proceedings of the 5th Joint International Conference on History and Philosophy of Science.Imre Hronszky, Márta Fehér, Balázs Dajka & International Union of the History and Philosophy of Science - 1988
  5. Logic, Methodology, and Philosophy of Science Proceedings.Ernest Nagel & International Union of the History and Philosophy of Science - 1962 - Stanford University Press.
  6. Change and Progress in Modern Science Papers Related to and Arising From the Fourth International Conference on History and Philosophy of Science, Blacksburg, Virginia, November 1982.Joseph C. Pitt & International Union of the History and Philosophy of Science - 1985
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  7. Logic, Methodology and Philosophy of Science. Proceedings.Patrick Suppes, International Union of the History and Philosophy of Science & Academia Republicii Socialiste România - 1973
  8. Continental Philosophy of Science.Babette Babich - 2007 - In Constantin Boundas (ed.), The Edinburgh Companion to the Twentieth Century Philosophies. Edinburgh. University of Edinburgh Press. pp. 545--558.
    Continental philosophies of science tend to exemplify holistic themes connecting order and contingency, questions and answers, writers and readers, speakers and hearers. Such philosophies of science also tend to feature a fundamental emphasis on the historical and cultural situatedness of discourse as significant; relevance of mutual attunement of speaker and hearer; necessity of pre-linguistic cognition based in human engagement with a common socio-cultural historical world; role of narrative and metaphor as explanatory; sustained emphasis on understanding questioning; truth (...)
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  9.  34
    Towards a Critical Philosophy of Science: Continental Beginnings and Bugbears, Whigs, and Waterbears.Babette Babich - 2010 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 24 (4):343-391.
    Continental philosophy of science has developed alongside mainstream analytic philosophy of science. But where continental approaches are inclusive, analytic philosophies of science are not?excluding not merely Nietzsche?s philosophy of science but Gödel?s philosophy of physics. As a radicalization of Kant, Nietzsche?s critical philosophy of science puts science in question and Nietzsche?s critique of the methodological foundations of classical philology bears on science, particularly evolution as well as (...)
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  10.  23
    Continental Philosophy of Social Science: Hermeneutics, Genealogy, Critical Theory.Yvonne Sherratt - 2006 - Cambridge University Press.
    Continental Philosophy of Social Science demonstrates the unique and autonomous nature of the continental approach to social science and contrasts it with the Anglo-American tradition. Yvonne Sherratt argues for the importance of an historical understanding of the Continental tradition in order to appreciate its individual, humanist character. Examining the key traditions of hermeneutic, genealogy, and critical theory, and the texts of major thinkers such as Gadamer, Ricoeur, Derrida, Nietzsche, Foucault, the Early Frankfurt School and (...)
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  11.  6
    Continental Contributions to Philosophy of Science.Regine Kather - 2006 - Prolegomena 5 (2):247-259.
    Autorica daje pregled zbornika radova Continental Philosophy of Science, koji je uredio Gary Gutting. Nakon uvodnih napomena o povijesnome odnosu između filozofije i znanosti, slijede prikaz i rasprava o filozofijama znanosti jedanaest njemačkih i francuskih autora čiji se tekstovi nalaze u ovome zborniku. Uz njezinu procjenu Guttingova zbornika, autoričin opći zaključak glasi kako karakteristično obilježje kontinentalne filozofije znanosti predstavlja pokušaj da se razradi potpunija slika svijeta, slika koja u obzir uzima živo iskustvo i pitanja koja su isključena (...)
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  12. Continental Philosophy of Social Science.Yvonne Sherratt - 2005 - Cambridge University Press.
    Continental Philosophy of Social Science demonstrates the unique and autonomous nature of the continental approach to social science and contrasts it with the Anglo-American tradition. Yvonne Sherratt argues for the importance of an historical understanding of the Continental tradition in order to appreciate its individual, humanist character. Examining the key traditions of hermeneutic, genealogy, and critical theory, and the texts of major thinkers such as Gadamer, Ricoeur, Derrida, Nietzsche, Foucault, the Early Frankfurt School and (...)
     
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  13. On the Idea of Continental and Postmodern Perspectives in the Philosophy of Science.Babette E. Babich, Debra B. Bergoffen & Simon V. Glynn - 1995 - In Babette E. Babich, Debra B. Bergoffen & Simon Glynn (eds.), Continental and Postmodern Perspectives in the Philosophy of Science. Avebury. pp. 1--7.
     
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  14.  26
    Continental and Postmodern Perspectives in the Philosophy of Science.Babette E. Babich, Debra B. Bergoffen & Simon Glynn (eds.) - 1995 - Avebury.
  15.  5
    Continental and Postmodern Perspectives in the Philosophy of Science.Babette E. Babich, Debra B. Bergoffen & Simon V. Glynn - 1997 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 48 (2):281-283.
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  16.  15
    Review. Continental and Postmodern Perspectives in the Philosophy of Science. BE Babich, DB Bergoffen, & SV Glynn (Eds).A. Belsey - 1997 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 48 (2):281-283.
  17. A Transcendental Philosophy of Science.Massimo Pigliucci - 2008 - Philosophy Now 66:48.
    Can there be a transcendental philosophy of science? What would it be good for?
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  18. Reconstructing Scientific Revolutions: Thomas S. Kuhn's Philosophy of Science.Paul Hoyningen-Huene - 1993 - University of Chicago Press.
    Few philosophers of science have influenced as many readers as Thomas S. Kuhn. Yet no comprehensive study of his ideas has existed--until now. In this volume, Paul Hoyningen-Huene examines Kuhn's work over four decades, from the days before The Structure of Scientific Revolutions to the present, and puts Kuhn's philosophical development in a historical framework. Scholars from disciplines as diverse as political science and art history have offered widely differing interpretations of Kuhn's ideas, appropriating his notions of paradigm (...)
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  19.  11
    Continental Philosophy and the History of Science.Gary Gutting - 1990 - In R. C. Olby, G. N. Cantor, J. R. R. Christie & M. J. S. Hodge (eds.), Companion to the History of Modern Science. Routledge. pp. 127--147.
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  20. Continental Philosophy of Science (Blackwell Readings in Continental Philosophy).Henri Bergson - 2005 - Malden MA: Blackwell.
  21. Yvonne Sherratt, Continental Philosophy of Social Science: Hermeneutics, Genealogy, and Critical Theory From Greece to the Twenty-First Century. [REVIEW]George Williamson - 2007 - Philosophy in Review 27:71-73.
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  22.  19
    Review of Yvonne Sherratt, Continental Philosophy of Social Science: Hermeneutics, Genealogy, and Critical Theory From Greece to the Twenty-First Century[REVIEW]Robert Piercey - 2006 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (9).
  23.  9
    Nietzsche’s Philosophy of Science[REVIEW]Wayne Klein - 1996 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 19 (1):181-183.
    The title of Babette Babich’s recent book might surprise many readers. While many would agree that Nietzsche undertakes a critique of science or Wissenschaft, and of the concepts of objectivity and truth which it presupposes, there appears to be little evidence in Nietzsche’s work of the type of sustained, critical reflection which would merit being called a philosophy of science. The central aim of Babich’s book is to reverse this impression. With an impressive knowledge of Nietzsche’s oeuvre (...)
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  24.  11
    Between the Philosophy of Science and Philosophical Anthropology. Gernot Böhme’s Critical Philosophy of Technology.Stanisław Czerniak - 2014 - Dialogue and Universalism 24 (4):125-145.
    The essay reconstructs the main aspects of Gernot Böhme’s philosophy of technolo-gy. In polemical reference to Max Horkheimer’s and Jürgen Habermas’ critical theory, Böhme asks about the rationality criteria of technology. He does not view his philosophy of technology as part of the philosophy of science but places it on the boundary between philosophical anthropology and social philosophy. Böhme reflects on the ethically negative, neutral and positive effects of the technification process both on the identity (...)
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  25.  30
    Philosophy and Science in the Social Theory of the Frankfurt School.Halina Walentowicz & Maciej Bańkowski - 2009 - Dialogue and Universalism 19 (3-5):209-225.
    The present essay focuses on the Frankfurt School’s views on relations between philosophy and science. The author specifically concentrates on Horkheimer, the School’s leader, and Habermas, its most prominent contemporary representative. In her reconstruction of the Frankfurt School’s approach to the dependencies between philosophy and science the author—similarly to the Frankfurt theoreticians—abstains from treating it abstractly, instead placing it in its social and historiosophical context. The essay’s leading thesis is that the Frankfurt School sees philosophical self-reflection (...)
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  26. A History of Science, Technology, and Philosophy in the 16th, 17th, and 18th Centuries.A. Wolf - 1935 - Thoemmes Press.
    Wolf's study represents an incredible work of scholarship. A full and detailed account of three centuries of innovation, these two volumes provide a complete portrait of the foundations of modern science and philosophy. Tracing the origins and development of the achievements of the modern age, it is the story of the birth and growth of the modern mind. A thoroughly comprehensive sourcebook, it deals with all the important developments in science and many of the innovations in the (...)
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  27.  23
    What Does Modern Science Say About the Origin of Cooperation? Science Confirms Philosophy.Marian Hillar - 2013 - Dialogue and Universalism 23 (3):23-34.
    During the last decades evolutionary science has made significance progress in the elucidation of the process of human evolution and especially of human behavioral characteristics. These themes were traditionally subjects of inquiry in philosophy and theology. Already Darwin suggested an evolutionary and biological basis for moral sense or conscience, and answered Kant’s question about the origin of the moral rules postulated by philosophers. This article reviews the current status of such investigations by natural scientists, biologists and psychologists, and (...)
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  28.  54
    The Rediscovery of Heidegger’s Worldly Subject by Analytic Philosophy of Science.Denis McManus - 1999 - The Monist 82 (2):324-346.
    This essay describes similarities between the conception of intentionality expressed in Heidegger’s early writings and the conception of propositional attitude psychology expressed in the recent work of William Bechtel and A. A. Abrahamsen. In different ways, these two approaches emphasise the “worldly” character of the intentional subject. There was a time when identifying similarities in view or argument between representatives of the “Analytic” and “Continental” camp was of intrinsic value because few in either camp believed such similarities existed. Fortunately, (...)
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  29. The History of Continental Philosophy.Alan D. Schrift (ed.) - 2010 - Routledge.
    This major work of reference is an indispensable resource for anyone conducting research or teaching in philosophy. An international team of over 100 leading scholars has been brought together under the general editorship of Alan Schrift and the volume editors to provide authoritative analyses of the continental tradition of philosophy from Kant to the present day. Divided, chronologically, into eight volumes, "The History of Continental Philosophy" is designed to be accessible to a wide range of (...)
     
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  30.  27
    Husserl’s Philosophy of Science.Jarosław Rolewski - 2013 - Dialogue and Universalism 23 (2):145-160.
    The paper presents Husserl’s conception of the relation between science and the living world, i.e. the world of everyday experience and communication. In Husserl view, science, or, more precisely, its basic aprioric structure is founded on the primal, essential core of the living world from which it obtains its sense. Science modifies, idealizes, and mathematizes the primal aprioric Lebenswelt. Due to those operations scientific theories can represent empirical reality.
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  31.  16
    Methodology and Truth: Analogies Between Hermeneutics and Post-Positivist Philosophy of Science.Paolo Parrini - 2009 - Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry 4 (9):12-25.
    For a long time–--maybe starting from the well known 1929 meeting in Davos–--the philosophy of exact and natural sciences deriving from Neo-positivism and hermeneutics followed separate ways. Post-positivistic philosophy of science and epistemology, though, saw the emerging of theses showing the existence of some affinities between the empirical method and the hermeneutical method. The paper singles these affinities out and discusses their consequences from the point of view of the problems of objectivity and truth. In particular, it (...)
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  32.  59
    The Politics of Modern Reason: Politics, Anti-Politics and Norms in Continental Philosophy.James Bohman - 1999 - The Monist 82 (2):235-252.
    While Continental philosophers have had much to say about the nature of politics and about modern political institutions, they do not consider their task to provide the basis for evaluating policies or justifying institutions. Even if analytic philosophers no longer think of themselves as giving conceptual analyses of key political terms, they generally do what Continental philosophers do not: by elaborating systematic principles, their goal is precisely to provide the basis for “evaluating the strengths and weaknesses of political (...)
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  33.  6
    Synergetics: New Universalism or Natural Philosophy of the Age of Post-Nonclassical Science?Helena Knyazeva & Sergey P. Kurdyumov - 2008 - Dialogue and Universalism 18 (11-12):39-60.
    The modern theory of the self-organization of complex systems, or synergetics, is considered in the context of historical traditions of natural philosophy. It is substantiated that it is unfairly to treat synergetics as a modern “speculative physics”, i.e. the natural philosophy of a new type. However, there is no doubt that on the basis of synergetics a certain worldview is built, and this worldview oversteps the boundaries of basic scientific disciplines and reaches a meta-scientific level of research. The (...)
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  34. The Need for a Revolution in the Philosophy of Science.Nicholas Maxwell - 2002 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 33 (2):381-408.
    There is a need to bring about a revolution in the philosophy of science, interpreted to be both the academic discipline, and the official view of the aims and methods of science upheld by the scientific community. At present both are dominated by the view that in science theories are chosen on the basis of empirical considerations alone, nothing being permanently accepted as a part of scientific knowledge independently of evidence. Biasing choice of theory in the (...)
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  35.  16
    Universalism of Christianity, Logic, Philosophy and Science.Zbigniew Wolak - 2007 - Dialogue and Universalism 17 (3-4):121-130.
    In this article I present a special contribution to universalism by the Cracow Circle (Bocheński, Drewnowski, Salamucha). Presented thinkers were scientists, philosophers and theologians, and tried to combine these disciplines in their works. They took standards of rationality from logic and other sciences, and applied them to Christian philosophy and theology. This kind of rationality can be considered universal and when we use this rationality in dialogue between religion and other worldviews, the dialogue has a chance to be really (...)
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  36.  89
    Objectivity in the Feminist Philosophy of Science.Marianne LeNabat - 2008 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 29 (2):208-211.
  37. History and Scientific Practice in the Construction of an Adequate Philosophy of Science: Revisiting a Whewell/Mill Debate.Aaron D. Cobb - 2011 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 42 (1):85-93.
    William Whewell raised a series of objections concerning John Stuart Mill’s philosophy of science which suggested that Mill’s views were not properly informed by the history of science or by adequate reflection on scientific practices. The aim of this paper is to revisit and evaluate this incisive Whewellian criticism of Mill’s views by assessing Mill’s account of Michael Faraday’s discovery of electrical induction. The historical evidence demonstrates that Mill’s reconstruction is an inadequate reconstruction of this historical episode (...)
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  38.  45
    New Directions in the Philosophy of Science: Toward a Philosophy of Science Policy.Carl Mitcham & Robert Frodeman - 2004 - Philosophy Today 48 (5):3-15.
    This is the introduction to a special, guest-edited issue of Philosophy Today. It lays out the extent to which the philosophy of science has ignored science policy and argues that policy issues deserve attention in parallel with epistemological ones. It further reviews the historical development of science policy in the United States since World War II, identifies some recent contributions to critical reflection on basic science policy assumptions, and outlines a set of issues to (...)
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  39.  38
    Is Kuhn’s Revolution in the Philosophy of Science a Pseudo-Revolution?Gerard Radnitzky - 1990 - International Studies in Philosophy 22 (1):77-78.
    In his latest book Kritik und Wissenschaftsgeschichte (Criticism and the History of Science, 1988), Gunnar Andersson clarifies the logical aspects of falsification and metalogical relationships between falsification, prediction and explanation. By analyzing the case studies on which Kuhn and Feyerabend have based their arguments for the incommensurability thesis, he shows that thesis to be untenable. A decisive criticism of the "new philosophy of science" is given. In the process Popper's methodology is developed further. It is shown that (...)
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  40.  40
    With One Headlight: Merleau-Ponty and the Philosophy of Science.Nancy J. Holland - 2002 - Philosophy Today 46 (5):28-33.
    This paper investigates the philosophy of science that is implicit in all of Maurice Merleau-Ponty's work, but made more explicit in the lectures recently published as _Nature<D>. It outlines the relevant argument from these lectures and concludes that Merleau-Ponty's philosophy of science is difficult to see as such because of the way he blends philosophy, science, and philosophy of science in his work by interweaving phenomenology with empirical data from the natural and (...)
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  41.  25
    Theory-Change and the Logic of Enquiry : New Bearings in Philosophy of Science Theory-Change of Enquiry : New Bearings in of Science Philosophy.Christopher Norris - 1999 - Review of Metaphysics 53 (1):21-68.
    This article examines various (in my view) failed or problematic attempts to overcome the limits of logical empiricism in epistemology and philosophy of science. It focuses on Quine's influential critique of that doctrine and on subsequent critiques of Quine that challenge his appeal to the scheme/content dichotomy as a third residual 'dogma' of empiricism (Davidson) or his espousal of a radically physicalist approach that rejects the possibility of quantifying into modal contexts (Marcus). I endorse these criticisms as valid (...)
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  42.  22
    Theory-Change and the Logic of Enquiry: New Bearings in Philosophy of Science.Christopher Norris - 1999 - Review of Metaphysics 53 (1):21 - 68.
    ANGLO-AMERICAN PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE has tended to define itself squarely against the kinds of so-called metaphysical approaches that have characterized so-called continental philosophy in the line of descent from Husserl. Indeed, Husserl’s project of phenomenological enquiry was the target of criticism by Frege—and later by Gilbert Ryle—which pretty much set the agenda for subsequent debate. That project seemed to them some form of argument that reveals his basically psychologistic approach, one that purported to address issues of (...)
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  43.  28
    Philosophy as Rigorous Regional Studies: A Parody of E. Husserl's Philosophy as Rigorous Science.Kyeong-Seop Choi - 2007 - Idealistic Studies 37 (3):203-218.
    The present paper traces the trajectory of the development of Husserl’s phenomenology from its incipient eidetic phase over the transcendental to the lifeworld-phenomenological, and ascertains that, in spite of all their complexities, the idea of Zu den Sachen selbst is the very objective of all those ‘phenomenological’investigations. The search after the ‘immediately given’ (Vorgegebenheiten) finally discovers that the concrete cultural life-worlds are the authentically ‘immediatelypre-given’ and all kinds of knowledge and sciences (higher cultural configurations) are nothing but idealizations of those (...)
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  44. What is Understanding? An Overview of Recent Debates in Epistemology and Philosophy of Science.Christoph Baumberger, Claus Beisbart & Georg Brun - 2017 - In Stephen Grimm Christoph Baumberger & Sabine Ammon (eds.), Explaining Understanding: New Perspectives from Epistemolgy and Philosophy of Science. Routledge. pp. 1-34.
    The paper provides a systematic overview of recent debates in epistemology and philosophy of science on the nature of understanding. We explain why philosophers have turned their attention to understanding and discuss conditions for “explanatory” understanding of why something is the case and for “objectual” understanding of a whole subject matter. The most debated conditions for these types of understanding roughly resemble the three traditional conditions for knowledge: truth, justification and belief. We discuss prominent views about how to (...)
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  45.  93
    Hegel’s Misunderstood Treatment of Gauss in the Science of Logic: Its Implications for His Philosophy of Mathematics.Edward Beach - 2006 - Idealistic Studies 36 (3):191-218.
    This essay explores Hegel’s treatment of Carl Friedrich Gauss’s mathematical discoveries as examples of “Analytic Cognition.” Unfortunately, Hegel’s main point has been virtually lost due to an editorial blunder tracing back almost a century, an error that has been perpetuated in many subsequent editions and translations.The paper accordingly has three sections. In the first, I expose the mistake and trace its pervasive influence in multiple languages and editions of the Wissenschaft der Logik. In the second section, I undertake to explain (...)
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  46.  7
    Historical Laws and the History and Philosophy of Science.Warren Schmaus - 1988 - Philosophie Et Culture: Actes du XVIIe Congrès Mondial de Philosophie 3:647-651.
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  47. What is General Philosophy of Science?Stathis Psillos - 2012 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 43 (1):93-103.
    The very idea of a general philosophy of science relies on the assumption that there is this thing called science —as opposed to the various individual sciences. In this programmatic piece I make a case for the claim that general philosophy of science is the philosophy of science in general or science as such. Part of my narrative makes use of history, for two reasons. First, general philosophy of science is (...)
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  48.  18
    Experimental Philosophy of Science and Philosophical Differences Across the Sciences.Brian Robinson, Chad Gonnerman & Michael O'Rourke - 2019 - Philosophy of Science 3 (86):551-576.
    This paper contributes to the underdeveloped field of experimental philosophy of science. We examine variability in the philosophical views of scientists. Using data from Toolbox Dialogue Initiative, we analyze scientists’ responses to prompts on philosophical issues (methodology, confirmation, values, reality, reductionism, and motivation for scientific research) to assess variance in the philosophical views of physical scientists, life scientists, and social and behavioral scientists. We find six prompts about which differences arose, with several more that look promising for future (...)
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  49. Topology as an Issue for History of Philosophy of Science.Thomas Mormann - 2013 - In Hanne Andersen, Dennis Dieks, Wenceslao J. Gonzalez, Thomas Uebel & Gregory Wheeler (eds.), New Challenges to Philosophy of Science. Springer. pp. 423--434.
    Since antiquity well into the beginnings of the 20th century geometry was a central topic for philosophy. Since then, however, most philosophers of science, if they took notice of topology at all, considered it as an abstruse subdiscipline of mathematics lacking philosophical interest. Here it is argued that this neglect of topology by philosophy may be conceived of as the sign of a conceptual sea-change in philosophy of science that expelled geometry, and, more generally, mathematics, (...)
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  50.  84
    The Scientific Dimensions of Social Knowledge and Their Distant Echoes in 20th-Century American Philosophy of Science.Philip Mirowski - 2004 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 35 (2):283-326.
    The widespread impression that recent philosophy of science has pioneered exploration of the “social dimensions of scientific knowledge” is shown to be in error, partly due to a lack of appreciation of historical precedent, and partly due to a misunderstanding of how the social sciences and philosophy have been intertwined over the last century. This paper argues that the referents of “democracy” are an important key in the American context, and that orthodoxies in the philosophy of (...)
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