Results for 'Corrigibility'

40 found
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  1.  21
    Perception and Corrigibility.Bruce N. Langtry - 1970 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 48 (3):369-372.
  2. Corrigibility and Inference.Norman A. Marshall - 1980 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 41 (1/2):158-166.
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  3.  12
    Corrigibility and Trust in the Practices of Science.Michael Spezio - 2018 - Philosophy, Theology and the Sciences 5 (2):265.
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  4.  22
    Corrigibility, Allegory, Universality: A History of the Gita's Transnational Reception, 1785–1985 - Corrigendum.Mishka Sinha - 2011 - Modern Intellectual History 8 (2):497-497.
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  5.  14
    Truth and Corrigibility.H. T. C. & Henry H. Price - 1936 - Journal of Philosophy 33 (19):526.
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  6.  25
    Corrigibility and Law.Jack Kaminsky - 1954 - Philosophy of Science 21 (1):9-15.
  7.  27
    Rigidity and Corrigibility.Avron Polakow - 1986 - Philosophia 15 (4):397-407.
    Zemach's arguments have gone to show that terms might be rigid designators in ordinary language even though they are not natural kind terms. It has been argued that his argument is inconclusive. However it has been claimed that Putnam's argument is much too strong for it would preclude interesting scientific hypotheses about identity between what appear to be different substances, solely on the grounds of modal necessity.It has been shown that rigid designators can be disjunctive but that this possibility is (...)
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  8.  11
    Truth and Corrigibility[REVIEW]T. C. H. - 1936 - Journal of Philosophy 33 (19):526-527.
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  9.  18
    The Corrigibility and the Generality of Language.Edo Pivčević - 1972 - Mind 81 (321):75-83.
  10.  4
    Corrigibility, Allegory, Universality: A History of the Gita's Transnational Reception, 1785–1945.J. Sharpe - 2010 - Modern Intellectual History 7 (2):297-317.
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  11. The Corrigibility and the Generality of Language. E. Pivcevic - 1972 - Mind 81:75.
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  12. Truth and Corrigibility.H. Price - 1938 - Philosophical Review 47:330.
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  13.  5
    Truth and Corrigibility.Henry Habberley Price - 1936 - Clarendon Press.
  14. Truth and Corrigibility an Inaugural Lecture Delivered Before the Universiy of Oxford on 5 March 1936.H. H. Price - 1936 - Clarendon Press.
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  15. PRICE, H. H. -Truth and Corrigibility[REVIEW]F. C. S. Schiller - 1936 - Mind 45:533.
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  16.  27
    Corrigibility, Allegory, Universality: A History of the Gita's Transnational Reception, 1785–1945*: Mishka Sinha.Mishka Sinha - 2010 - Modern Intellectual History 7 (2):297-317.
    This essay lays out a history of the translation, interpretation, transmission and reception of the Bhagavad Gita as a cultural, religious and philosophical text in the West from 1785 to 1945; in doing so it focuses primarily on Britain, although it also refers to other contexts of reception where they are connected to the British context, or to present revealing or helpful comparisons. The object of the essay is to investigate relationships between the Gita's interpretive history and assumptions about the (...)
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  17. Varieties of Priveleged Access.William P. Alston - 1971 - American Philosophical Quarterly 8 (3):223-41.
    This paper distinguishes and interrelates a number of respects in which persons have been thought to be in a specially favorable epistemic position vis-A-Vis their own mental states. The most important distinction is a six-Fold one between infallibility, Omniscience, Indubitability, Incorrigibility, Truth-Sufficiency, And self-Warrant. Each of these varieties can then be sub-Divided as the kind of modality, If any, Involved. It is also argued that discussions of self-Knowledge have been hampered by a failure to recognize these distinctions.
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  18. Self-Knowledge and Self-Identity.Sydney Shoemaker (ed.) - 1963 - Cornell University Press.
  19. Malcolm on After-Images.P. L. Mckee - 1974 - Philosophical Quarterly 24 (April):132-139.
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  20.  99
    Tormey on Access and Incorrigibility.Fred Feldman & Herbert Heidelberger - 1973 - Journal of Philosophy 70 (May):297-298.
  21.  39
    Access, Incorrigibility, and Identity.Alan Tormey - 1973 - Journal of Philosophy 70 (5):115.
  22. Epistemic Disavowals and Self-Deception.Robert N. Audi - 1976 - Personalist 57 (4):378-385.
     
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  23. Sense And Sensibilia; Reconstructed From The Manuscript Notes By G J Warnock.J. L. Austin - 1964 - Oxford University Press.
  24.  72
    Empiricism, Sense Data and Scientific Languages.A. C. Lloyd - 1950 - Mind 59 (January):57-70.
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  25.  63
    Avowals of Immediate Experience.Raymond D. Bradley - 1964 - Mind 73 (April):186-203.
  26.  32
    Some Comments on Mistakes in Statements Concerning Sense-Data.Erik Gotlind - 1952 - Mind 61 (July):297-306.
  27.  32
    Smart's Identity Theory, Translation, and Incorrigibility.Stephen J. Noren - 1972 - Mind 81 (January):116-120.
  28.  15
    ‘Appear’ and Incorrigibility.Edward S. Shirley - 1976 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 14 (2):197-201.
  29. Idealism Operationalized: How Peirce’s Pragmatism Can Help Explicate and Motivate the Possibly Surprising Idea of Reality as Representational.Catherine Legg - 2017 - In Kathleen Hull & Richard Kenneth Atkins (eds.), Peirce on Perception and Reasoning: From Icons to Logic. New York, USA: Routledge. pp. 40-53.
    Neopragmatism has been accused of having ‘an experience problem’. This paper begins by outlining Hume's understanding of perception according to which ideas are copies of impressions thought to constitute a direct confrontation with reality. This understanding is contrasted with Peirce's theory of perception according to which percepts give rise to perceptual judgments which do not copy but index the percept (just as a weather-cock indicates the direction of the wind). Percept and perceptual judgment thereby mutually inform and correct one another, (...)
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  30. Development and Validation of a Multi-Dimensional Measure of Intellectual Humility.Mark Alfano, Kathryn Iurino, Paul Stey, Brian Robinson, Markus Christen, Feng Yu & Daniel Lapsley - 2017 - PLoS ONE 12 (8):e0182950.
    This paper presents five studies on the development and validation of a scale of intellectual humility. This scale captures cognitive, affective, behavioral, and motivational components of the construct that have been identified by various philosophers in their conceptual analyses of intellectual humility. We find that intellectual humility has four core dimensions: Open-mindedness (versus Arrogance), Intellectual Modesty (versus Vanity), Corrigibility (versus Fragility), and Engagement (versus Boredom). These dimensions display adequate self-informant agreement, and adequate convergent, divergent, and discriminant validity. In particular, (...)
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  31.  84
    Hume on the Standard of Virtue.Jacqueline Taylor - 2002 - The Journal of Ethics 6 (1):43-62.
    Among those sympathetic to Hume''smoral philosophy, a general consensus hasemerged that his first work on the topic,A Treatise of Human Nature, is his best. Hislater work, An Enquiry Concerning thePrinciples of Morals, is regarded as scaleddown in both scope and ambition. In contrastto this standard view, I argue that Hume''slater work offers a more sophisticated theoryof moral evaluation. I begin by reviewing theTreatise theory of moral evaluation tohighlight the reasons why commentators find socompelling Hume''s account of the corrections wemake to (...)
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  32.  32
    F. P. Ramsey on Knowledge and Fallibilism.Erik J. Olsson - 2004 - Dialectica 58 (4):549–557.
    The paper deals mainly with two problems in the epistemology of Frank Plumpton Ramsey. One concerns his account of knowledge, the other his fallibilism. I argue that Ramsey failed to make room for the social aspect of knowledge and, furthermore, that he did not separate the fallibility of our view from its corrigibility. My positive proposal is to combine social reliabilism and corrigibilism with a rejection of fallibilism.
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  33.  11
    F. P. Ramsey on Knowledge and Fallibilism.Erik J. Olsson - 2004 - Dialectica 58 (4):549-557.
    The paper deals mainly with two problems in the epistemology of Frank Plumpton Ramsey. One concerns his account of knowledge, the other his fallibilism. I argue that Ramsey failed to make room for the social aspect of knowledge and, furthermore, that he did not separate the fallibility of our view from its corrigibility. My positive proposal is to combine social reliabilism and corrigibilism with a rejection of fallibilism.
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  34.  63
    Shakespeare and Judgment: The Renewal of Law and Literature.Paul Yachnin & Desmond Manderson - 2010 - The European Legacy 15 (2):195-213.
    Legal theorist Desmond Manderson and Shakespearean Paul Yachnin develop parallel arguments that seek to restore a public dimension of responsibility to literary studies and a private dimension of responsibility to law. Their arguments issue from their work as the creators of the Shakespeare Moot Court at McGill University, a course in which graduate English students team up with senior Law students to argue cases in the “Court of Shakespeare,” where the sole Institutes, Codex, and Digest are comprised by the plays (...)
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  35.  15
    The Concept of Incorrigibility.Richard Robinson - 1972 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 1 (4):427-441.
    In the last thirty-five years philosophers have often referred to corrigible and incorrigible statements or judgements. This usage probably began with the Inaugural lecture of the Wykeham Professor of logic at Oxford University on 5 March, 1936, which was called ‘Truth and Corrigibility’ and discussed the theory that ‘all judgements are corrigible'. Price did not say there that he himself invented this usage. On the contrary, he said that “it is maintained by many philosophers that all judgements are corrigible”. (...)
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  36.  21
    Richard Robinson on Incorrigibility.James Ford - 1974 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 4 (1):199 - 200.
    Richard Robinson has argued that “no consistent and useful and desirable meaning” can be given to the philosophical terms “corrigible” and “incorrigible” so long as one espouses a bivalent theory of truth with the law of excluded middle operative. The crux of his argument is that the corrigibility-incorrigibility distinction can be shown to be redundant since, in effect, incorrigibility is materially equivalent to truth and corrigibility materially equivalent to falsehood. Robinson understands the correcting of a proposition to consist (...)
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  37.  20
    Messianic Vs Myopic Realism.Isaac Levi - 1984 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1984:617-636.
    Two views of the role of truth as an aim of inquiry are contrasted: The Peirce-Popper or messianic view of approach to the truth as an ultimate aim of inquiry and the myopic view according to which a concern to avoid error is a proximate aim common to many otherwise diverse inquiries. The messianic conception is held to be responsible for the tendency to conflate fallibilism with corrigibilism and for the consequent problems faced by Peirceans and Popperians alike in squaring (...)
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  38.  10
    Experiment and the Development of the Theory of Weak Interactions: Fermi's Theory.Allan Franklin - 1986 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1986:163 - 179.
    The fallibility and corrigibility of experimental results, and of the confirmation or refutation based on those results, is illustrated in the 1930's history of Fermi's theory of decay. Early results favored the competing theory of Konopinski and Uhlenbeck. It was found that there were experimental difficulties along with an incorrect theoretical comparison. When the experiments were corrected and the proper theoretical calculations made, the evidence favored Fermi and refuted Konopinski and Uhlenbeck. The relevance of known evidence for confirmation and (...)
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  39. Religious Explanation and Scientific Ideology.Jesse Hobbs - 1996 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 40 (3):175-177.
    Can religious premises ever be cited legitimately in explanations of matters of fact? Scientific practice is generally regarded as the source of our explanatory paradigms and the final arbiter of matters of fact, and is so constituted that it could never endorse such explanations. Neither would they be sanctioned by the non-cognitive reconstructions of religious discourse currently fashionable. I argue: Some scientific constraints on explanations, such as consistency, testability, and corrigibility, are generally legitimate in non-scientific contexts. Other cognitive values, (...)
     
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  40.  27
    Referenz Und Fallibilismus Zu Hilary Putnams Pragmatischem Kognitivismus.Axel Mueller - 2001
    This is a two tiered investigation. On the one hand, the author presents a systematic account of the philosophy of Hilary Putnam. Being the first comprehensive account to be published in the German-speaking world, the author traces the development of Putnam's realism and philosophy of language and their connections from the early 1950's to 2000. Contrary to the popular view of the discontinuity of Putnam's philosophy, he demonstrates that Putnam maintains certain semantic, pragmatic and epistemological foundations for the rational confirmability, (...)
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