Results for 'Craig Stephen Delancey'

998 found
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  1. Meaning naturalism, meaning irrealism, and the work of language.Craig Stephen Delancey - 2007 - Synthese 154 (2):231-257.
    I defend the hypothesis that organisms that produce and recognize meaningful utterances tend to use simpler procedures, and should use the simplest procedures, to produce and recognize those utterances. This should be a basic principle of any naturalist theory of meaning, which must begin with the recognition that the production and understanding of meanings is work. One measure of such work is the minimal amount of space resources that must go into storing a procedure to produce or recognize a meaningful (...)
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  2. Emotion, Action, and Intentionality.Craig Stephen Delancey - 1999 - Dissertation, Indiana University
    The thesis defends the view that there are basic emotions---pancultural emotions that can be, but are not necessarily, propositional attitudes---and endorses a version of the affect program theory of emotions, augmented with a special stress upon the relation of emotions to motor capabilities and strategies. After developing a taxonomy of affects, I argue against the reduction of emotions to other mental states like belief, desire, or judgment. I then discuss how affects relate to belief. First, I consider the claims of (...)
     
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  3.  25
    A Guide to Good Reasoning: Cultivating Intellectual Virtues, 2nd ed.. by David Carl Wilson; Introduction to Philosophy: Logic, edited by Benjamin Martin; A Concise Introduction to Logic, by Craig DeLancey.Stephen M. Nelson - 2022 - Teaching Philosophy 45 (2):251-258.
  4. Exploring the challenges and successes of the Lecturer Practitioner role using a stakeholder evaluation approach.Helen Hancock, Hilary Lloyd, Steve Campbell, Chris Turnock & Stephen Craig - 2007 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 13 (5):758-764.
  5. Passionate Engines: What Emotions Reveal About the Mind and Artificial Intelligence.Craig DeLancey - 2001 - New York, US: Oxford University Press USA.
    DeLancey shows that our understanding of emotion provides essential insight on key issues in philosophy of mind and artificial intelligence. He offers us a bold new approach to the study of the mind based on the latest scientific research and provides an accessible overview of the science of emotion.
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  6.  94
    Ontology and Teleofunctions: A Defense and Revision of the Systematic Account of Teleological Explanation.Craig S. Delancey - 2006 - Synthese 150 (1):69-98.
    I defend and revise the systematic account of normative functions (teleofunctions), as recently developed by Gerhard Schlosser and by W. D. Christensen and M. H. Bickhard. This account proposes that teleofunctions are had by structures that play certain kinds of roles in complex systems. This theory is an alternative to the historical etiological account of teleofunctions, developed by Ruth Millikan and others. The historical etiological account is susceptible to a general ontological problem that has been under-appreciated, and that offers important (...)
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  7. Basic moods.Craig DeLancey - 2006 - Philosophical Psychology 19 (4):527-538.
    The hypothesis that some moods are emotions has been rejected in philosophy, and is an unpopular alternative in psychology. This is because there is wide agreement that moods have a number of features distinguishing them from emotions. These include: lack of an intentional object and the related notion of lack of a goal; being of long duration; having pervasive or widespread effects; and having causes rather than reasons. Leading theories of mood have tried to explain these purported features by describing (...)
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  8. Camus’s Absurd and the Argument against Suicide.Craig DeLancey - 2021 - Philosophia 49 (5):1953-1971.
    There are striking differences between Camus’s early and late philosophical essays, but Camus often claimed that his works were part of one consistent project. This paper argues that, although Camus had a significant change in his views on the consequences of the absurd, throughout his life he also had a common concern with the relation of the absurd to morality. Showing this requires us to clarify what Camus meant by the “absurd,” and identify at least three different uses of the (...)
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  9.  87
    An Examination of the Relationship Between Ethical Work Climate and Moral Awareness.Craig V. VanSandt, Jon M. Shepard & Stephen M. Zappe - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 68 (4):409-432.
    This paper draws from the fields of history, sociology, psychology, moral philosophy, and organizational theory to establish a theoretical connection between a social/organizational influence (ethical work climate) and an individual cognitive element of moral behavior (moral awareness). The research was designed to help to fill a gap in the existing literature by providing empirical evidence of the connection between organizational influences and individual moral awareness and subsequent ethical choices, which has heretofore largely been merely assumed. Results of the study provide (...)
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  10. Does a Parsimony Principle Entail a Simple World?Craig DeLancey - 2011 - Metaphysica 12 (2):87-100.
    Many scholars claim that a parsimony principle has ontological implications. The most common such claim is that a parsimony principle entails that the “world” is simple. This ontological claim appears to often be coupled with the assumption that a parsimony principle would be corroborated if the “world” were simple. I clarify these claims, describe some minimal features of simplicity, and then show that both these claims are either false or they depend upon an implausible notion of simplicity. In their stead, (...)
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  11.  15
    Teleofunctions and Oncomice.Craig Delancey - 2004 - Environmental Ethics 26 (2):171-188.
    The view that organisms deserve moral respect because they have their own purposes is often grounded in a specification of the biological functions that the organism has. One way to identify such functions, adopted by Gary Varner, is to determine the etiology of some behavior based on the evolution of the structures enabling it. This view suffers from some unacceptable problems, including that some organisms with profound defects will by definition have a welfare interest in their defects. For example, this (...)
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  12.  29
    Teleofunctions and Oncomice.Craig Delancey - 2004 - Environmental Ethics 26 (2):171-188.
    The view that organisms deserve moral respect because they have their own purposes is often grounded in a specification of the biological functions that the organism has. One way to identify such functions, adopted by Gary Varner, is to determine the etiology of some behavior based on the evolution of the structures enabling it. This view suffers from some unacceptable problems, including that some organisms with profound defects will by definition have a welfare interest in their defects. For example, this (...)
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  13.  49
    Architecture can save the world: Building and environmental ethics.Craig Delancey - 2004 - Philosophical Forum 35 (2):147–159.
  14.  17
    Explaining the entangled networks of the brain.Craig DeLancey - forthcoming - Metascience:1-3.
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  15.  59
    An Ecological Concept of Wilderness.Craig DeLancey - 2012 - Ethics and the Environment 17 (1):25-44.
    Many share the conviction that wilderness should play a special role in any environmental ethic, even though the concept of wilderness remains contentious. Ever since it has been recognized that the traditional concept of a wilderness as a region “untrammeled” by human beings has a number of intractable difficulties, there has been no consensus on how we should understand wilderness, and most definitions or descriptions of wilderness remain negative (defining wilderness in terms of what it is not). I propose a (...)
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  16.  89
    After Finitude: An Essay on the Necessity of Contingency. By Quentin Meillassoux.Craig Delancey - 2012 - The European Legacy 17 (3):403 - 404.
    The European Legacy, Volume 17, Issue 3, Page 403-404, June 2012.
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  17.  42
    Affect programs, intentionality, and consciousness.Craig DeLancey - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (2):197-198.
    I express two concerns with the theory of emotion that Rolls provides: (1) rewards and punishers alone fail to explain the basic emotions; (2) Rolls needs to clarify his notion of the intentionality of emotions. I also criticize his theory of consciousness, arguing that it fails to explain qualia, and that ironically it is emotions which make this most evident.
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  18.  8
    Action, the Scientific Worldview, and Being‐in‐the‐World.Craig Delancey - 2006 - In Hubert L. Dreyfus & Mark A. Wrathall (eds.), A Companion to Phenomenology and Existentialism. Oxford, UK: Blackwell. pp. 356–376.
    This chapter contains sections titled: Scientific Naturalism and the Problems of Purposeful Activity Action and Heidegger's Critique of the Subject/Object Distinction Merleau‐Ponty and a Concrete Being‐in‐the‐World An Opportunity.
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  19.  31
    Commitment and attunement.Craig DeLancey - 2014 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 13 (4):579-594.
    Heidegger’s view of attunement, and evolutionary theories of emotion, would appear to be wholly independent accounts of affects. This paper argues that we can understand the phenomenology of attunement and the evolutionary functionalist theory of emotions as distinct perspectives on those same emotions. The reason that the two perspectives are distinct is that some affects can act as commitment mechanisms, and this requires them to be experienced in a way that obscures their ultimate functional role. These perspectives are potentially mutually (...)
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  20.  44
    Consciousness and the superfunctionality claim.Craig DeLancey - 2012 - Philosophical Studies 161 (3):433-451.
    The superfunctionality claim is that phenomenal experiences are more than functional (objective, causal) relations. This is one of the most widely used but least attacked claims in the anti-physicalist literature on consciousness. Coupled with one form of structuralism, the view that science only explains functional relations, the superfunctionality claim entails that science will not explain phenomenal experience. The claim is therefore essential to many anti-physicalist arguments. I identify an open question argument for the superfunctionality claim that expresses an intuition deserving (...)
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  21.  59
    Emotion and the function of consciousness.Craig DeLancey - 1996 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 3 (5-6):492-99.
    Certain arguments that phenomenal conscious states play no role, or play a role that could be different, depend upon the seeming plausibility of thought experiments such as the inverted spectrum or phenomenal zombie. These thought experiments are always run for perceptual states like colour vision. Run for affective states like emotions, they become absurd, because the prior intension of our concepts of emotional states are that the phenomenal experience is inseparable from their motivational aspects. Our growing scientific understanding of emotion (...)
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  22.  35
    Emotion and the computational theory of mind.Craig DeLancey - 1997 - In S. O'Nuillain, Paul McKevitt & E. MacAogain (eds.), Two Sciences of Mind. John Benjamins.
    The case for computationalism about the mind is in doubt when we acknowledge that there are mental phenomena that require, for a proper accounting, that we get below the level of symbol processing. Such phenomena show us that a computational theory of mind cannot be complete. Chief among these phenomena is emotion.
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  23.  38
    Lewis's DS approach is a tool, not a theory.Craig DeLancey - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (2):201-201.
    Lewis argues convincingly that a DS approach to emotion theory will be fruitful. He also appears to hold that there are DS principles that constitute a theory or are substantial empirical claims. I argue that this latter move is a mistake.
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  24. Phenomenal experience and the measure of information.Craig DeLancey - 2007 - Erkenntnis 66 (3):329-352.
    This paper defends the hypothesis that phenomenal experiences may be very complex information states. This can explain some of our most perplexing anti-physicalist intuitions about phenomenal experience. The approach is to describe some basic facts about information in such a way as to make clear the essential oversight involved, by way illustrating how various intuitive arguments against physicalism (such as Frank Jackson.
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  25.  50
    Real emotions.Craig DeLancey - 1998 - Philosophical Psychology 11 (4):467-487.
    I argue that natural realism is the best approach to explaining some emotional actions, and thus is the best candidate to explain the relevant emotions. I take natural realism to be the view that these emotions are motivational states which must be identified by using (not necessarily exclusively) naturalistic discourse which, if not wholly lacking intentional terms, at least does not require reference to belief and desire. The kinds of emotional actions I consider are ones which continue beyond the satisfaction (...)
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  26.  34
    Supersizing the Mind: Embodiment, Action, and Cognitive Extension (review).Craig DeLancey - 2010 - Symploke 18 (1-2):415-417.
  27.  92
    The modal arguments and the complexity of consciousness.Craig DeLancey - 2012 - Ratio 26 (1):35-50.
    This paper explores consequences of the claim that phenomenal experiences are physical events of great descriptive complexity. This claim is attractive both because it can explain our most perplexing intuitions about the quality of consciousness and also because it is suggestive of very productive research opportunities. I illustrate the former by showing that two of the most compelling anti-physicalist arguments about phenomenal experience – the modal argument of Kripke and the conceivability argument of Chalmers – are not sound if this (...)
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  28. The Intractable Rivalry.Stephen Craig Dilley - 2006 - Ars Disputandi 6:1566-5399.
     
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  29.  9
    "Behind" the Text: History and Biblical Interpretation.Craig G. Bartholomew, C. Stephen Evans & Mary Healy - 2003 - Harper Collins.
    The fourth in a series of books that result from annual conferences of the top evangelical hermeneutical scholars in the world. The topic for this book probes contemporary theories on the philosophy and theology of history and analyzes how those views intersect with the concept of the Bible as history.
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  30.  5
    Darwinian Natural Right: The Biological Ethics of Human Nature.Stephen Craig Dilley - 2002 - Philosophia Christi 4 (1):239-243.
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  31.  37
    Review of Georg Brun, ulvi doguoglu, Dominique kuenzle (eds.), Epistemology and Emotions[REVIEW]Craig DeLancey - 2009 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (3).
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  32.  95
    Review of Jesse J. Prinz, Gut Reactions: A Perceptual Theory of Emotion[REVIEW]Craig DeLancey - 2005 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2005 (10).
  33.  26
    Review of Ronald de sousa, Why Think? Evolution and the Rational Mind[REVIEW]Craig DeLancey - 2007 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (12).
  34.  14
    Preternatural Pollutions': Nature, Culture, and Same-Sex Desire in Edward Ward's 'Of the Mollies Club.Lauren Craig Stephen - 2005 - Lumen: Selected Proceedings From the Canadian Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies 24:105.
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  35.  16
    The Protestant ethic effect in a multichoice environment.Ronald M. Stephens, Leroy P. Metze & James R. Craig - 1975 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 6 (2):137-139.
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  36.  36
    Is Goodness Without God Good Enough?: A Debate on Faith, Secularism, and Ethics.Louise Antony, William Lane Craig, John Hare, Donald C. Hubin, Paul Kurtz, C. Stephen Layman, Mark C. Murphy, Walter Sinnott-Armstrong & Richard Swinburne - 2008 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Is Goodness Without God Good Enough contains a lively debate between William Lane Craig and Paul Kurtz on the relationship between God and ethics, followed by seven new essays that both comment on the debate and advance the broader discussion of this important issue. Written in an accessible style by eminent scholars, this book will appeal to students and academics alike.
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  37.  6
    Hume and the Enlightenment.Craig Taylor & Stephen Buckle (eds.) - 2011 - Pickering & Chatto Publishing.
    While Hume remains one of the most central figures in modern philosophy his place within Enlightenment thinking is much less clearly defined. Taking recent work on Hume as a starting point, this volume of original essays aims to re-examine and clarify Hume's influence on the thought and values of the Enlightenment.
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  38. Polarization and Belief Dynamics in the Black and White Communities: An Agent-Based Network Model from the Data.Patrick Grim, Stephen B. Thomas, Stephen Fisher, Christopher Reade, Daniel J. Singer, Mary A. Garza, Craig S. Fryer & Jamie Chatman - 2012 - In Christoph Adami, David M. Bryson, Charles Offria & Robert T. Pennock (eds.), Artificial Life 13. MIT Press.
    Public health care interventions—regarding vaccination, obesity, and HIV, for example—standardly take the form of information dissemination across a community. But information networks can vary importantly between different ethnic communities, as can levels of trust in information from different sources. We use data from the Greater Pittsburgh Random Household Health Survey to construct models of information networks for White and Black communities--models which reflect the degree of information contact between individuals, with degrees of trust in information from various sources correlated with (...)
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  39.  30
    Helping Clinicians Find Resolution after a Medical Error.Craig Pollack, Carol Bayley, Michael Mendiola & Stephen Mcphee - 2003 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 12 (2):203-207.
    Clinicians, operating within complex systems, make mistakes, as people do in every human endeavor, and when they do, patients are sometimes harmed. One important question is how we as clinicians can find resolution in the wake of an error. The published literature has divided errors into those caused by “systems” and by “individuals.” But whereas both “systems” and “individual” approaches are important in understanding the cause of an error, neither alone can fully lead to resolution once an error has occurred. (...)
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  40.  9
    Sam Harris.Sandra Woien & Stephen Ronald Craig Hicks (eds.) - 2023 - Chicago: Open Universe.
    Sam Harris, a previously unknown neuroscientist, single-handedly generated the New Atheism with his best-selling book The End of Faith, which quickly became a huge best-seller following its release in 2004. Harris went on to write several more best-sellers on a range of topics and has become one of the world's most followed podcasters. He is well-known for his controversial positions in many areas, including the unique danger of Islam, the advocacy of atheist spirituality through meditation, the beneficial use of psychedelics, (...)
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  41. Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy: Genealogy to Iqbal.Edward Craig - 1996 - New York: Routledge.
    The_ Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy_ is the most ambitious international philosophy project in many years. Edited by Edward Craig and assisted by thirty specialist subject editors, the REP consists of ten volumes of the world's most eminent philosophers writing for the needs of students and teachers of philosophy internationally. The REP is a project on an unparalleled scale: Over 2000 entries ranging from 500 to 15,000 words in length - thematic, biographical and national 10 volumes consisting of over 5 (...)
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  42.  29
    How Health Humanities Will Save the Life of the Humanities.Craig M. Klugman - 2017 - Journal of Medical Humanities 38 (4):419-430.
    In the last decade, the humanities have been shrinking in number of students, percent of faculty, and in number of degrees awarded. Humanities students also earn lower salaries than their STEM-prepared peers. At the same time, the health humanities have been in ascendance over the last fifteen years. The number of majors, minors and certificates has increased 266% in that time frame, attracting large numbers of students and preparing future patients, lay caregivers, and health care providers to interact with a (...)
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  43.  43
    Book Review Section 2. [REVIEW]Gerald M. Reagan, John L. Harrison, Don Cochrane, Don-Chean Chu, J. Stephen Hazlett, Basil J. Reppas, Robert P. Craig, John L. Elias, Albert E. Bender, Joseph Fashing, Donald K. Sharpes & Russell Dennis - 1974 - Educational Studies 5 (4):247-258.
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  44.  11
    Book Review Section 3. [REVIEW]Hugh D. Hudson Jr, Stephen Duguid, Craig Kridel, George J. Tanabe Jr, Olga Skorapa, Edward H. Berman & Susanne M. Shafer - 1988 - Educational Studies 19 (3-4):403-432.
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  45. Stephen Savitt, ed., Time's Arrow Today: Recent Physical and Philosophical Work on the Direction of Time Reviewed by.Craig Callender - 1996 - Philosophy in Review 16 (1):57-59.
     
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  46.  5
    Readings in Applied Microeconomics: The Power of the Market.Craig Newmark (ed.) - 2009 - Routledge.
    A central concern of economics is how society allocates its resources. Modern economies rely on two institutions to allocate: markets and governments. But how much of the allocating should be performed by markets and how much by governments? This collection of readings will help students appreciate the power of the market. It supplements theoretical explanations of how markets work with concrete examples, addresses questions about whether markets actually work well and offers evidence that supposed "market failures" are not as serious (...)
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  47. Craig on the Resurrection: A Defense.Stephen T. Davis - 2020 - Socio-Historical Examination of Religion and Ministry 2 (1):28-35.
    This article is a rebuttal to Robert G. Cavin and Carlos A. Colombetti’s article, “Assessing the Resurrection Hypothesis: Problems with Craig’s Inference to the Best Explanation,” which argues that the Standard Model of current particle physics entails that non-physical things (like a supernatural God or a supernaturally resurrected body) can have no causal contact with the physical universe. As such, they argue that William Lane Craig’s resurrection hypothesis is not only incompatible with the notion of Jesus physically appearing (...)
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  48. Theism, atheism, and big bang cosmology.William Lane Craig & Quentin Smith - 1993 - New York: Oxford University Press. Edited by Quentin Smith.
    Contemporary science presents us with the remarkable theory that the universe began to exist about fifteen billion years ago with a cataclysmic explosion called "the Big Bang." The question of whether Big Bang cosmology supports theism or atheism has long been a matter of discussion among the general public and in popular science books, but has received scant attention from philosophers. This book sets out to fill this gap by means of a sustained debate between two philosophers, William Lane (...) and Quentin Smith, who defend opposing positions. Craig argues that the Big Bang that began the universe was created by God, while Smith argues that the Big Bang has no cause. Alternating chapters by the two philosophers criticize and attempt to refute preceding arguments. Their arguments are based on Einstein's theory of relativity and include a discussion of the new quantum cosmology recently developed by Stephen Hawking and popularized in A Brief History of Time. (shrink)
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  49.  24
    From Athens to Jerusalem: The Love of Wisdom and the Love of God. By Stephen R. L. Clark. [REVIEW]Craig Staudenbaur - 1987 - Modern Schoolman 64 (3):202-205.
  50. On God and Our Ultimate Purpose.Stephen Maitzen - 2011 - Free Inquiry 31:35-37.
    William Lane Craig often defends theism by arguing that human life is meaningful only if it has ultimate significance, and it has ultimate significance only if God exists to give human life ultimate purpose. Developing an idea from Thomas Nagel, I rebut Craig's argument. I contend that the concept of ultimate purpose is incoherent, and hence ultimate significance is impossible even if God exists. Ultimate significance is a fantasy that shouldn't draw anyone to theism.
     
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