Results for 'Creativity'

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  1.  53
    Attributing Creativity.Elliot Samuel Paul & Dustin Stokes - forthcoming - In Berys Gaut & Matthew Kieran (eds.), Creativity and Philosophy. Routledge.
    Three kinds of things may be creative: persons, processes, and products. The standard definition of creativity, used nearly by consensus in psychological research, focuses specifically on products and says that a product is creative if and only if it is new and valuable. We argue that at least one further condition is necessary for a product to be creative: it must have been produced by the right kind of process. We argue furthermore that this point has an interesting epistemological (...)
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  2.  11
    Selective Realism Vs. Individual Realism for Scientific Creativity.Seungbae Park - 2017 - Creativity Studies 10 (1):97-107.
    Individual realism asserts that our best scientific theories are (approximately) true. In contrast, selective realism asserts that only the stable posits of our best scientific theories are true. Hence, individual realism recommends that we accept more of what our best scientific theories say about the world than selective realism does. The more scientists believe what their theories say about the world, the more they are motivated to exercise their imaginations and think up new theories and experiments. Therefore, individual realism better (...)
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  3.  45
    How to Foster Scientists' Creativity.Seungbae Park - 2016 - Creativity Studies 9 (2):117-126.
    Scientific progress can be credited to creative scientists, who constantly ideate new theories and experiments. I explore how the three central positions in philosophy of science – scientific realism, scientific pessimism, and instrumentalism – are related to the practical issue of how scientists’ creativity can be fostered. I argue that realism encourages scientists to entertain new theories and experiments, pessimism discourages them from doing so, and instrumentalism falls in between realism and pessimism in terms of its effects on scientists’ (...)
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  4. An Experiential Account of Creativity.Bence Nanay - 2014 - In Elliot Paul & Scott Barry Kaufman (eds.), The Philosophy of Creativity. Oxford University Press.
    The aim of the paper is to argue that the difference between creative and non-creative mental processes is not a functional/computational, but an experiential one. In other words, what is distinctive about creative mental processes is not the functional/computational mechanism that leads to the emergence of a creative idea, be it the recombination of old ideas or the transformation of one’s conceptual space, but the way in which this mental process is experienced. The explanatory power of the functional/computational theories and (...)
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  5. The Origins of Creativity.Peter Carruthers & Elizabeth Picciuto - forthcoming - In E. Paul & S. Kaufman (eds.), The Philosophy of Creativity. Oxford University Press.
    The goal of this chapter is to provide an integrated evolutionary and developmental account of the emergence of distinctively-human creative capacities. Our main thesis is that childhood pretend play is a uniquely human adaptation that functions in part to enhance adult forms of creativity. We review evidence that is consistent with such an account, and contrast our proposal favorably with a number of alternatives.
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  6. Machine Predictability Versus Human Creativity.Richard McDonough - 1993 - In Terry Dartnall (ed.), Artificial Intelligence and Creativity. pp. 117-138.
    The paper argues that machines cannot duplicate human linguistic creativity because linguistic meaning is context dependent in a way that eludes any machine.
     
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  7.  26
    Corporate Ethical Values, Group Creativity, Job Satisfaction and Turnover Intention: The Impact of Work Context on Work Response. [REVIEW]Sean Valentine, Lynn Godkin, Gary M. Fleischman & Roland Kidwell - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 98 (3):353 - 372.
    A corporate culture strengthened by ethical values and other positive business practices likely yields more favorable employee work responses. Thus, the purpose of this study was to assess the degree to which perceived corporate ethical values work in concert with group creativity to influence both job satisfaction and turnover intention. Using a self-report questionnaire, information was collected from 781 healthcare and administrative employees working at a multi-campus education-based healthcare organization. Additional survey data was collected from a comparative convenience sample (...)
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  8. The AHA! Experience: Creativity Through Emergent Binding in Neural Networks.Paul Thagard & Terrence C. Stewart - 2011 - Cognitive Science 35 (1):1-33.
    Many kinds of creativity result from combination of mental representations. This paper provides a computational account of how creative thinking can arise from combining neural patterns into ones that are potentially novel and useful. We defend the hypothesis that such combinations arise from mechanisms that bind together neural activity by a process of convolution, a mathematical operation that interweaves structures. We describe computer simulations that show the feasibility of using convolution to produce emergent patterns of neural activity that can (...)
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  9.  23
    The Determinants of Green Product Development Performance: Green Dynamic Capabilities, Green Transformational Leadership, and Green Creativity[REVIEW]Yu-Shan Chen & Ching-Hsun Chang - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 116 (1):107-119.
    Because no previous literature discusses the determinants of green product development performance, this study develops an original framework to fill the research gap. This study explores the influences of green dynamic capabilities and green transformational leadership on green product development performance and investigates the mediation role of green creativity. The results demonstrate that green dynamic capabilities and green transformational leadership positively influence green creativity and green product development performance. Besides, this study indicates that the positive relationships between green (...)
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  10.  17
    Does Moral Leadership Enhance Employee Creativity? Employee Identification with Leader and Leader–Member Exchange in the Chinese Context.Qinxuan Gu, Thomas Li-Ping Tang & Wan Jiang - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 126 (3):513-529.
    In this article, drawing from a relational perspective, we explore the relationship between moral leadership and employee creativity, treat employee identification with leader and leader–member exchange as two mediators, and develop a new theoretical model of employee creativity. Our data collected from 160 supervisor–subordinate dyads in the People’s Republic of China demonstrate that moral leadership is positively related to both employee identification with leader and LMX. Further, employee identification with leader partially mediates the relationship between moral leadership and (...)
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  11. Imagination and Creativity.Dustin Stokes - 2016 - In Amy Kind (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of the Philosophy of the Imagination. Routledge.
    This paper surveys historical and recent philosophical discussions of the relations between imagination and creativity. In the first two sections, it covers two insufficiently studied analyses of the creative imagination, that of Kant and Sartre, respectively. The next section discusses imagination and its role in scientific discovery, with particular emphasis on the writings of Michael Polanyi, and on thought experiments and experimental design. The final section offers a brief discussion of some very recent work done on conceptual relations between (...)
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  12.  76
    Fostering Creativity and Innovation Without Encouraging Unethical Behavior.S. Baucus Melissa, I. Norton William, A. Baucus David & E. Human Sherrie - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 81 (1):97-115.
    Many prescriptions offered in the literature for enhancing creativity and innovation in organizations raise ethical concerns, yet creativity researchers rarely discuss ethics. We identify four categories of behavior proffered as a means for fostering creativity that raise serious ethical issues: breaking rules and standard operating procedures; challenging authority and avoiding tradition; creating conflict, competition and stress; and taking risks. We discuss each category, briefly identifying research supporting these prescriptions for fostering creativity and then we delve into (...)
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  13.  18
    From Increasing Gas Efficiency to Enhancing Creativity: It Pays to Go Green. [REVIEW]Thomas Li-Ping Tang - 2010 - Journal of Business Ethics 94 (2):149 - 155.
    What are the common denominators for success when we consider increasing gas efficiency and enhancing creativity in organizations? As an analogy, the principles of increasing gas efficiency are applicable to enhancing creativity in organizations: Plan activities in advance, allocate sufficient time, resources, and set a SMART goal with clear priority and focus. Identify talent in ourselves and others and do not fall into the temptation of following others. Big ideas take time. Maintain momentum, avoid interruptions, incorporate new technologies, (...)
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  14.  40
    Free Will Skepticism and the Question of Creativity: Creativity, Desert, and Self-Creation.D. Caruso Gregg - 2016 - Ergo, an Open Access Journal of Philosophy 3.
    Free will skepticism maintains that what we do, and the way we are, is ultimately the result of factors beyond our control and because of this we are never morally responsible for our actions in the basic desert sense—the sense that would make us truly deserving of praise and blame. In recent years, a number of contemporary philosophers have advanced and defended versions of free will skepticism, including Derk Pereboom (2001, 2014), Galen Strawson (2010), Neil Levy (2011), Bruce Waller (2011, (...)
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  15. Naturalistic Approaches to Creativity.Dustin Stokes & Elliot Paul - 2016 - In J. Sytsma W. Buckwalter (ed.), The Blackwell Companion to Experimental Philosophy.
    We offer a brief characterization of creativity, followed by a review of some of the reasons people have been skeptical about the possibility of explaining creativity. We then survey some of the recent work on creativity that is naturalistic in the sense that it presumes creativity is natural (as opposed to magical, occult, or supernatural) and is therefore amenable to scientific inquiry. This work is divided into two categories. The broader category is empirical philosophy, which draws (...)
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  16. The Synergetic View of Human Creativity.Helena Knyazeva - 1998 - Evolution and Cognition 4 (2):145-155.
    The heuristic value of synergetic models of evolving and self-organizing complex systems as well as their application to epistemological problems is shown in this paper. Nonlinear synergetic models turn out to be fruitful in comprehending epistemological problems such as the nature of human creativity, the functioning of human intuition and imagination, the historical development of science and culture. In the light of synergetics creative thinking can be viewed as a selforganization and self-completion of images and thoughts, filling up gaps (...)
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  17.  20
    Governance in the Participative Organisation: Freedom, Creativity and Ethics. [REVIEW]Jane Collier & Rafael Esteban - 1999 - Journal of Business Ethics 21 (2-3):173 - 188.
    Organizations in changing environments need to become flexible, responsive and participative. We develop an understanding of governance in these organizations by drawing analogies between organization theory and theories of non-linear dynamics. We identify freedom and creativity as driving principles in 'chaotic' participative organizations, and explore the ethics of their exercise within organizational communities of practice, communities of discernment and communities of commitment.
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  18.  82
    Situated Cognition, Dynamic Systems, and Art: On Artistic Creativity and Aesthetic Experience.Ingar Brinck - 2007 - Janus Head 9 (2):407-431.
    It is argued that the theory of situated cognition together with dynamic systems theory can explain the core of artistic practice and aesthetic experience, and furthermore paves the way for an account of how artist and audience can meet via the artist’s work. The production and consumption of art is an embodied practice, firmly based in perception and action, and supported by features of the local, agent-centered and global, socio-cultural contexts. Artistic creativity and aesthetic experience equally result from the (...)
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  19.  54
    The Limits To Creativity In Education: Dilemmas For The Educator.Anna Craft - 2003 - British Journal of Educational Studies 51 (2):113-127.
    Since the end of the 1990s, creativity has become a growing area of interest once more within education and wider society. In England creativity is now named within the school curriculum and in the curriculum for children aged 3-5. There are numerous government and other initiatives to foster individual and collective creativity, some of this through partnership activity bringing together the arts, technology, science and the social sciences. As far as education is concerned, this growth in emphasis (...)
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  20.  48
    Exploring Creativity in the Design Process: A Systems-Semiotic Perspective.Argyris Arnellos, Thomas Spyrou & Ioannis Darzentas - 2007 - Cybernetics and Human Knowing 14 (1):37-64.
    This paper attempts to establish a systems-semiotic framework explaining creativity in the design process, where the design process is considered to have as its basis the cognitive process. The design process is considered as the interaction between two or more cognitive systems resulting in a purposeful and ongoing transformation of their already complex representational structures and the production of newer ones, in order to fulfill an ill-defined goal. Creativity is considered as the result of an emergence of organizational (...)
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  21.  85
    On Creativity and the Philosophy of the Supranational State.Barry Smith & Wolfgang Grassl - 2004 - In Tamás Demeter (ed.), Essays on Wittgenstein and Austrian Philosophy. Rodopi. pp. 25-39.
    Building on the writings of Wittgenstein on rule-following and deviance, Kristóf Nyíri advanced a theory of creativity as consisting in a fusion of conflicting rules or disciplines. Only such fusion can produce something that is both intrinsically new and yet capable of being apprehended by and passed on to a wider community. Creativity, on this view, involves not the breaking of rules, or the deliberate cultivation of deviant social habits, but rather the acceptance of enriched systems of rules, (...)
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  22.  25
    Its Own Reward: A Phenomenological Study of Artistic Creativity.David Rawlings & Barnaby Nelson - 2007 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 38 (2):217-255.
    The phenomenology of the creative process has been a neglected area of creativity research. The current study investigated the phenomenology of artistic creativity through semi-structured interviews with 11 artists. The findings consisted of 19 interlinked constituents, with 3 dynamics operating within these constituents: an intuition-analysis dynamic, a union-division dynamic, and a freedom-constraint dynamic. The findings are discussed in relation to the issues of creativity and spirituality, intuition and analysis, the creative synthesis, affective components, and flow. The findings (...)
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  23.  35
    Moral Creativity in Science and Engineering.Mike W. Martin - 2006 - Science and Engineering Ethics 12 (3):421-433.
    Creativity in science and engineering has moral significance and deserves attention within professional ethics, in at least three areas. First, much scientific and technological creativity constitutes moral creativity because it generates moral benefits, is motivated by moral concern, and manifests virtues such as beneficence, courage, and perseverance. Second, creativity contributes to the meaning that scientists and engineers derive from their work, thereby connecting with virtues such as authenticity and also faults arising from Faustian trade-offs. Third, morally (...)
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  24.  72
    Some Empirical Criteria for Attributing Creativity to a Computer Program.Graeme Ritchie - 2007 - Minds and Machines 17 (1):67-99.
    Over recent decades there has been a growing interest in the question of whether computer programs are capable of genuinely creative activity. Although this notion can be explored as a purely philosophical debate, an alternative perspective is to consider what aspects of the behaviour of a program might be noted or measured in order to arrive at an empirically supported judgement that creativity has occurred. We sketch out, in general abstract terms, what goes on when a potentially creative program (...)
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  25.  59
    Darwinian Creativity and Memetics.Maria Kronfeldner - 2011 - Acumen Publishing.
    The book examines how Darwinism has been used to explain novelty and change in culture through the Darwinian approach to creativity and the theory of memes. The first claims that creativity is based on a Darwinian process of blind variation and selection, while the latter claims that culture is based on and explained by units - memes - that are similar to genes. Both theories try to describe and explain mind and culture by applying Darwinism by way of (...)
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  26.  45
    Developing Creativity: Artificial Barriers in Artificial Intelligence. [REVIEW]Kyle Jennings - 2010 - Minds and Machines 20 (4):489-501.
    The greatest rhetorical challenge to developers of creative artificial intelligence systems is convincingly arguing that their software is more than just an extension of their own creativity. This paper suggests that “creative autonomy,” which exists when a system not only evaluates creations on its own, but also changes its standards without explicit direction, is a necessary condition for making this argument. Rather than requiring that the system be hermetically sealed to avoid perceptions of human influence, developing creative autonomy is (...)
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  27.  36
    Art and Creativity in the Global Economies of Education.Elizabeth Grierson - 2011 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (4):336-350.
    Creativity: what might this mean for art and art educators in the creative economies of globalisation? The task of this discussion is to look at the state of creativity and its role in education, in particular art education, and to seek some understanding of the register of creativity, how it is shaped, and how legitimated in the globalised world dominated by input-output, means-end, economically driven thinking, expectations and demands. With the help of Heidegger some crucial questions are (...)
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  28.  7
    Linguistic Creativity.Eugen Fischer - 2000 - Kluwer Academic Publishers.
    How is it that speakers can get to know the meaning of any of indefinitely many sentences they have never encountered before? - the 'problem of linguistic creativity' posed by this question is a core problem of both philosophy of language and theoretical linguistics, and has sparked off a considerable amount of work in the philosophy of mind. The book establishes the failure of the familiar - compositional - approach to this problem, and then takes a radically new start: (...)
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  29.  35
    The Role of Luck in Originality and Creativity.Peg Zeglin Brand Weiser - 2015 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 73 (1):31-55.
    In this article I explore the concept of originality from several viewpoints. Within the world of printmaking, I show that while print dealers may draw attention to originality in order to enhance economic value, artists emphasize the aesthetic value of a work based on the freedom to express artistic intent and to experiment with techniques of the medium. Within the worlds of philosophy and to some extent, psychology, “originality” has been misleadingly tied to the notions of “creativity” and “genius,” (...)
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  30.  10
    Creativity as Openness: Improvising Health and Care 'Situations'. [REVIEW]James Oliver - 2009 - Health Care Analysis 17 (4):318-330.
    Creativity has become an oft-used word in UK public policy, but perhaps it is also under-imagined. This paper contends that there is an instrumental tendency to narrowly frame creativity as innovation, implying a reproducible product, instead of more openly as improvisation, a situational, embodied and temporal process. This is not a simple dichotomy (innovation and improvisation, product and process, can be mutually informing concepts), nor is it specifically a question of definition; rather, it relates to an ontological orientation, (...)
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  31.  41
    A Journey Into Chaos: Creativity and the Unconscious.N. C. Andreasen - 2011 - Mens Sana Monographs 9 (1):42.
    The capacity to be creative, to produce new concepts, ideas, inventions, objects or art, is perhaps the most important attribute of the human brain. We know very little, however, about the nature of creativity or its neural basis. Some important questions include how should we define creativity? How is it related (or unrelated) to high intelligence? What psychological processes or environmental circumstance cause creative insights to occur? How is it related to conscious and unconscious processes? What is happening (...)
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  32.  45
    Performing the Unexpected Improvisation and Artistic Creativity.Alessandro Bertinetto - 2012 - Daimon: Revista Internacional de Filosofía 57:117-135.
    In this paper I suggest that we look to improvisation in order to understand artistic creativity. Indeed, instead of being anti-artistic in nature, due to its supposed unpreparedness, inaccuracy, and repetitive monotony, improvisation in art exemplifies and 'fuels' artistic creativity as such. I elucidate the relationship between improvisation and artistic creativity in four steps. I discuss the concept of creativity in general (I) and in reference to art (II). Then I focus on the properties and the (...)
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  33.  72
    The Philosophical Roots of Western and Eastern Conceptions of Creativity.Weihua Niu & Robert J. Sternberg - 2006 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 26 (1-2):18-38.
    This essay reviews the philosophical roots and the development of the concept of creativity in the West and East. In particular, two conceptions of creativity that originated in the West--divinely inspired creativity and individual creativity--are discussed and compared to the two Eastern conceptions of creativity that are rooted in ancient Chinese philosophical thought--natural and individual creativity. Both Western and Eastern conceptions of individual creativity come from a theistic or cosmic tradition of either divinely (...)
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  34.  89
    Unconscious Thought, Intuition, and Visual Imagery: A Critique of "Working Memory, Cerebellum, and Creativity".Arthur I. Miller - 2007 - Creativity Research Journal 19 (1):47-48.
  35.  19
    Investigating the Development of Creativity : The Sahlin Hypothesis.Ingar Brinck - 2015 - Against Boredom : 17 Essays.
    How should the development of creativity be approached? Many accounts of children’s creativity focus on the relation between creativity and pretend play, placing make-believe and the mental exploration of possible scenarios about the world at the fore. Often divergent thinking and story-telling are used to measure creativity with fluency, originality, and flexibility as indicators. I will argue that the strong focus on conceptual processes and higher-order thought leaves procedural forms of creativity in the dark and (...)
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  36.  70
    Could a Created Being Ever Be Creative? Some Philosophical Remarks on Creativity and AI Development.Y. J. Erden - 2010 - Minds and Machines 20 (3):349-362.
    Creativity has a special role in enabling humans to develop beyond the fulfilment of simple primary functions. This factor is significant for Artificial Intelligence (AI) developers who take replication to be the primary goal, since moves toward creating autonomous artificial-beings beg questions about their potential for creativity. Using Wittgenstein’s remarks on rule-following and language-games, I argue that although some AI programs appear creative, to call these programmed acts creative in our terms is to misunderstand the use of this (...)
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  37.  19
    Convolution and Modal Representations in Thagard and Stewart’s Neural Theory of Creativity: A Critical Analysis.Jean-Frédéric de Pasquale & Pierre Poirier - 2016 - Synthese 193 (5):1535-1560.
    According to Thagard and Stewart :1–33, 2011), creativity results from the combination of neural representations, and combination results from convolution, an operation on vectors defined in the holographic reduced representation framework. They use these ideas to understand creativity as it occurs in many domains, and in particular in science. We argue that, because of its algebraic properties, convolution alone is ill-suited to the role proposed by Thagard and Stewart. The semantic pointer concept allows us to see how we (...)
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  38.  49
    What Creativity Isn't: The Presumptions of Instrumental and Individual Justifications for Creativity in Education.Howard Gibson - 2005 - British Journal of Educational Studies 53 (2):148 - 167.
    Creativity is a popular but heterogeneous word in educational parlance these days. By looking at a selection of recent discourses that refer to creativity to sustain their positions, the paper suggests that two key themes emerge, both with questionable assumptions. Romantic individualists would return us to a naïve bygone age of authentic self-expression, while politicians and economists would use the term instrumentally by binding it to the future needs of the workforce without questioning substantive issues. Cultural theories of (...)
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  39.  47
    Improvisation, Creativity, and Formulaic Language.Ian MacKenzie - 2000 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 58 (2):173-179.
    Speakers routinely rely on a vast store of fixed and semi-fixed institutionalized utterances. In our mother tongue, we know how to combine pre-patterned phrases, complete semi-fixed expressions, and produce deviant versions for humorous effect. There are analogies with the way traditional folk musicians embellish tunes with a largely fixed structure, and the way jazz musicians improvise, and also with oral traditions in which poets composed or improvised tales during performance by using fixed formulas and formulaic phrases (though without the metrical (...)
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  40.  57
    Aesthetic Creativity: Insights From Classical Literary Theory on Creative Learning.Tomas Georg Hellström - 2011 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (4):321-335.
    This paper addresses the subject of textual creativity by drawing on work done in classical literary theory and criticism, specifically new criticism, structuralism and early poststructuralism. The question of how readers and writers engage creatively with the text is closely related to educational concerns, though they are often thought of as separate disciplines. Modern literary theory in many ways collapses this distinction in its concern for how literariness is achieved and, specifically, how ‘literary quality’ is accomplished in the textual (...)
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  41.  14
    Enhancing Creativity, Innovation and Cooperation.Robert C. Muller - 1993 - AI and Society 7 (1):4-39.
    The paper explores the creative thinking process and throws light on creativity enhancement. From the perspective of possible creativity enhancement both the characteristics of creativity and the creative thinking process are discussed, together with an analysis of the process and its common factors. Constraints on innovation (as a special type of creativity), innovation management and the acceptance of change are discussed; creativity between cooperating individuals is also examined. Some possible computer-based tools to enhance creativity, (...)
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  42.  40
    Special Topic: Creativity in Christianity and Confucianism. [REVIEW]Cummings Neville Robert - 2007 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 6 (2):125-130.
    In order respectfully and adequately to compare Confucian and Christian conceptions of creativity, it is necessary to have proper comparative categories. Put roughly, we need to know what creativity is in order to see how Confucianism and Christianity have various versions of it. In respect of what do they agree or differ? So the first order of business is to put forward, however briefly, a theory of creativity in light of which comparisons can be made. Creativity, (...)
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  43.  20
    Aesthetic, Emotion and Empathetic Imagination: Beyond Innovation to Creativity in the Health and Social Care Workforce.Deborah Munt & Janet Hargreaves - 2009 - Health Care Analysis 17 (4):285-295.
    The Creativity in Health and Care Workshops programme was a series of investigative workshops aimed at interrogating the subject of creativity with an over-arching objective of extending the understanding of the problems and possibilities of applying creativity within the health and care sector workforce. Included in the workshops was a concept analysis, which attempted to gain clearer understanding of creativity and innovation within this context. The analysis led to emergent theory regarding the central importance of aesthetics, (...)
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  44. Emergence and Creativity: Five Degrees of Freedom.Richard McDonough - 2002 - In Terry Dartnall (ed.), Creativity, Cognition and Knowledge. pp. 283-302, 314-320.
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  45.  16
    The Example of the Unicorn: A Knowledge-Based Approach to Scientific Creativity and the Growth of Knowledge. [REVIEW]Kenneth R. Blochowiak - 1993 - AI and Society 7 (1):52-61.
    In the course of researching the question ‘What does it mean for knowledge to grow?’, the author has developed a large and unique compendium of components, some of which are knowledge systems that serve as research and creativity support systems. The self-modifying, self-effecting creative process and the results of developing and working with these systems, using novel methods and drawing on eclectic sources, is discussed.
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  46.  16
    Freedom as Creativity: On the Origin of the Positive Concept of Liberty.Boris DeWiel - 2003 - Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 2 (4):42-57.
    The concept of positive liberty includes both the regulative autonomy to do what we will and the constitutive autonomy to become what we will. However, the latter represents the full meaning of the idea. Liberty in this meaning is a creative power: we are most free in the positive sense when we give our defining constitutive rules to ourselves. The original conceptual model for liberty as creativity did not belong to classical Greek tradition but came to us from Judaism. (...)
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  47.  11
    Limits of Global Growth, Stagnation, Creativity and International Stability.V. Tsyganov - 2014 - AI and Society 29 (2):259-266.
    Arising restrictions of global economic growth due to limited natural resources and capacity of the biosphere adversely affect on people level of life and future expectation. That leads to mass depression and social instability. To consider this problem, psycho-physiological model of onward hedonist in consumer society is developed and investigated. This model is based on the fact that human nature generates a growing desire, needs to progress. After reaching the limits of growth, member of consumer society feel persistent negative emotions (...)
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  48.  21
    On Creativity: A Brainstorming Session.Ulrich Brockling - 2006 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 38 (4):513-521.
    The article problematizes in aphoristic condensation the heterogeneous concepts of creativity in philosophy, psychology and sociology and outlines their paradoxes. Creativity in these concepts is tied to the human potential to bring into being something new and to the capacity of drawing differences. In its contingency, creativity is ambivalent to a high degree—at one and the same time a desirable resource and a threatening potential. So on the one hand, creativity is meant to be mobilized and (...)
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  49.  2
    'Wittgenstein and the Creativity of Language', Edited by Grève and Mácha. [REVIEW]Daniel Sharp - 2016 - Nordic Wittgenstein Review 5 (2):226-231.
    Book review of Grève, Sebastian Sunday and Mácha, Jakub 2016, _Wittgenstein and the Creativity of Language_, London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2016, xxi + 318pp.
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  50.  16
    Understanding the Complex Relationship Between Creativity and Ethical Ideologies.Paul E. Bierly Iii, Robert W. Kolodinsky & Brian J. Charette - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 86 (1):101 - 112.
    The relationship between individuals' creativity and their ethical ideologies appears to be complex. Applying Forsyth's (1980, 1992) personal moral philosophy model which consists of two independent ethical ideology dimensions, idealism and relativism, we hypothesized and found support for a positive relationship between creativity and relativism. It appears that creative people are less likely than non-creative people to follow universal rules in their moral decision making. However, contrary to our hypothesis and the general stereotype that creative people are less (...)
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