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Craig Martin [13]Craig Edwin Martin [1]
  1.  39
    Francisco Vallés and the Renaissance Reinterpretation of Aristotle's Meteorologica Iv as a Medical Text1.Craig Martin - 2002 - Early Science and Medicine 7 (1):1-30.
    In this paper I describe the context and goals of Francisco Vallés' In IV librum Meteorologicorum commentaria. Vallés' work stands as a landmark because it interprets a work of Aristotle's natural philosophy specifically for medical doctors and medical theory. Vallés' commentary is representative of new understandings of Galenic-Hippocratic medi-cine that emerged as a result of expanding textual knowledge. These approaches are evident in a number of sixteenth-century commentaries on Meteorologica IV; in particular the works of Pietro Pomponazzi, Lodovico Boccadiferro, Jacob (...)
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  2.  26
    With Aristotelians Like These, Who Needs Anti-Aristotelians? Chymical Corpuscular Matter Theory in Niccolò Cabeo's Meteorology.Craig Martin - 2006 - Early Science and Medicine 11 (2):135-161.
    Niccolò Cabeo, a Jesuit based in Northern Italy, wrote a massive commentary on Aristotle's Meteorology that was first printed in 1646. The central concepts of this work emerged from the chymical philosophy of his time. Cabeo advocated a corpuscular matter theory that integrated Paracelsian principles and Aristotelian elements. Furthermore, he rejected the application of metaphysics and mathematics to natural philosophy. Instead he promoted experiential and experimental practices, including chymical ones, to investigate what he called the "real physical" world. Cabeo's epistemology (...)
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  3.  18
    Rethinking Renaissance Averroism.Craig Martin - 2007 - Intellectual History Review 17 (1):3-28.
  4.  19
    The Aeolipile as Experimental Model in Early Modern Natural Philosophy.Craig Martin - 2016 - Perspectives on Science 24 (3):264-284.
    What causes winds was regarded as one of the most difficult questions of early modern natural philosophy. Vitruvius, the ancient Roman architectural author, put forth an alternative to Aristotle’s theory by likening the generation of wind to the actions of the aeolipile, which he believed made artificial winds. As Vitruvius’s work proliferated during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, numerous natural philosophers, including Descartes, used the aeolipile as a model for nature. Yet, interpretations of Vitruvius’s text and of the relation of (...)
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  5.  26
    Pietro Pomponazzi: Tradizione e dissenso.Craig Martin - 2011 - Early Science and Medicine 16 (4):358-360.
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  6.  14
    Liba Taub. Ancient Meteorology. Xiv + 271 Pp., Illus., Bibl., Index. London/New York: Routledge/Taylor & Francis Group, 2003. $28.95. [REVIEW]Craig Martin - 2004 - Isis 95 (4):690-691.
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  7.  14
    The Invention of Atmosphere.Craig Martin - 2015 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 52:44-54.
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  8.  21
    The Ends of Weather: Teleology in Renaissance Meteorology.Craig Martin - 2010 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 48 (3):259-282.
    The Divide between the prominence of final causes in Aristotelian natural philosophy and the rejection or severe limitation of final causation as an acceptable explanation of the natural world by figures such as Bacon, Descartes, and Spinoza during the seventeenth century has been considered a distinguishing mark between pre-modern and modern science.1 Admittedly, proponents of the mechanical and corpuscular philosophies of the seventeenth century were not necessarily stark opponents of teleology. Pierre Gassendi and Robert Boyle endorsed teleology, Leibniz embraced entelechies, (...)
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  9.  11
    Conjecture, Probabilism, and Provisional Knowledge in Renaissance Meteorology.Craig Martin - 2009 - Early Science and Medicine 14 (1-3):265-289.
    For Renaissance Aristotelian natural philosophers, ideally knowledge was certain and based on syllogistic demonstration. Many Italian scholars, such as Agostino Nifo, Pietro Pomponazzi, and Niccolò Cabeo, considered this ideal as inapplicable to the field of meteorology. Rather, because of the accidental nature of meteorological phenomena and the inherent irregularity of the weather, they believed that causal explanations of meteorology were largely conjectural, provisional, and probabilistic. Several of these natural philosophers applied the standard of "saving the appearances" to the field of (...)
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  10.  7
    Book Review: Structure and Method in Aristotle’s Meteorologica: A More Disorderly Nature, Written by Malcolm Wilson. [REVIEW]Craig Martin - 2015 - Early Science and Medicine 20 (1):77-79.
  11.  2
    Ancient Meteorology. [REVIEW]Craig Martin - 2004 - Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 95:690-691.
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  12.  3
    Binding the Dogs of War: Japan and the Constitutionalizing Of.Craig Martin - unknown
    There is still very little constitutional control over the decision to use armed force, and very limited domestic implementation of the international principles of jus ad bellum, notwithstanding the increasing overlap between international and domestic legal systems and the spread of constitutional democracy. The relationship between constitutional and international law constraints on the use of armed force has a long history. Aspects of constitutional theory, liberal theories of international law, and transnational process theory of international law compliance, suggest that constitutional (...)
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  13. Meteorology for Courtiers and Ladies: Vernacular Aristotelianism in Renaissance Italy.Craig Martin - 2012 - Philosophical Readings 4 (2):3-14.
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