Results for 'Corporate objective function'

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  1.  97
    Value Maximization, Stakeholder Theory, and the Corporate Objective Function.Michael C. Jensen - 2002 - Business Ethics Quarterly 12 (2):235-256.
    Abstract: In this article, I offer a proposal to clarify what I believe is the proper relation between value maximization and stakeholder theory, which I call enlightened value maximization. Enlightened value maximization utilizes much of the structure of stakeholder theory but accepts maximization of the long-run value of the firm as the criterion for making the requisite tradeoffs among its stakeholders, and specifies long-term value maximization or value seeking as the firm’s objective. This proposal therefore solves the problems that (...)
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  2.  41
    Beyond the Bounded Instrumentality in Current Corporate Sustainability Research: Toward an Inclusive Notion of Profitability. [REVIEW]Tobias Hahn & Frank Figge - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 104 (3):325-345.
    We argue that the majority of the current approaches in research on corporate sustainability are inconsistent with the notion of sustainable development. By defining the notion of instrumentality in the context of corporate sustainability through three conceptual principles we show that current approaches are rooted in a bounded notion of instrumentality which establishes a systematic a priori predominance of economic organizational outcomes over environmental and social aspects. We propose an inclusive notion of profitability that reflects the return on (...)
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  3. The Corporate Objective After eBay V. Newmark.John R. Boatright - 2017 - Business and Society Review 122 (1):51-70.
    The Delaware court's decision in eBay v. Newmark has been viewed by many commentators as a decisive affirmation of shareholder wealth maximization as the only legally permissible objective of a for-profit corporation. The implications of this court case are of particular concern for the emerging field of social enterprise, in which some organizations, such as, in this case, Craigslist, choose to pursue a social benefit mission in the for-profit corporate form. The eBay v. Newmark decision may also threaten (...)
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  4.  29
    Communicating Corporate Responsibility to Investors: The Changing Role of the Investor Relations Function[REVIEW]Kai Hockerts & Lance Moir - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 52 (1):85-98.
    Based on an inductive study we analyse the role of the investor relations (IR) function in the light of rising investor concern about corporate social responsibility (CSR). The study draws on interviews with IR professionals in twenty firms. It highlights their awareness of CSR issues as well as their assessment of concern among mainstream investors and socially responsible investors (SRIs). From these findings we develop suggestions on how the IR function is moving from a mere “broadcasting” mode (...)
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  5.  3
    A Novel of Fuzzy PSS Based on New Objective Function in Multimachine Power System.Adel Akbarimajd & Nasser Yousefi - 2016 - Complexity 21 (6):288-298.
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  6.  2
    Strategic Management Accounting Corporate Objective and Production Strategy.O. O. Leonard, A. U. Ndukwe & I. Madumere - 2007 - Sophia: An African Journal of Philosophy 9 (1).
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  7.  45
    A Social Contract Account for CSR as an Extended Model of Corporate Governance (I): Rational Bargaining and Justification. [REVIEW]Lorenzo Sacconi - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 68 (3):259 - 281.
    This essay seeks to give a contractarian foundation to the concept of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), meant as an extended model of corporate governance of the firm. It focuses on justification according to the contractarian point of view (leaving compliance and implementation problems to a related article, [Sacconi 2004b, forthcoming in the Journal of Business Ethics]). It begins by providing a definition of CSR as an extended model of corporate governance, based on the fiduciary duties owed to (...)
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  8.  2
    A Social Contract Account for CSR as an Extended Model of Corporate Governance : Rational Bargaining and Justification.Lorenzo Sacconi - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 68 (3):259-281.
    This essay seeks to give a contractarian foundation to the concept of Corporate Social Responsibility, meant as an extended model of corporate governance of the firm. It focuses on justification according to the contractarian point of view. It begins by providing a definition of CSR as an extended model of corporate governance, based on the fiduciary duties owed to all the firm's stakeholders. Then, by establishing the basic context of incompleteness of contracts and abuse of authority, it (...)
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  9.  7
    Primary Stimulus Generalization of the Gsr as a Function of Objective and Subjective Definition of the Stimulus Dimension.Kenneth R. Burstein, Seymour Epstein & Barry D. Smith - 1967 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 74 (1):124-131.
  10. Stakeholder Happiness Enhancement: A Neo-Utilitarian Objective for the Modern Corporation.Thomas M. Jones & Will Felps - 2013 - Business Ethics Quarterly 23 (3):349-379.
    Employing utilitarian criteria, Jones and Felps, in “Shareholder Wealth Maximization and Social Welfare: A Utilitarian Critique”, examined the sequential logic leading from shareholder wealth maximization to maximal social welfare and uncovered several serious empirical and conceptual shortcomings. After rendering shareholder wealth maximization seriously compromised as an objective for corporate operations, they provided a set of criteria regarding what a replacement corporate objective would look like, but do not offer a specific alternative. In this article, we draw (...)
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  11.  2
    Attribution of Success as a Function of Locus of Control and Objective Self-Awareness.Charles S. Carver - 1976 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 7 (4):358-360.
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  12.  11
    Stakeholder Happiness Enhancement.Thomas M. Jones & Will Felps - 2013 - Business Ethics Quarterly 23 (3):349-379.
    Employing utilitarian criteria, Jones and Felps, in “Shareholder Wealth Maximization and Social Welfare: A Utilitarian Critique” (Business Ethics Quarterly 23[2]: 207–38), examined the sequential logic leading from shareholder wealth maximization to maximal social welfare and uncovered several serious empirical and conceptual shortcomings. After rendering shareholder wealth maximization seriously compromised as an objective for corporate operations, they provided a set of criteria regarding what a replacement corporate objective would look like, but do not offer a specific alternative. (...)
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  13. The Impact of Human Resource Management on Corporate Social Performance Strengths and Concerns.Sandra Rothenberg, Clyde Eiríkur Hull & Zhi Tang - 2017 - Business and Society 56 (3):391-418.
    Although high-performance human resource practices do not directly affect corporate social performance strengths, they do positively affect CSP strengths in companies that are highly innovative or have high levels of slack. High-performance human resource management practices also directly and negatively affect CSP concerns. Drawing on the resource-based view and using secondary data from an objective, third-party database, the authors develop and test hypotheses about how high-performance HRM affects a company’s CSP strengths and concerns. Findings suggest that HRM and (...)
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  14.  52
    Researches in Corporate Social Responsibility: A Review of Shifting Focus, Paradigms, and Methodologies. [REVIEW]Shallini S. Taneja, Pawan Kumar Taneja & Rajen K. Gupta - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 101 (3):343-364.
    Owing to the growing academic and practitioner’s interest in the field of Corporate Social Responsibility, there is a need to do a comprehensive assessment and synthesis of research activities. This article addresses this need and examines the academic literature on Corporate Social Responsibility and Performance using a paradigmatic and methodological lens. The objective of this article is fourfold. First, it examines the status of CSR research from its beginning especially after 1970 to year 2008 in leading academic (...)
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  15.  11
    Corporate Fraud and Managers' Behavior: Evidence From the Press. [REVIEW]Jeffrey Cohen, Yuan Ding, Cédric Lesage & Hervé Stolowy - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 95 (2):271 - 315.
    Based on evidence from press articles covering 39 corporate fraud cases that went public during the period 1992-2005, the objective of this article is to examine the role of managers' behavior in the commitment of the fraud. This study integrates the fraud triangle (FT) and the theory of planned behavior (TPB) to gain a better understanding of fraud cases. The results of the analysis suggest that personality traits appear to be a major fraud-risk factor. The analysis was further (...)
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  16. Aristotle's Argument for a Human Function.Rachel Barney - 2008 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 34:293-322.
    A generally ignored feature of Aristotle’s famous function argument is its reliance on the claim that practitioners of the crafts (technai) have functions: but this claim does important work. Aristotle is pointing to the fact that we judge everyday rational agency and agents by norms which are independent of their contingent desires: a good doctor is not just one who happens to achieve his personal goals through his work. But, Aristotle argues, such norms can only be binding on individuals (...)
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  17.  33
    Measuring Corporate Performance by Building on the Stakeholders Model of Business Ethics.M. Joseph Sirgy - 2002 - Journal of Business Ethics 35 (3):143 - 162.
    The main thesis guiding the conceptual development of our corporate performance measurement model is that business success – defined as long-term survival and growth – is determined by relationship quality (1) among the various organizational departments (internal stakeholders), (2) between internal and external stakeholders, and (3) between internal and distal stakeholders. Relationship quality among internal stakeholders is conceptualized and operationalized in terms of internal service quality. Relationship quality between internal and external stakeholders is conceptualized and operationalized in terms of (...)
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  18. Complexity Biology-Based Information Structures Can Explain Subjectivity, Objective Reduction of Wave Packets, and Non-Computability.Alex Hankey - 2014 - Cosmos and History 10 (1):237-250.
    Background: how mind functions is subject to continuing scientific discussion. A simplistic approach says that, since no convincing way has been found to model subjective experience, mind cannot exist. A second holds that, since mind cannot be described by classical physics, it must be described by quantum physics. Another perspective concerns mind's hypothesized ability to interact with the world of quanta: it should be responsible for reduction of quantum wave packets; physics producing 'Objective Reduction' is postulated to form the (...)
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  19.  18
    On the Ethics of Corporate Social Responsibility – Considering the Paradigm of Industrial Metabolism.Jouni Korhonen - 2003 - Journal of Business Ethics 48 (4):301-315.
    This paper attempts to bridge business ethics to corporate social responsibility including the social and environmental dimensions. The objective of the paper is to suggest a conceptual methodology with which ethics of corporate environmental management tools can be considered. The method includes two stages that are required for a shift away from the current dominant unsustainable paradigm and toward a more sustainable paradigm. The first stage is paradigmatic, metaphoric and normative. The second stage is a practical stage, (...)
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  20.  21
    Corporate Citizenship: How to Strengthen the Social Responsibility of Managers? [REVIEW]Kor Grit - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 53 (1-2):97-106.
    Corporate citizenship challenges the foundations and working of the basic institutions market, state and civil society. These institutional changes complicate the work of the manager, because the responsibilities of management are not only increasing, they are also becoming vaguer and more elusive. In this paper, I will analyze the new, complex responsibilities of management in terms of the scope and the legitimizationof corporate citizenship. What may we expect of individual organizations? Which wishes of which stakeholders should be honored? (...)
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  21.  29
    The Impact of Ethical Leadership, the Internal Audit Function, and Moral Intensity on a Financial Reporting Decision.Barbara Arel, Cathy A. Beaudoin & Anna M. Cianci - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 109 (3):351-366.
    Two elements of corporate governance—the strength of ethical executive leadership and the internal audit function (IAF hereafter)—provide guidance to accounting managers making decisions involving uncertainty. We examine the joint effect of these two factors, manipulated at two levels (strong, weak), in an experiment in which accounting professionals decide whether to book a questionable journal entry (i.e., a journal entry for which a reasonable business case can be made but there is no supporting documentation). We find that ethical leadership (...)
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  22.  28
    Corporate Social Responsibility of the Most Highly Reputed European and North American Firms.Ladislao Luna Sotorrío & José Luis Fernández Sánchez - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 82 (2):379-390.
    The objective of this article is double: first, to analyze, using a descriptive analysis, the main differences in the level and components of social behaviour between European and North American firms and, second, to contrast empirically, using a multiple linear regression model, whether the motives behind corporate social behaviour are different depending on the region or country of the firm. With this aim, an indicator of social behaviour (termed effort in sustainability) has been constructed by aggregating the firm's (...)
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  23.  23
    Measuring Corporate Social and Environmental Performance: The Extended Life-Cycle Assessment.Caroline Gauthier - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 59 (1-2):199-206.
    This papers attempts to bridge business ethics to corporate social responsibility including the social and environmental dimensions. The objective of the paper is to suggest an improvement of the most commonly used corporate environmental management tool, the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA). The method includes two stages. First, more phases are added to the life-cycle of a product. Second, social criteria that measure the social performance of a product are introduced. An application of this “extended” LCA tool is (...)
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  24.  11
    Corporate Humanistic Responsibility: Social Performance Through Managerial Discretion of the HRM.Stéphanie Arnaud & David M. Wasieleski - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 120 (3):1-22.
    The Corporate Social Performance (CSP) model (Wood, Acad Manag Rev 164:691–718, 1991) assesses a firm’s social responsibility at three levels of analysis—institutional, organizational and individual—and measures the resulting social outcomes. In this paper, we focus on the individual level of CSP, manifested in the managerial discretion of a firm’s principles, processes, and policies regarding social responsibilities. Specifically, we address the human resources management of employees as a way of promoting CSR values and producing socially minded outcomes. We show that (...)
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  25.  12
    Corporate Social Responsibility in Agribusiness: Literature Review and Future Research Directions.Henrike Luhmann & Ludwig Theuvsen - 2016 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 29 (4):673-696.
    Changes in social framework conditions, accelerated by globalization or political inventions, have created new societal demands and requirements on companies. The concept of corporate social responsibility is often considered a potential tool for meeting societal demands and criticism as a company voluntarily takes responsibility for society. The spotlight of public attention has only recently come to focus on agribusiness-related aspects of CSR. It is therefore the objective of this paper to provide an overview and a critical examination of (...)
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  26.  35
    A Global Analysis of Corporate Social Performance: The Effects of Cultural and Geographic Environments. [REVIEW]Foo Nin Ho, Hui-Ming Deanna Wang & Scott J. Vitell - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 107 (4):423-433.
    As more and more multi-national companies expand their operations globally, their responsibilities extend beyond not only the economic motive of profitability but also other social and environmental factors. The objective of this article is to examine the impact of national culture and geographic environment on firms’ corporate social performance (CSP). Empirical tests are based on a global CSP database of companies from 49 countries. Results show that the Hofstede’s cultural dimensions are significantly associated with CSP. In addition, European (...)
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  27.  76
    Assessing Arms Makers' Corporate Social Responsibility.Edmund F. Byrne - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 74 (3):201 - 217.
    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) has become a focal point for research aimed at extending business ethics to extra-corporate issues; and as a result many companies now seek to at least appear dedicated to one or another version of CSR. This has not affected the arms industry, however. For, this industry has not been discussed in CSR literature, perhaps because few CSR scholars have questioned this industry's privileged status as an instrument of national sovereignty. But major changes in the (...)
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  28.  20
    Social Engineering as an Infringement of the Presumption of Innocence: The Case of Corporate Criminality. [REVIEW]Douglas Husak - 2014 - Criminal Law and Philosophy 8 (2):353-369.
    I examine how deferred-prosecution agreements employed against suspected corporate criminality amount to a form of social engineering that infringes the presumption. I begin with a broad understanding of the presumption itself. Then I offer a brief description of how these agreements function. Finally I address some of the normative issues that must be confronted if legal philosophers who hold retributivist views on punishment and sentencing hope to assess this device. My judgment tends to be favorable. More importantly, I (...)
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  29.  57
    On the Definition of Objective Probabilities by Empirical Similarity.Itzhak Gilboa, Offer Lieberman & David Schmeidler - 2010 - Synthese 172 (1):79 - 95.
    We suggest to define objective probabilities by similarity-weighted empirical frequencies, where more similar cases get a higher weight in the computation of frequencies. This formula is justified intuitively and axiomatically, but raises the question, which similarity function should be used? We propose to estimate the similarity function from the data, and thus obtain objective probabilities. We compare this definition to others, and attempt to delineate the scope of situations in which objective probabilities can be used.
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  30.  23
    Corporate Social Responsibility for SMEs: A Proposed Hypothesised Model.Venter E. Turyakira P. - 2012 - African Journal of Business Ethics 6 (2):106.
    In a competitive, globalised world, corporate social responsibility (CSR) is proposed as a strategy to invigorate the competitiveness of small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). The primary objective of this paper is to identify CSR factors that influence the competitiveness of SMEs and to develop a hypothesised model that can be tested on SMEs. Although SMEs in Uganda are increasingly becoming the backbone of the economy, their rate of survival and competitiveness are a cause for concern. The outcomes of (...)
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  31.  19
    Performance Analysis of Sustainable Investments in the Brazilian Stock Market: A Study About the Corporate Sustainability Index (ISE). [REVIEW]Felipe Arias Fogliano de Souza Cunha & Carlos Patricio Samanez - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 117 (1):19-36.
    In this article, we studied the Corporate Sustainability Index (ISE) of the Brazilian Mercantile, Futures and Stock Exchange (BM&FBOVESPA), with the main objective of analyzing the performance of sustainable investments in the Brazilian stock market, during the period from December 2005 to December 2010. To achieve this aim, we characterized ISE portfolios and we compared its performance with the IBOVESPA (representing the market portfolio) and other BM&FBOVESPA sectoral indices. In the performance comparison, we used level of liquidity, return (...)
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  32.  14
    Corporate Social Responsibility for SMEs: A Proposed Hypothesised Model.P. Turyakira, E. Venter & E. Smith - 2012 - African Journal of Business Ethics 6 (2):106.
    In a competitive, globalised world, corporate social responsibility (CSR) is proposed as a strategy to invigorate the competitiveness of small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). The primary objective of this paper is to identify CSR factors that influence the competitiveness of SMEs and to develop a hypothesised model that can be tested on SMEs. Although SMEs in Uganda are increasingly becoming the backbone of the economy, their rate of survival and competitiveness are a cause for concern. The outcomes of (...)
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  33.  17
    A Case Study of Infant Health Promotion and Corporate Marketing of Milk Substitutes.Roger Lee Mendoza - 2012 - Health Care Analysis 20 (2):196-211.
    The mismatch between the demand for, and supply of, health products has led to the increasing involvement of courts worldwide in health promotion and marketing. This study critically examines the implementation of one country’s Milk Code within the framework of the International Code of Marketing of Breast-Milk Substitutes, and the efficacy of the judicial process in balancing corporate marketing and state regulatory objectives. Drawing upon the Philippine experience with its own Milk Code, it evaluates the capacities of courts to (...)
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  34.  9
    Ethics and Corporate Social Responsibility in Latin American Small and Medium Sized Enterprises: Challenging Development.M. C. Arruda - 2009 - African Journal of Business Ethics 4 (2):37.
    Considering the lack of substantive scientific or theoretical studies about ethics in small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) in Latin America, this paper examines the context of an existent paradox, based upon the perspective of experts and academicians of Latin America and the Caribbean. These countries live different realities, due to their respective European cultural influences, as well as to racial and economic issues. Such facts impact the size and characteristics of their industries. On the other hand, the SMEs face (...)
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  35.  43
    Moral Mazes: The World of Corporate Managers.Robert Jackall - 1988 - Oxford University Press.
    What is right in the corporation is not what is right in a man's home or in his church," a former vice-president of a large firm observes. "What is right in the corporation is what the guy above you wants from you." Such sentiments pervade American society, from corporate boardrooms to the basement of the White House. In Moral Mazes, Robert Jackall offers an eye-opening account of how corporate managers think the world works, and of how big organizations (...)
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  36. The Balanced Company: A Theory of Corporate Integrity.Muel Kaptein - 2002 - Oxford University Press.
    This book contains a cohesive overview of the most important theories and insights in the field of business ethics. At the same time, it further tailors these theories to the situation in which organizations function, presenting criteria that can be used to measure, assess, improve and report on corporate integrity.
     
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  37.  11
    Partner Selection for Corporate Social Responsibility Efforts: The Case of Choosing NGO Partners.Douglas K. Peterson - 2007 - International Corporate Responsibility Series 3:173-187.
    The objective of this paper is to suggest types of analysis that can help managers effectively choose NGO partners that help them meet their international corporate sustainability and social responsibility goals. NGO partner choices should offer a good fit to corporate goals/objectives and create opportunities to reap the benefits of social responsibility and sustainability efforts, which include public image, environmental protection, customer and stakeholder satisfaction, employee morale, and the completion of work that serves a social responsibility or (...)
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  38.  21
    Determinants of Corporate Disclosure and Transparency.Stephen Yan-Leung Cheung, J. Thomas Connelly & Piman Limpaphayom - 2007 - International Corporate Responsibility Series 3:313-342.
    This study examines the degrees of corporate disclosure and transparency of publicly listed companies in two emerging markets and analyzes corporatedisclosure practices as a function of specific firm characteristics. The analysis uses the disclosure and transparency scores extracted from a survey instrument designed to rate disclosure practices of publicly listed companies by using the OECD Corporate Governance Principles as an implicit benchmark. Empirical results show that financial characteristics explain some of the variation in the degrees of (...) disclosure for firms in Hong Kong but not for firms in Thailand. Further, corporate governance characteristics, such as board size and board composition, show more significant associations with the degrees of corporate disclosure inThailand than in Hong Kong. The results are broadly consistent with the notion that good corporate governance leads to better corporate disclosure and transparency in less developed markets. (shrink)
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  39.  4
    Determinants of Corporate Disclosure and Transparency: Evidence From Hong Kong and Thailand.Stephen Yan-Leung Cheung, J. Thomas Connelly & Piman Limpaphayom - 2007 - International Corporate Responsibility Series 3:313-342.
    This study examines the degrees of corporate disclosure and transparency of publicly listed companies in two emerging markets and analyzes corporatedisclosure practices as a function of specific firm characteristics. The analysis uses the disclosure and transparency scores extracted from a survey instrument designed to rate disclosure practices of publicly listed companies by using the OECD Corporate Governance Principles as an implicit benchmark. Empirical results show that financial characteristics explain some of the variation in the degrees of (...) disclosure for firms in Hong Kong but not for firms in Thailand. Further, corporate governance characteristics, such as board size and board composition, show more significant associations with the degrees of corporate disclosure inThailand than in Hong Kong. The results are broadly consistent with the notion that good corporate governance leads to better corporate disclosure and transparency in less developed markets. (shrink)
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  40.  9
    Partner Selection for Corporate Social Responsibility Efforts.Douglas K. Peterson - 2007 - International Corporate Responsibility Series 3:173-187.
    The objective of this paper is to suggest types of analysis that can help managers effectively choose NGO partners that help them meet their international corporate sustainability and social responsibility goals. NGO partner choices should offer a good fit to corporate goals/objectives and create opportunities to reap the benefits of social responsibility and sustainability efforts, which include public image, environmental protection, customer and stakeholder satisfaction, employee morale, and (most importantly) the completion of work that serves a social (...)
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  41. Multiple Objective Robot Coalition Formation.Naveen Kumar, Lovekesh Vig & Manoj Agarwal - 2011 - Journal of Intelligent Systems 20 (4):395-413.
    In multiple robot systems, the problem of allocation of complex tasks to heterogeneous teams of robots, also known as the multiple robot coalition formation problem, has begun to receive considerable attention. Efforts to address the problem range from heuristics based approaches that search the subspaces of the coalition structure to evolutionary learning approaches. Conventional approaches typically strive to optimize a single objective function such as the number of tasks executed or the time required to execute all tasks, or (...)
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  42.  19
    Aesthetics as a Foundation for Business Activity.John Dobson - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 72 (1):41-46.
    This paper identifies the ultimate justification for business activity as an aesthetic justification. Aesthetics, loosely defined as the appreciation of beauty, subsumes both ethics and economics within an holistic justificatory mechanism for business decisions. Five essential qualities of aesthetic judgment are identified: disinterest, subjectivity, inclusivity, contemplativity, and internality. The quality of aesthetic judgment, exercised by the individual through the organization, will determine the extent to which business activity enhances quality of life.
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  43.  36
    How Objective Are Biological Functions?Marcel Weber - 2017 - Synthese 194 (12):4741-4755.
    John Searle has argued that functions owe their existence to the value that we put into life and survival. In this paper, I will provide a critique of Searle’s argument concerning the ontology of functions. I rely on a standard analysis of functional predicates as relating not only a biological entity, an activity that constitutes the function of this entity and a type of system but also a goal state. A functional attribution without specification of such a goal state (...)
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  44.  72
    The Relation Between Policies Concerning Corporate Social Responsibility (Csr) and Philosophical Moral Theories – an Empirical Investigation.Claus Strue Frederiksen - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 93 (3):357 - 371.
    This article examines the relation between policies concerning Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and philosophical moral theories. The objective is to determine which moral theories form the basis for CSR policies. Are they based on ethical egoism, libertarianism, utilitarianism or some kind of common-sense morality? In order to address this issue, I conducted an empirical investigation examining the relation between moral theories and CSR policies, in companies engaged in CSR. Based on the empirical data I collected, I start by (...)
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  45.  12
    Exploring Human Resource Management Roles in Corporate Social Responsibility: The CSR‐HRM Co‐Creation Model.Dima R. Jamali, Ali M. El Dirani & Ian A. Harwood - 2015 - Business Ethics: A European Review 24 (2):125-143.
    Formulating and translating corporate social responsibility strategy into actual managerial practices and outcome values remain ongoing challenges for many organizations. This paper argues that the human resource management function can potentially play an important role in supporting organizations to address this challenge. We argue that HRM could provide an interesting and dynamic support to CSR strategy design as well as implementation and delivery. Drawing on a systematic review of relevant strategic CSR and HRM literatures, this paper highlights the (...)
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  46.  6
    Corporate Image: Employee Reactions and Implications for Managing Corporate Social Performance. [REVIEW]Christine M. Riordan, Robert D. Gatewood & Jodi Barnes Bill - 1997 - Journal of Business Ethics 16 (4):401 - 412.
    Corporate image is a function of organizational signals which determine the perceptions of various stakeholders regarding the actions of an organization. Because of its relationship to the actions of an organization, image has been studied as an indicator of the social performance of the organization. Recent research has determined that social performance has direct effects on the behaviors and attitudes of the organization's employees. To better understand these effects, this study develops and empirically tests a model which links (...)
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  47.  3
    Gain-of-Function Research: Ethical Analysis.Michael J. Selgelid - 2016 - Science and Engineering Ethics 22 (4):923-964.
    Gain-of-function research involves experimentation that aims or is expected to increase the transmissibility and/or virulence of pathogens. Such research, when conducted by responsible scientists, usually aims to improve understanding of disease causing agents, their interaction with human hosts, and/or their potential to cause pandemics. The ultimate objective of such research is to better inform public health and preparedness efforts and/or development of medical countermeasures. Despite these important potential benefits, GOF research can pose risks regarding biosecurity and biosafety. In (...)
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  48. Objective and Subjective 'Ought'.Ralph Wedgwood - 2016 - In Nate Charlow & Matthew Chrisman (eds.), Deontic Modality. Oxford University Press. pp. 143-168.
    This essay offers an account of the truth conditions of sentences involving deontic modals like ‘ought’, designed to capture the difference between objective and subjective kinds of ‘ought’ This account resembles the classical semantics for deontic logic: according to this account, these truths conditions involve a function from the world of evaluation to a domain of worlds (equivalent to a so-called “modal base”), and an ordering of the worlds in such domains; this ordering of the worlds itself arises (...)
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    Objective Bayesianism with Predicate Languages.Jon Williamson - 2008 - Synthese 163 (3):341-356.
    Objective Bayesian probability is often defined over rather simple domains, e.g., finite event spaces or propositional languages. This paper investigates the extension of objective Bayesianism to first-order logical languages. It is argued that the objective Bayesian should choose a probability function, from all those that satisfy constraints imposed by background knowledge, that is closest to a particular frequency-induced probability function which generalises the λ = 0 function of Carnap’s continuum of inductive methods.
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    A Cross-Cultural Construct of the Ethos of the Corporate Codes of Ethics: Australia, Canada and Sweden.Göran Svensson, Greg Wood, Jang Singh & Michael Callaghan - 2009 - Business Ethics 18 (3):253-267.
    The objective of this paper is to develop and describe a construct of the ethos of the corporate codes of ethics (i.e. an ECCE construct) across three countries, namely Australia, Canada and Sweden. The introduced construct is rather unique as it is based on a cross-cultural sample seldom seen in the literature. While the outcome of statistical analyses indicated a satisfactory factor solution and acceptable estimates of reliability measures, some research limitations have been stressed. They provide a foundation (...)
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