Results for 'Corporate citizenship from A. view'

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  1. Theorising Corporate Citizenship. Jeremy Moon, Andrew Crane and Dirk Matten / Corporate Power and Responsibility : A Citizenship Perspective; Christopher Cowton / Governing the Corporate Citizen : Reflections on the Role of Professionals; Tatjana Schönwälder-Kuntze.Corporate citizenship from A. view - 2008 - In Jesús Conill Sancho, Christoph Luetge & Tatjana Schó̈nwälder-Kuntze (eds.), Corporate Citizenship, Contractarianism and Ethical Theory: On Philosophical Foundations of Business Ethics. Ashgate Pub. Company.
     
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  2.  45
    Reconciling Corporate Citizenship and Competitive Strategy: Insights From Economic Theory.Sylvia Maxfield - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 80 (2):367-377.
    Neoclassical and Austrian/evolutionary economic paradigms have different implications for integrating corporate social responsibility (corporate citizenship) and competitive strategy. porter's "Five Forces" model implicitly rests on neoclassical theory of the firm and is not easily reconciled with corporate social responsibility. Resource-based models of competitive strategy do not explicitly embrace a particular economic paradigm, but to the extent their conceptualization rests on neoclassical assumptions such as imperfect factor markets and profits as rents, these models also imply a trade-off (...)
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  3. Business Ethics, Corporate Good Citizenship and the Corporate Social Policy Process: A View From the United States. [REVIEW]Edwin M. Epstein - 1989 - Journal of Business Ethics 8 (8):583 - 595.
  4.  21
    Corporate or Governmental Duties? Corporate Citizenship From a Governmental Perspective.Janina Curbach & Michael S. Aßländer - 2017 - Business and Society 56 (4):617-645.
    Recent discussions on corporate citizenship highlight the new political role of corporations in society by arguing that corporations increasingly act as quasi-governmental actors and take on what hitherto had originally been governmental tasks. By examining political and sociological citizenship theories, the authors show that such a corporate engagement can be explained by a changing conception of corporate citizens from corporate bourgeois to corporate citoyen. As an intermediate actor in society, the corporate (...)
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  5. Business Citizenship: From Domestic to Global Level of Analysis.Jeanne M. Logsdon & Donna J. Wood - 2002 - Business Ethics Quarterly 12 (2):155-188.
    Abstract: In this article we first review the development of the concept of global business citizenship and show how the libertarian political philosophy of free-market capitalism must give way to a communitarian view in order for the voluntaristic, local notion of “corporate citizenship” to take root. We then distinguish the concept of global business citizenship fromcorporate citizenship” by showing how the former concept requires a transition from communitarian thinking to a (...)
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  6. Behind the Mask: Revealing the True Face of Corporate Citizenship[REVIEW]Dirk Matten, Andrew Crane & Wendy Chapple - 2003 - Journal of Business Ethics 45 (1-2):109 - 120.
    This paper traces the development of corporate citizenship as a way of framing business and society relations, and critically examines the content of contemporary understandings of the term. These conventional views of corporate citizenship are argued to contribute little or nothing to existing notions of corporate social responsibility and corporate philanthropy. The paper then proposes a new direction, which particularly exposes the element of "citizenship". Being a political concept, citizenship can only be (...)
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  7.  11
    Business Citizenship: From Domestic to Global Level of Analysis.Jeanne M. Logsdon & Donna J. Wood - 2002 - Business Ethics Quarterly 12 (2):155-187.
    In this article we first review the development of the concept of global business citizenship and show how the libertarian politicalphilosophy of free-market capitalism must give way to a communitarian view in order for the voluntaristic, local notion of “corporate citizenship” to take root. We then distinguish the concept of global business citizenship fromcorporate citizenship” by showing how the former concept requires a transition from communitarian thinking to a position of (...)
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  8.  39
    Social Citizenship From a Feminist Perspective.Wendy Sarvasy - 1997 - Hypatia 12 (4):54-73.
    In this article I construct a feminist notion of social citizenship from early twentieth-century feminism in the United States. Arguing that there are four aspects to the interconnection between women's citizenship and social democracy-new modes of citizenship, a socialized view of rights, new spaces for participation, and a female-privileged definition of gender equality-I suggest that such a concept could help us move from a welfare state to a feminist social democracy.
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  9.  30
    Understanding Political Responsibility in Corporate Citizenship: Towards a Shared Responsibility for the Common Good.Marcel Verweij, Vincent Blok & Tjidde Tempels - 2017 - Journal of Global Ethics 13 (1):90-108.
    ABSTRACTIn this article, we explore the debate on corporate citizenship and the role of business in global governance. In the debate on political corporate social responsibility it is assumed that under globalization business is taking up a greater political role. Apart from economic responsibilities firms assume political responsibilities taking up traditional governmental tasks such as regulation of business and provision of public goods. We contrast this with a subsidiarity-based approach to governance, in which firms are seen (...)
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  10.  9
    Moving From Geographic to Virtual Communities: Global Corporate Citizenship in a Dot.Com World.James E. Post - 2000 - Business and Society Review 105 (1):26-46.
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  11.  65
    Modeling Corporate Citizenship and Its Relationship with Organizational Citizenship Behaviors.Chieh-Peng Lin, Nyan-Myau Lyau, Yuan-Hui Tsai, Wen-Yung Chen & Chou-Kang Chiu - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 95 (3):357-372.
    Citizenship, such as corporate citizenship and organizational citizenship, has been an important issue in business management for decades. This study proposes a research model from the perspectives of social identity and resource allocation, by examining the influence of corporate citizenship on organizational citizenship behaviors (OCBs). In the model, OCBs are positively influenced by perceived legal citizenship and perceived ethical citizenship, while negatively influenced by perceived discretionary citizenship. Empirical testing using (...)
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  12. Modeling Corporate Citizenship, Organizational Trust, and Work Engagement Based on Attachment Theory.Chieh-Peng Lin - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 94 (4):517 - 531.
    This study proposes a research model based on attachment theory, which examines the role of corporate citizenship in the formation of organizational trust and work engagement. In the model, work engagement is directly influenced by four dimensions of perceived corporate citizenship, including economic, legal, ethical, and discretionary citizenship, while work engagement is also indirectly affected by perceived corporate citizenship through the mediation of organizational trust. Empirical testing using a survey of personnel from (...)
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  13.  41
    From CSR to Corporate Citizenship: Anglo-American and Continental European Perspectives.Alejo José G. Sison - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 89 (S3):235 - 246.
    Beginning with the question of who constitutes the firm, this article seeks to explore the historical evolution of concepts such as corporate social responsibility, corporate accountability, corporate social responsiveness, corporate social performance, stakeholder theory, and corporate citizenship. In close parallel to these changes are differences in interpretation from Anglo—American and Continental European perspectives. The author defends that the ultimate reasons behind these differences are of a philosophical nature, affecting both the anthropology and the (...)
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  14.  78
    Modeling Corporate Citizenship and Its Relationship with Organizational Citizenship Behaviors.Chieh-Peng Lin, Nyan-Myau Lyau, Yuan-Hui Tsai, Wen-Yung Chen & Chou-Kang Chiu - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 95 (3):357-372.
    Citizenship, such as corporate citizenship and organizational citizenship, has been an important issue in business management for decades. This study proposes a research model from the perspectives of social identity and resource allocation, by examining the influence of corporate citizenship on organizational citizenship behaviors (OCBs). In the model, OCBs are positively influenced by perceived legal citizenship and perceived ethical citizenship, while negatively influenced by perceived discretionary citizenship. Empirical testing using (...)
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  15.  23
    Corporate Sustainability: A View From the Top.Arménio Rego, Miguel Pina E. Cunha & Daniel Polónia - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 143 (1):133-157.
    Through a qualitative approach, we explore the perspective of 72 CEOs of companies operating in Portugal about the definition of corporate sustainability and its facilitators, and obtain four main findings. First, most CEOs equate CS with the company’s continuity/viability. Second, the relevance ascribed to different stakeholders differs considerably: while more than 50 % of CEOs cited shareholders/profits, and more than 40 % mentioned the natural environment and employees, very few mentioned customers, society, suppliers, the State, or competitors. Third, the (...)
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  16.  45
    Exploring Corporate Citizenship and Purchase Intention: Mediating Effects of Brand Trust and Corporate Identification.Yuan Hui Tsai, Sheng-Wuu Joe, Chieh-Peng Lin, Chou-Kang Chiu & Kuei-Tzu Shen - 2015 - Business Ethics: A European Review 24 (4):361-377.
    Corporate citizenship represents various organizational activities and status related to the organization's societal and stakeholder obligations. This study develops five different dimensions of corporate citizenship and examines the relationship between the five dimensions and purchase intention by including two key mediators. In the proposed model of this study, purchase intention is indirectly affected by economic, legal, ethical, general philanthropic, and strategic philanthropic citizenship via the mediation of corporate identification and brand trust. Empirical testing using (...)
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  17.  53
    Institutional Conditions of Corporate Citizenship.Ronald Jeurissen - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 53 (1-2):87-96.
    Exploring the concept of citizenship from the history of political philosophy provides suggestions about what corporate citizenship could mean. The metaphor of corporate citizenship suggests an institutional approach to corporate social responsibility. Citizenship is a social role, characterized by an orientation towards the social contract, collective and active responsibility, as well as a positive attitude towards the juridical state. By analogy, corporate citizenship is a social role, characterized by the social (...)
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  18.  38
    Citizen science or scientific citizenship? Disentangling the uses of public engagement rhetoric in national research initiatives.J. Patrick Woolley, Michelle L. McGowan, Harriet J. A. Teare, Victoria Coathup, Jennifer R. Fishman, Richard A. Settersten, Sigrid Sterckx, Jane Kaye & Eric T. Juengst - 2016 - BMC Medical Ethics 17 (1):1.
    The language of “participant-driven research,” “crowdsourcing” and “citizen science” is increasingly being used to encourage the public to become involved in research ventures as both subjects and scientists. Originally, these labels were invoked by volunteer research efforts propelled by amateurs outside of traditional research institutions and aimed at appealing to those looking for more “democratic,” “patient-centric,” or “lay” alternatives to the professional science establishment. As mainstream translational biomedical research requires increasingly larger participant pools, however, corporate, academic and governmental research (...)
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  19. Corporate Social Responsibility in the 21st Century: A View From the World's Most Successful Firms.Jamie Snider, Ronald Paul Hill & Diane Martin - 2003 - Journal of Business Ethics 48 (2):175-187.
    This investigation is motivated by the lack of scholarship examining the content of what firms are communicating to various stakeholders about their commitment to socially responsible behaviors. To address this query, a qualitative study of the legal, ethical and moral statements available on the websites of Forbes Magazine''s top 50 U.S. and top 50 multinational firms of non-U.S. origin were analyzed within the context of stakeholder theory. The results are presented thematically, and the close provides implications for social responsibility among (...)
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  20.  18
    The Corporation as Citoyen? Towards a New Understanding of Corporate Citizenship.Michael S. Aßländer & Janina Curbach - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 120 (4):541-554.
    Based on the extended conceptualization of corporate citizenship, as provided by Matten and Crane :166–179, 2005), this paper examines the new role of corporations in society. Taking the ideas of Matten and Crane one step further, we argue that the status of corporations as citizens is not solely defined by their factual engagement in the provision of citizenship rights to others. By analysing political and sociological citizenship theories, we show that such engagement is more adequately explained (...)
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  21.  26
    Corporate Citizenship in Developing Countries: Conceptualisations of Human-Rights-Based Evaluative Benchmarks.Rudiger Hahn - 2012 - African Journal of Business Ethics 6 (1):30.
    This article builds upon on Crane, Matten and Moon's extended view of corporate citizenship to discuss the actual and potential role of private business with regard to specific human rights in developing countries. A set of analytical benchmarks will be proposed to assess corporate behaviour with regard to these rights. A number of empirical cases illustrate the applicability and constraints of these benchmarks and help to enhance corporate citizenship thinking and theory.
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  22.  19
    When Corporations Cause Harm: A Critical View of Corporate Social Irresponsibility and Corporate Crimes.Rafael Alcadipani & Cíntia Rodrigues de Oliveira Medeiros - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 167 (2):285-297.
    Corporations perform actions that can inflict harm with different levels of intensity, from death to material loss, to both companies’ internal and external stakeholders. Research has analysed corporate harm using the notions of corporate social irresponsibility and corporate crime. Critical management studies have been subjecting management and organizational practices and knowledge to critical analysis, and corporate harm has been one of the main concerns of CMS. However, CMS has rarely been deployed to analyse CSIR and (...)
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  23.  54
    Business Citizenship.Donna J. Wood - 2002 - Business Ethics Quarterly 12 (2):155-187.
    In this article we first review the development of the concept of global business citizenship and show how the libertarian politicalphilosophy of free-market capitalism must give way to a communitarian view in order for the voluntaristic, local notion of “corporate citizenship” to take root. We then distinguish the concept of global business citizenship fromcorporate citizenship” by showing how the former concept requires a transition from communitarian thinking to a position of (...)
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  24.  75
    Modeling the Relationship Among Perceived Corporate Citizenship, Firms' Attractiveness, and Career Success Expectation.Chieh-Peng Lin, Yuan-Hui Tsai, Sheng-Wuu Joe & Chou-Kang Chiu - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 105 (1):83-93.
    Drawing on propositions from the signaling theory and expectancy theory, this study hypothesizes that the perceived corporate citizenship of job seekers positively affects a firm’s attractiveness and career success expectation. This study’s proposed research hypotheses are empirically tested using a survey of graduating MBA students seeking a job. The empirical findings show that a firm’s corporate citizenship provides a competitive advantage in attracting job seekers and fostering optimistic career success expectation. Such findings substantially complement the (...)
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  25.  48
    Modeling the Relationship Between Perceived Corporate Citizenship and Organizational Commitment Considering Organizational Trust as a Moderator.Yi-Ju Wang, Yuan-Hui Tsai & Chieh-Peng Lin - 2013 - Business Ethics, the Environment and Responsibility 22 (2):218-233.
    This study proposes a research model based on social identity theory, which examines the moderating role of organizational trust on the relationship between corporate citizenship and organizational commitment. In the model, organizational commitment is positively influenced by organizational trust and four dimensions of perceived corporate citizenship, including economic, legal, ethical and discretionary citizenship. The model paths are hypothesized to be moderated by organizational trust. Empirical testing using a survey of personnel from 12 large firms (...)
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  26.  61
    Beyond Philanthropy: Community Enterprise as a Basis for Corporate Citizenship.Paul Tracey, Nelson Phillips & Helen Haugh - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 58 (4):327-344.
    In this article we argue that the emergence of a new form of organization – community enterprise – provides an alternative mechanism for corporations to behave in socially responsible ways. Community enterprises are distinguished from other third sector organisations by their generation of income through trading, rather than philanthropy and/or government subsidy, to finance their social goals. They also include democratic governance structures which allow members of the community or constituency they serve to participate in the management of the (...)
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  27.  16
    Engineering Students’ Views of Corporate Social Responsibility: A Case Study From Petroleum Engineering.Jessica M. Smith, Carrie J. McClelland & Nicole M. Smith - 2017 - Science and Engineering Ethics 23 (6):1775-1790.
    The mining and energy industries present unique challenges to engineers, who must navigate sometimes competing responsibilities and codes of conduct, such as personal senses of right and wrong, professional ethics codes, and their employers’ corporate social responsibility policies. Corporate social responsibility is the current dominant framework used by industry to conceptualize firms’ responsibilities to their stakeholders, yet has it plays a relatively minor role in engineering ethics education. In this article, we report on an interdisciplinary pedagogical intervention in (...)
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  28. Extended Corporate Citizenship: A Libertarian Interpretation.Jukka Makinen & Petri Rasanen - 2011 - Electronic Journal of Business Ethics and Organization Studies 16 (2):6-11.
    We argue that the idea of ECC is more in line with libertarian than liberal thinking. The basic idea of ECC is the dislocation of the provider of citizenship rights from governments to corporations: corporations provide and administrate the same citizenship rights, which governments provided earlier, before the political processes started the privatization of these entitlements . According to John Rawls’ liberal viewpoint, citizens’ relations to the public structures of society are supposed to be fundamentally different (...) their relations to private associations like business corporations. In libertarian thinking , instead, citizens relations to public institutions do not significantly differ from their relations to business corporations. Both are based on voluntary agreements, bringing forth the idea of a contract-society. Since ECC is backed up by this kind of contractsociety, it brings forth libertarian interpretations of the most central political matters - like the basic structure of society, and the concepts of freedom and democracy. (shrink)
     
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  29. The Curious Case of Corporate Tax Avoidance: Is It Socially Irresponsible?Grahame R. Dowling - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 124 (1):1-12.
    In contrast to many aspects of the social responsibility of business, CSR scholarship has been largely silent on the issue of the payment of corporate tax. This is curious because such tax payments are often considered a fundamental and easily measured example of a company’s citizenship behavior. However, because the payment of corporate tax can often be legally avoided, this activity represents a boundary condition for CSR. If the law and CSR suggest that a company should pay (...)
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  30.  12
    Corporate Responses to HIV/AIDS: Experience and Leadership From South Africa.Pamela L. Bolton - 2008 - Business and Society Review 113 (2):277-300.
    ABSTRACTHIV/AIDS harms the viability and competitiveness of African businesses. As a consequence, companies increasingly subscribe to the view that taking a proactive role to combat HIV/AIDS is not simply a question of compassion and good corporate citizenship. Rather, these firms see assertive action against HIV as critical to their long‐term profitability, and some have concluded that it is cost effective even in the short term. The article discusses how South African companies are taking action against HIV in (...)
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  31.  66
    Can an Sme Become a Global Corporate Citizen? Evidence From a Case Study.Heidi Weltzien Hoivivonk & Domènec Melé - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 88 (S3):551-563.
    Global Corporate Citizenship (GCC) continues to become increasingly popular in large corporations. However, this concept has rarely been considered in small and medium size enterprises (SMEs). A case study of a Norwegian clothing company illustrates how GCC can be also applied to small companies. This case study also shows that SMEs can be very innovative in exercising corporate citizenship, without necessarily following the patterns of large multinational companies. The company studied engages as partner in some voluntary (...)
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  32.  35
    The Spanish Discourse on Corporate Social Responsibility.Natàlia Cantó-Milà & Josep M. Lozano - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 87 (1):157 - 171.
    The discourse on CRS began late in Spain. Its permeation into political institutions also began later than in many Western countries. The Spanish government neither contributed nor reacted to the green paper Corporate social responsibility. A business contribution sustainable development, published by the European Commission in 2002. However, the publication of this document gave the definitive impulse for the start of the Spanish debate on CSR. After this initial impulse, the debate rapidly developed into a consolidated field of discourse. (...)
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  33.  13
    Industrial Citizenship, Social Citizenship, Corporate Citizenship: I Just Want My Wages.Guy Mundlak - 2007 - Theoretical Inquiries in Law 8 (2):719-748.
    The Article critically examines the adaptation of citizenship rights to industrial relations and labor law. Starting with T.H. Marshall’s discussion of industrial citizenship, the Article examines the coupling of industrial citizenship with trade unions. While Marshall’s concept of industrial citizenship may seem to be in decline, other labor market institutions are trying to bridge the divide between citizenship and labor rights: workplace democracy, which assumes the constituency of workers in the corporation; and corporate (...), which is used to entrust corporations with obligations that are traditionally expected of human citizens. Citizenship’s contribution to the analysis of labor market institutions lies in the emphasis on the public nature of workers’ rights, in the association of rights with obligations, and in the emphasis on active participation. However, citizenship also has "blind spots" that other theories address more coherently. Human rights are a preferred concept for distinguishing fundamental rights from "ordinary" rights. Labor rights are more effective in identifying power structures that citizenship rights may overlook. Consequently, the concept of citizenship may compromise workers’ capacity to negotiate fair remuneration, protection from dismissal and the dignity of labor. (shrink)
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  34.  34
    Corporate Governance, Internal Decision Making, and the Invisible Hand.O. Scott Stovall, John D. Neill & David Perkins - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 51 (2):221-227.
    Proponents of the dominant contemporary model of corporate governance maintain that the shareholder is the primary constituent of the firm. The responsibility for managerial decision makers in this governance system is to maximize shareholder wealth. Neoclassical economists ethically justify this objective with their interpretation of Adam Smith's notion of the Invisible Hand. Using a famous quotation from The Wealth of Nations, they interpret the Invisible Hand as Smith's (An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of (...)
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  35.  11
    Capabilities in, Capabilities Out: Overcoming Digital Divides by Promoting Corporate Citizenship and Fair ICT. [REVIEW]Thorsten Busch - 2011 - Ethics and Information Technology 13 (4):339-353.
    This conceptual article discusses strategies of corporations in the information and communication technologies (ICT) sector and their role in the conflict over access to knowledge in the digital environment. Its main hypothesis is that ICT corporations are very capable actors when it comes to bridging digital divides in both developed and developing countries—maybe even the most capable actors. Therefore, it is argued that ICT corporations could use their capabilities to help citizens gain sustainable access to knowledge in order to enable (...)
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  36.  68
    From an Implicit Christian Corporate Culture to a Structured Conception of Corporate Ethical Responsibility in a Retail Company: A Case-Study in Hermeneutic Ethics. [REVIEW]Geert Demuijnck - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 84 (S3):387-404.
    This article presents a qualitative research about the way in which business leaders of a retail company gradually clarify the ethical responsibilities of their company – in an ongoing discussion of particular cases. It is based on 12 years of experience as an external member of the ethics committee. The aim of the article is not so much as to evaluate the different single decisions that were made and implemented to make the company meet high ethical standards, but rather to (...)
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  37.  50
    Corporations and Citizenship Arenas in the Age of Social Media.Glen Whelan, Jeremy Moon & Bettina Grant - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 118 (4):777-790.
    Little attention has been paid to the importance of social media in the corporate social responsibility (CSR) literature. This deficit is redressed in the present paper through utilizing the notion of ‘citizenship arenas’ to identify three dynamics in social media-augmented corporate–society relations. First, we note that social media-augmented ‘corporate arenas of citizenship’ are constructed by individual corporations in an effort to address CSR issues of specific importance thereto, and are populated by individual citizens as well (...)
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  38.  49
    Toward Dynamic Corporate Stakeholder Responsibility: From Corporate Social Responsibility Toward a Comprehensive and Dynamic View of Corporate Stakeholder Responsibility.Sybille Sachs & Marc Maurer - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 85 (S3):535-544.
    Today, sustainable relations with a broad range of key stakeholders are not only important from a normative business ethics perspective, but also from an entrepreneurial viewpoint to allow and support the long-term survival of a firm. We will argue that the traditional conception of a firm’s corporate social responsibility does not reflect this view and that a comprehensive and dynamic conception of a firm’s responsibilities is necessary to map the reality of business practice and to manage (...)
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  39.  41
    Responsible Leadership Outcomes Via Stakeholder CSR Values: Testing a Values-Centered Model of Transformational Leadership. [REVIEW]Kevin S. Groves & Michael A. LaRocca - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 98 (S1):37-55.
    A values-centered leadership model comprised of leader stakeholder and economic values, follower values congruence, and responsible leadership outcomes was tested using data from 122 organizational leaders and 458 of their direct reports. Alleviating same-source bias concerns in leadership survey research, follower ratings of leadership style and follower ratings of values congruence and responsible leadership outcomes were collected from separate sources via the split-sample methodology. Results of structural equation modeling analyses demonstrated that leader stakeholder values predicted transformational leadership, whereas (...)
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  40.  84
    Globalising Citizenship Education? A Critique of 'Global Education' and 'Citizenship Education'.Ian Davies, Mark Evans & Alan Reid - 2005 - British Journal of Educational Studies 53 (1):66 - 89.
    This article discusses, principally from an English perspective, globalisation, global citizenship and two forms of education relevant to those developments (global education and citizenship education). We describe what citizenship has meant inside one nation state and ask what citizenship means, and could mean, in a globalising world. By comparing the natures of citizenship education and global education, as experienced principally in England during, approximately, the last three decades, we seek to develop a clearer understanding (...)
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  41.  79
    Corporate Social Responsibility: Views From the Frontline.Lisa Whitehouse - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 63 (3):279-296.
    This paper offers an evaluation of corporate policy and practice in respect of corporate social responsibility (CSR) deriving from an analysis of qualitative data, obtained during semi-structured interviews with the representatives of 16 companies from a variety of UK sectors including retail, mining, financial services and mobile telephony. The findings of the empirical survey are presented in five sections that trace chronologically the process of CSR policy development. The first identifies the meaning attributed to CSR by (...)
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  42.  5
    In Search of a Common Ethical Ground: Corporate Environmental Responsibility a From the Perspective of Christian.Georges Enderle - 1997 - Journal of Business Ethics 16 (2):173-181.
    In recent years, corporate environmental policies have become urgently needed, demanded by influential environmentalist groups and launched by an increasing number of companies. Those demands and efforts, however, often lack an ethical underpinning. This paper deals with some basic ethical issues and outlines three perspectives for further investigation: How can we take into account ethical pluralism that characterizes most contemporary societies?; What is the content of environmental ethics viewed from a Christian perspective, taken as an example of various (...)
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  43.  4
    Memory from a pragmatic point of view: intersections of Merleau-Ponty and Francisco Varela.Arthur Araujo - 2021 - Cognitio 21 (2):203-230.
    Tendo como fundo uma concepção pragmática de memória como fazer sem representar, o artigo explora a interseção entre Merleau-Ponty e Varela na qual a noção de condição corporal assume uma função distintiva. A ideia é que a memória depende da condição corporal como um todo e, por consequência, nada tem a ver com representação. O objetivo do artigo pode ser resumido nos seguintes termos: para um organismo, pragmaticamente, é vital saber como fazer coisas com suas memórias mais do que torná-las (...)
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    Globalising Citizenship Education? A Critique of ‘Global Education’ and ‘Citizenship Education’.Ian Davies, Mark Evans & Alan Reid - 2005 - British Journal of Educational Studies 53 (1):66-89.
    This article discusses, principally from an English perspective, globalisation, global citizenship and two forms of education relevant to those developments. We describe what citizenship has meant inside one nation state and ask what citizenship means, and could mean, in a globalising world. By comparing the natures of citizenship education and global education, as experienced principally in England during, approximately, the last three decades, we seek to develop a clearer understanding of what has been done and (...)
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  45. Kant's Cosmopolitan Law: World Citizenship for a Global Order.Pauline Kleingeld - 1998 - Kantian Review 2:72-90.
    Kant's unduly neglected concept of cosmopolitan law suggests a third sphere of public law -- in addition to constitutional law and international law -- in which both states and individuals have rights, and where individuals have these rights as ‛citizens of the earth' rather than as citizens of particular states. I critically examine Kant's view of cosmopolitan law, discussing its addressees, content, justification, and institutionalization. I argue that Kant's conception of ‛world citizenship' is neither merely metaphorical nor dependent (...)
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  46.  63
    Corporate Environmental Citizenship Variation in Developing Countries: An Institutional Framework.Şükrü Özen & Fatma Küskü - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 89 (2):297-313.
    This study focuses on why some companies in developing countries go beyond environmental regulations when implementing their corporate environmental social responsibilities or citizenship behavior. Drawing mainly upon the new institutional theory, this study develops a conceptual framework to explain three institutional factors: companies’ market orientations, industrial characteristics, and corporate identities. Accordingly, we suggest that companies from developing countries that are oriented to markets in developed countries, operate in highly concentrated industries, and have missionary identities adopt (...) environmental citizenship behavior by going beyond environmental regulations. The study also discusses the theoretical, policy, and managerial implications of the conceptual framework. (shrink)
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  47.  23
    The Chief Officer of Corporate Social Responsibility: A Study of Its Presence in Top Management Teams. [REVIEW]Robert Strand - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 112 (4):721-734.
    I present a review of the top management teams (TMTs) of the largest public corporations in the U.S. and Scandinavia (one thousand in total) to identify corporations that have a TMT position with “corporate social responsibility” (CSR) or a “CSR synonym” like sustainability or citizenship explicitly included in the position title. Through this I present three key findings. First, I establish that a number of CSR TMT positions exist and I list all identified corporations and associated position titles. (...)
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    How and When Compulsory Citizenship Behavior Leads to Employee Silence: A Moderated Mediation Model Based on Moral Disengagement and Supervisor–Subordinate Guanxi Views.Peixu He, Zhenglong Peng, Hongdan Zhao & Christophe Estay - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 155 (1):259-274.
    Prior research on citizenship behavior has mainly focused on its voluntary side—organizational citizenship behavior. Unfortunately, although compulsory behavior is a global organizational phenomenon, the involuntary side of CB—compulsory citizenship behavior, defined as employees’ involuntary engagement in extra-role work activities that are beneficial to the organization : 77–93, 2006)—has long been neglected and very little is known about its potential negative consequences. Particularly, research on CCB–counterproductive work behavior association is still in its nascent stage. Therefore, drawing on moral (...)
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    Empowering Women Through Corporate Social Responsibility: A Feminist Foucauldian Critique.Lauren McCarthy - 2017 - Business Ethics Quarterly 27 (4):603-631.
    ABSTRACT:Corporate social responsibility has been hailed as a new means to address gender inequality, particularly by facilitating women’s empowerment. Women are frequently and forcefully positioned as saviours of economies or communities and proponents of sustainability. Using vignettes drawn from a CSR women’s empowerment programme in Ghana, this conceptual article explores unexpected programme outcomes enacted by women managers and farmers. It is argued that a feminist Foucauldian reading of power as relational and productive can help explain this since those (...)
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    [Book Review] Moral Responsibility and the Boundaries of Community, Power and Accountability From a Pragmatic Point of View[REVIEW]Marion Smiley - 1994 - Social Theory and Practice 20 (2):203-220.
    The question of responsibility plays a critical role not only in our attempts to resolve social and political problems, but in our very conceptions of what those problems are. Who, for example, is to blame for apartheid in South Africa? Is the South African government responsible? What about multinational corporations that do business there? Will uncovering the "true facts of the matter" lead us to the right answer? In an argument both compelling and provocative, Marion Smiley demonstrates how attributions of (...)
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