Results for 'Covert Action'

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  1.  26
    Partly Cloudy: Ethics in War, Espionage, Covert Action, and Interrogation.David L. Perry - 2009 - Scarecrow Press.
    An introduction to ethical reasoning -- Comparative religious perspectives on war -- Just and unjust war in Shakespeare's Henry V -- Anticipating and preventing atrocities in war -- The CIA's original "social contract" -- The KGB: CIA's traditional adversary -- Espionage -- Covert action -- Interrogation -- Concluding reflections.
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  2. "Repugnant Philosophy": Ethics, Espionage, and Covert Action.L. Perry David - 1995 - Journal of Conflict Studies 15 (1).
    The sources and methods of espionage, the goals and tactics of covert action, and the professional conduct of intelligence officers are matters typically hidden from public scrutiny, yet clearly worthy of public debate and philosophical attention. Recent academic studies of intelligence that have had any intentional bearing on ethics or political philosophy have largely focused on procedural questions surrounding the proper degree of oversight of intelligence agencies. But what is often missed in such examinations is substantive ethical analysis (...)
     
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  3. Capitalism, Covert Action and State-Terrorism: Toward a Political Economy of the Dual State.Nafeez Mossadeq Ahmed - 2013 - In Eric Michael Wilson (ed.), The Dual State: Parapolitics, Carl Schmitt and the National Security Complex. Ashgate.
     
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  4. US Military and Covert Action and Global Justice.Sagar Sanyal - 2009 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 23 (2):213-234.
    US military intervention and covert action is a significant contributor to global injustice. Discussion of this contributor to global injustice is relatively common in social justice movements. Yet it has been ignored by the global justice literature in political philosophy. This paper aims to fill this gap by introducing the topic into the global justice debate. While the global justice debate has focused on inter-national and supra-national institutions, I argue that an adequate analysis of US military and (...) action must focus on domestic institutions of the US. I describe many such institutions including industry lobbying, the ubiquity of US military bases abroad, US programs for training foreign militaries, secrecy of the intelligence and military agencies, pliant news media and government propaganda.<br>. (shrink)
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  5.  10
    US Military and Covert Action and Global Justice.Sagar Sanyal - 2009 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 23 (2):213-234.
    US military intervention and covert action are significant contributors to global injustice. Discussion of this contributor to injustice is relatively common in social justice movements. Yet it has been ignored by the global justice literature in political philosophy. This paper aims to fill this gap by introducing the topic into the debate. While the global justice debate has focused on inter-national and supra-national institutions, I argue that an adequate analysis of US military and covert action must (...)
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  6.  40
    Imposing a Standard: Covert Action and American Democracy.Gregory F. Treverton - 1989 - Ethics and International Affairs 3:27–43.
    The author urges presidents to abstain from implementing covert operations, which often result in nothing more than domestic and international controversy. Such decisions are the domain of the legitimate agency designated for such purposes, the CIA.
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  7.  7
    Partly Cloudy: Ethics in War, Espionage, Covert Action, and Interrogation, 2nd Ed.David L. Perry - 2016 - Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield.
    Ethics in war, espionage, covert action, interrogation, targeted killing. Prima facie duties. Professional ethics. Just war theory. CIA. KGB.
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  8.  14
    David L. Perry, Partly Cloudy: Ethics in War, Espionage, Covert Action, and Interrogation. Reviewed By.Robert J. Deltete - 2010 - Philosophy in Review 30 (4):293-295.
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  9.  2
    Partly Cloudy: Ethics in War, Espionage, Covert Action, and Interrogation.Shannon E. French - 2011 - Journal of Military Ethics 10 (1):74-76.
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  10.  9
    Partly Cloudy: Ethics in War, Espionage, Covert Action, and Interrogation; Religion and the Politics of Peace and Conflict.Paul Martens - 2011 - Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics 31 (1):210-212.
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  11.  79
    Covert Intervention as a Moral Problem.Charles R. Beitz - 1989 - Ethics and International Affairs 3:45–60.
    Today's international community may well view covert action and democracy as mutually exclusive policies. This article examines the practice of covert action in American foreign policy in light of events of the mid-1970s and 1980s, focusing on the scandalous misuse of executive authority and lack of accountability associated with covert means. Often manipulative and sometimes anonymous, covert operations raise critical morality concerns in a democratic society. Whether "any form of accountability is likely to be (...)
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  12.  26
    Covert Agency with Proprioceptive Feedback.Anton Lethin - 2005 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (4-5):96-114.
    : Marcel says that the experience of ownership of actions is given in the specifications for action. He is referring not to a bodily movement but that which precedes it. Is the body involved or are all the changes in the brain? This paper examines the evidence for changes in the spinal cord and muscles that occur with motor imagery, simulation and preparation. There are changes in the alpha motoneurons and in the gamma motoneurons to the muscle spindles. These (...)
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  13.  10
    Predicting Individual Action Switching in Covert and Continuous Interactive Tasks Using the Fluid Events Model.Gabriel A. Radvansky, Sidney K. D’Mello, Robert G. Abbott & Robert E. Bixler - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  14. Action-Based Theories of Perception.Robert Briscoe & Rick Grush - 2015 - In The Stanford Encylcopedia of Philosophy. pp. 1-66.
    Action is a means of acquiring perceptual information about the environment. Turning around, for example, alters your spatial relations to surrounding objects and, hence, which of their properties you visually perceive. Moving your hand over an object’s surface enables you to feel its shape, temperature, and texture. Sniffing and walking around a room enables you to track down the source of an unpleasant smell. Active or passive movements of the body can also generate useful sources of perceptual information (Gibson (...)
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  15. What is ‘Mental Action’?Yair Levy - 2019 - Philosophical Psychology 32 (6):971-993.
    There has been a resurgence of interest lately within philosophy of mind and action in the category of mental action. Against this background, the present paper aims to question the very possibility, or at least the theoretical significance, of teasing apart mental and bodily acts. After raising some doubts over the viability of various possible ways of drawing the mental act/bodily act distinction, the paper draws some lessons from debates over embodied cognition, which arguably further undermine the credibility (...)
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  16.  71
    Combating Academic Fraud: Are Students Reticent About Uncovering the Covert[REVIEW]Charles A. Malgwi & Carter C. Rakovski - 2009 - Journal of Academic Ethics 7 (3):207-221.
    This study links Cressey’s established fraud triangle theory to a recently developed academic fraud risk triangle as a platform for identifying the determinants of academic fraud risk factors. The study then evaluates the magnitude and extent to which students are willing to confront the realities of academic fraud and move towards a culture of academic integrity. Most of the studies pertaining to combating academic fraud have primarily been the opinions of the researchers, namely, the faculty. Although students may not be (...)
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  17. Consequentialism and the Standard Story of Action.Paul Hurley - 2018 - The Journal of Ethics 22 (1):25-44.
    I challenge the common picture of the “Standard Story” of Action as a neutral account of action within which debates in normative ethics can take place. I unpack three commitments that are implicit in the Standard Story, and demonstrate that these commitments together entail a teleological conception of reasons, upon which all reasons to act are reasons to bring about states of affairs. Such a conception of reasons, in turn, supports a consequentialist framework for the evaluation of (...), upon which the normative status of actions is properly determined through appeal to rankings of states of affairs as better and worse. This covert support for consequentialism from the theory of action, I argue, has had a distorting effect on debates in normative ethics. I then present challenges to each of these three commitments, a challenge to the first commitment by T.M. Scanlon, a challenge to the second by recent interpreters of Anscombe, and a new challenge to the third commitment that requires only minimal and prima facie plausible modifications to the Standard Story. The success of any one of the challenges, I demonstrate, is sufficient to block support from the theory of action for the teleological conception of reasons and the consequentialist evaluative framework. I close by demonstrating the pivotal role that such arguments grounded in the theory of action play in the current debate between evaluator-relative consequentialists and their critics. (shrink)
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  18. Voluntary Action and Neural Causation.Hanoch Ben-Yami - 2014 - Cognitive Neuroscience 5 (3-4):217-218.
    I agree with Nachev and Hacker’s general approach. However, their criticism of claims of covert automaticity can be strengthened. I first say a few words on what voluntary action involves and on the consequent limited relevance of brain research for the determination of voluntariness. I then turn to Nachev and Hacker’s discussion of possible covert automaticity and show why the case for it is weaker than they allow.
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  19.  86
    A Common Framework for Perception and Action: Neuroimaging Evidence.Thierry Chaminade & Jean Decety - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):879-882.
    In recent years, neurophysiological evidence has accumulated in favor of a common coding between perception and execution of action. We review findings from recent neuroimaging experiments in the action domain with three complementary perspectives: perception of action, covert action triggered by perception, and reproduction of perceived action (imitation). All studies point to the parietal cortex as a key region for body movement representation, both observed and performed.
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  20. Motor Imagery and Merleau-Pontyian Accounts of Skilled Action.J. C. Berendzen - 2014 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 1:169-198.
    Maurice Merleau-Ponty is often interpreted as claiming that opportunities for action are directly present in perceptual experience. However, he does not provide much evidence for how or why this would occur, and one can doubt that this is an appropriate interpretation of his phenomenological descriptions. In particular, it could be argued the Merleau-Pontyian descriptions mistakenly attribute pre-perceptual or post-perceptual elements such as allocation of attention or judgment to the perceptual experience itself. This paper argues for the Merleau-Pontyian idea that (...)
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  21.  21
    Public Policy, Secret Action.William E. Colby - 1989 - Ethics and International Affairs 3:61–71.
    Exploitation of the executive exercise of covert operations has presented a dilemma, but Colby maintains that even in peacetime a "democratic society must have and respect some secrets.".
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  22.  95
    An Integrated Theory of Language Production and Comprehension.Martin J. Pickering & Simon Garrod - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (4):329-347.
    Currently, production and comprehension are regarded as quite distinct in accounts of language processing. In rejecting this dichotomy, we instead assert that producing and understanding are interwoven, and that this interweaving is what enables people to predict themselves and each other. We start by noting that production and comprehension are forms of action and action perception. We then consider the evidence for interweaving in action, action perception, and joint action, and explain such evidence in terms (...)
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  23.  24
    Ethics of Spying: A Reader for the Intelligence Professional, Vol. I.Joel H. Rosenthal, J. E. Drexel Godfrey, R. V. Jones, Arthur S. Hulnick, David W. Mattausch, Kent Pekel, Tony Pfaff, John P. Langan, John B. Chomeau, Anne C. Rudolph, Fritz Allhoff, Michael Skerker, Robert M. Gates, Andrew Wilkie, James Ernest Roscoe & Lincoln P. Bloomfield Jr (eds.) - 2006 - Lanham, MD: Scarecrow Press.
    This is the first book to offer the best essays, articles, and speeches on ethics and intelligence that demonstrate the complex moral dilemmas in intelligence collection, analysis, and operations. Some are recently declassified and never before published, and all are written by authors whose backgrounds are as varied as their insights, including Robert M. Gates, former Director of the Central Intelligence Agency; John P. Langan, the Joseph Cardinal Bernardin Professor of Catholic Social Thought at the Kennedy Institute of Ethics, Georgetown (...)
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  24.  9
    "Центр спеціальних заходів" - еліта сил спецпризначення сша: Завдання, структура, бойове застосування.Andrii Slyusarenko - 2018 - Схід 1 (153):84-89.
    The research aims to analyze the tasks and structure as well as identify the specifics of training and learn tactical employment of Special Activities Center units of the US CIA - the elite of the American Special Operations Forces. The interest in the study stems from the necessity to learn approaches to tasks, forms of and techniques for employment of Special Operations Forces of ground troops in different countries of the world. The Center history is traced from the Operations and (...)
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  25. By.Charles Pigden - unknown
    Dr Ward of Knox College obviously considers himself a sophisticated fellow. You can tell by the humorous yet statesmanlike tone of his article 'Psst … wanna hear a conspiracy theory?' (ODT 29/6/06). 'It is important', he thinks 'in dialoguing with conspiracy thinking, not just to refute it … but to ask why is it that people are believing this theory?' This apparently 'would create a much healthier dialogue than the shouting past each other that often seems to take place.' In (...)
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  26. Wilt Thou Conceal This Dark Conspiracy? By.Charles Pigden - manuscript
    Dr Ward of Knox College obviously considers himself a sophisticated fellow. You can tell by the humorous yet statesmanlike tone of his article 'Psst … wanna hear a conspiracy theory?' (ODT 29/6/06). 'It is important', he thinks 'in dialoguing with conspiracy thinking, not just to refute it … but to ask why is it that people are believing this theory?' This apparently 'would create a much healthier dialogue than the shouting past each other that often seems to take place.' In (...)
     
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  27.  28
    How the Mind Uses the Brain: To Move the Body and Image the Universe.Ralph D. Ellis - 2010 - Open Court.
    Introduction: Searching for the covert agent of consciousness -- The devil's pact (or, why the hard problem is now so hard) -- Action at the macro level : an agent-based theory of intentionality -- Action imagery and representation of the external world -- Do we need an emergency metaphysician? : action versus reaction at the micro level -- Herding neurons : the causal structure of self-organizing systems -- The paradoxes of phenomenal consciousness -- The self-organizing imagination (...)
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  28.  12
    Pretending to Cooperate. How Speakers Hide Evasive Actions.Dariusz Galasinski - 1996 - Argumentation 10 (3):375-388.
    The paper is based on the following two assumptions. Firstly, evasive utterances are those which are semantically irrelevant to the question they are an answer to. Secondly, they can be divided into two main categories — overt and covert.The question to be asked as regards covert evasion is: How is it possible that an evasive speaker can nevertheless count on her/his utterance being considered cooperative? The objective of this paper is to analyse the means which are used by (...)
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  29. Agency, Simulation and Self-Identification.Marc Jeannerod & Elisabeth Pacherie - 2004 - Mind and Language 19 (2):113-146.
    This paper is concerned with the problem of selfidentification in the domain of action. We claim that this problem can arise not just for the self as object, but also for the self as subject in the ascription of agency. We discuss and evaluate some proposals concerning the mechanisms involved in selfidentification and in agencyascription, and their possible impairments in pathological cases. We argue in favor of a simulation hypothesis that claims that actions, whether overt or covert, are (...)
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  30.  24
    Reach For What You Like: The Body's Role in Shaping Preferences.Raedy M. Ping, Sonica Dhillon & Sian L. Beilock - 2009 - Emotion Review 1 (2):140-150.
    The position of individuals' bodies (e.g., holding a pencil in the mouth in a way that either facilitates or inhibits smiling musculature) can influence their emotional reactions to the stimuli they encounter, and can even impact their explicit preferences for one item over another. In this article we begin by reviewing the literature demonstrating these effects, explore mechanisms to explain this body-preference link, and introduce new work from our lab that asks whether one's bodily or motor experiences might also shape (...)
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  31.  41
    The Gap Between Inattentional Blindness and Attentional Misdirection.Daniel Memmert - 2010 - Consciousness and Cognition 19 (4):1097-1101.
    Kuhn and colleagues described a novel attentional misdirection approach to investigate overt and covert attention mechanisms in connection with inattentional blindness . This misdirection paradigm is valuable to study the temporal relationship between eye movements and visual awareness. Although, as put forth in this comment, the link between attentional misdirection and inattentional blindness needs to be developed further. There are at least four differences between the two paradigms which concern the conceptual aspects of the unexpected object and the methodological (...)
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  32. If the Motor System is No Mirror'.Maria Brincker - 2012 - In Payette (ed.), Connected Minds: Cognition and Interaction in the Social World. Cambridge Scholars Press. pp. 158--182.
    Largely aided by the neurological discovery of so-called “ mirror neurons,” the attention to motor activity during action observation has exploded over the last two decades. The idea that we internally “ mirror ” the actions of others has led to a new strand of implicit simulation theories of action understanding[1][2]. The basic idea of this sort of simulation theory is that we, via an automatic covert activation of our own action representations, can understand the (...) and possibly the goal and/or intentions of the observed agent. In this way motor “simulation” is seen as the basis for low-level “mind-reading”; i.e. for the ascription of goals and intentional mental states to others. The thought is that one, through mirroring simulations, can get beyond the observable behaviour to the hidden minds of others. I am questioning the idea of an exclusively “mirroring” role of the motor system in social perception, which is tacitly assumed in this sort of simulation theories. Is motor activity during action observation really primarily a simulation, a detailed “echo” of the others action? My point is not that we never simulate what we observe, but rather to question whether such processes are representative of the overall motor contribution to social cognition. More and more studies on the functional properties of mirror neurons and motor facilitation during perception points to a more complex role of the motor system in action perception. Recently, several proposals have been made attempting to reinterpret and critique the function of motor activity in social situations. I shall here briefly touch on a few of these and sketch parts of my own alternative “social affordance” hypothesis of the sensorimotor contribution to social perception. By way of these analyses I highlight how traditional discussions are marred by problematic theoretical assumptions. It seems to me that we need a thorough reinterpretation not just of mirror neurons and mirroring, but also of what we take motor and social cognition to be. In my view the details of the sensorimotor findings underline the need to move beyond the simplistic idea of the motor system as a unitary output system. In terms of social cognition I question the traditional focus on hidden mental states. I suggest that the motor contribution might have more to do with understanding the process of how others choose their actions, navigate the world and relate to others than with simulating specific actual actions or mental states. I conclude that low-level simulation theories, which see the motor role in social perception as passive “mirroring,” are faced with serious empirical challenges, and that the motor system serve a much more proactive and complex cognitive role in social perception and interaction than previously thought. But my claim is also that many empirical tensions have slipped out of focus due to entrenched theoretical assumptions. Narrow theoretical expectations have marked not only the interpretations but the research itself and I propose that we are in dire need of more studies of actual contextual and interactive social perception. (shrink)
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  33.  29
    Moral Responsibility and the Problem of Induced Pro-Attitudes.Ishtiyaque Haji - 1996 - Dialogue 35 (4):703-720.
    The problem of induced pro-attitudes is simply this: why is action which ultimately issues from pro-attitudes such as desires, volitions, and goals, induced by techniques such as direct manipulation of the brain, hypnosis, or “value engineering,” frequently regarded as action for which its agent cannot be held morally responsible? The problem is of interest for several reasons. Ferdinand Schoeman, for instance, believes that the problem poses a resolvable but challenging predicament for compatibilists: if agents can be held morally (...)
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  34.  44
    Arendt and the Theological Significance of Natality.Mavis Louise Biss - 2012 - Philosophy Compass 7 (11):762-771.
    In her 1958 book The Human Condition, Hannah Arendt points to the potential of human action to initiate new beginnings, a capacity she calls natality, as the source of political renewal that could save the modern age from ruin. The question of the relationship between natality and theological concepts is one of the most perplexing points of dispute in the Arendt scholarship of the last two decades. The overall function of the concept of natality in Arendt’s thought has been (...)
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  35. Cognitive Dissonance and the Logic of Racism.Dimitria Gatzia & Berit Brogaard - forthcoming - In Berit Brogaard & Dimitria Gatzia (eds.), Being of Two Minds: The Philosophy and Psychology of Ambivalence. Routledge.
    Cognitive dissonance is a kind of ambivalence in which your apprehension of the fact that you performed or want to perform an action of which you disapprove gives rise to psychological distress. This, in turn, causes you to solicit unconscious processes that can help you reduce the distress. Here we look at the role that cognitive dissonance plays in explaining the inner workings of racism. We distinguish between three types of racist acts: inadvertent bigotry, habitual racism, and explicit racism. (...)
     
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  36.  23
    Nominal Aspect.Jan N. M. Rijkhoff - 1991 - Journal of Semantics 8 (4):291-309.
    The article 'Nominal Aspect' in Journal of Semantics (1991) is now outdated. For a more recent account of nominal aspect marking and Seinsart, see, for example: - Rijkhoff, Jan. 2010. On flexible and rigid nouns. In Umberto Ansaldo, Jan Don and Roland Pfau (eds.), Parts of Speech: Empirical and Theoretical Advances (Benjamins Current Topics 25), 227-252. Amsterdam and Philadelphia: Benjamins (= Rijkhoff, Jan. 2008. On flexible and rigid nouns. Studies in Language 32-3, 727-752). - Rijkhoff, Jan. 2002(Hb)/2004(Pb). The Noun Phrase. (...)
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  37.  34
    Moral Worth and Inclinations in Kantian Ethics.Christian Onof - 2011 - Kant Studies Online 2011 (1).
    This paper addresses the issue of making sense of Kant’s notion of moral worth. Kant’s identification in GMM1 I of the good will as the unconditional good leads to understanding the moral worth of human agency in ways which, some critics claim, is at odds with our moral intuitions. By first focusing upon how Kant singles out action out of duty as characteristic of the good will, we shall show that a covert assumption about our nature potentially weakens (...)
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  38.  83
    Neurodisruption of Selective Attention: Insights and Implications.Christopher D. Chambers & Jason B. Mattingley - 2005 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (11):542-550.
    Mechanisms of selective attention are vital for coherent perception and action. Recent advances in cognitive neuroscience have yielded key insights into the relationship between neural mechanisms of attention and eye movements, and the role of frontal and parietal brain regions as sources of attentional control. Here we explore the growing contribution of reversible neurodisruption techniques, including transcranial magnetic stimulation and microelectrode stimulation, to the cognitive neuroscience of spatial attention. These approaches permit unique causal inferences concerning the relationship between neural (...)
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  39.  87
    Antiracism as an Ethical Imperative: An Example From Feminist Therapy.Laura S. Brown - 1991 - Ethics and Behavior 1 (2):113 – 127.
    This article presents a conceptual framework within feminist therapy theory for viewing overt and covert racist behaviors as forms of unethical action. Using the personal as theoretical and political, the author traces her process of having her consciousness raised regarding the issue of racism in psychotherapy. Racism is then conceptualized as an ethics problem in terms of lack of mutuality and respect, violation of boundaries, and unethical imbalance of power in the therapy relationship. The concept of antiracism, a (...)
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  40.  98
    Selective Hard Compatibilism.Paul Russell - 2010 - In J. Campbell, M. O'Rourke & H. Silverstein (eds.), Action, Ethics and Responsibility: Topics in Contemporary Philosophy, Vol. 7. Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press. pp. 149-73.
    .... The strategy I have defended involves drawing a distinction between those who can and cannot legitimately hold an agent responsible in circumstances when the agent is being covertly controlled (e.g. through implantation processes). What is intuitively unacceptable, I maintain, is that an agent should be held responsible or subject to reactive attitudes that come from another agent who is covertly controlling or manipulating him. This places some limits on who is entitled to take up the participant stance in relation (...)
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  41.  48
    Generics, Covert Structure and Logical Form.Rachel Katharine Sterken - 2016 - Mind and Language 31 (5):503-529.
    The standard view amongst philosophers of language and linguists is that the logical form of generics is quantificational and contains a covert, unpronounced quantifier expression Gen. Recently, some theorists have begun to question the standard view and rekindle the competing proposal, that generics are a species of kind-predication. These theorists offer some forceful objections to the standard view, and new strategies for dealing with the abundance of linguistic evidence in favour of the standard view. I respond to these objections (...)
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  42. Mundane Whistleblowing: Social Drama in Assessment Talk.Michael Tholander - 2011 - Discourse Studies 13 (1):69-92.
    Based on recordings of naturalistic interaction, this study explores how a case of mundane whistleblowing unfolds in real time. In the analyzed recordings, a teacher instructs five students to engage in self- and peer-assessment. A few minutes into the session, one of the students indirectly accuses his peers of staging a cover-up. This whistleblowing action is analyzed in detail, but the main analytical focus is on the conversational strategies employed in response to it. These strategies — for example, emotional (...)
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  43.  49
    Bayesianism and Austrian Apriorism.Frank van Dun - unknown
    In the last published round of his debate with Walter Block on economic methodology,1 Bryan Caplan introduces Bayes’ Rule as ‘a cure for methodological schizofrenia’. Block had raised the question ‘Why do economists react so violently to empirical evidence against the conventional view of the minimum wage’s effect?’ and answered it with the suggestion that economists do so because they are covert praxeologists. This means that they base most of their economic arguments on conclusions derived from their a priori (...)
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  44.  1
    Control and Ownership of Neuroprosthetic Speech.Hannah Maslen & Stephen Rainey - forthcoming - Philosophy and Technology:1-21.
    Implantable brain-computer interfaces are being developed to restore speech capacity for those who are unable to speak. Patients with locked-in syndrome or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis could be able to use covert speech – vividly imagining saying something without actual vocalisation – to trigger neural controlled systems capable of synthesising speech. User control has been identified as particularly pressing for this type of BCI. The incorporation of machine learning and statistical language models into the decoding process introduces a contribution to (...)
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  45.  36
    Covert Distributivity in Algebraic Event Semantics.Lucas Champollion - 2016 - Semantics and Pragmatics 9 (15):1-66.
    This is the first in a pair of papers that aim to provide a comprehensive analysis of the semantic phenomenon of distributivity in natural language. This paper investigates and formalizes different sources of covert distributivity. Apart from lexical distributivity effects, which are modeled by meaning postulates, phrasal distributivity is captured via two covert operators: (i) a D operator distributing over atoms only (Link 1987), and (ii) a cover-based Part operator, which can also distribute over non-atomic pluralities under contextual (...)
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  46.  18
    Covert Shifts of Attention Function as an Implicit Aid to Insight.Laura E. Thomas & Alejandro Lleras - 2009 - Cognition 111 (2):168-74.
  47.  58
    Covert Video Surveillance--An Assessment of the Staffordshire Protocol.T. Thomas - 1996 - Journal of Medical Ethics 22 (1):22-25.
    An assessment of a protocol devised to guide practitioners thinking of using covert video surveillance. Such surveillance is particularly used to help identify cases of Munchausen's syndrome by proxy. The protocol in question has been written by staff at the Academic Department of Paediatrics, North Staffordshire Hospital, Stoke-on-Trent in association with their local Area Child Protection Committee and has been commended by the Department of Health to others wishing to implement covert video surveillance.
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  48.  19
    Understanding Covert Recognition.A. Mike Burton, Andrew W. Young, Vicki Bruce, Robert A. Johnston & Andrew W. Ellis - 1991 - Cognition 39 (2):129-166.
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  49.  15
    Covert and Overt Orienting of Attention to Emotional Faces in Anxiety.Brendan P. Bradley, Karin Mogg & Neil H. Millar - 2000 - Cognition and Emotion 14 (6):789-808.
  50.  43
    Is Covert Attention Really Unnecessary?Alexander Pollatsek & Keith Rayner - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (4):695-696.
    We are largely in agreement with the Findlay & Walker model. However, they appear to dismiss the role of covert spatial attention in tasks in which people are free to move their eyes. We argue that an account of the facts about the perceptual span in reading requires a window of attention not centered around the fovea. Moreover, a computational model of reading that we (Reichle et al. 1998) developed gives a good account of eye movement control in reading (...)
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