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  1.  8
    Teaching Anger.Cris Mayo - forthcoming - Philosophy of Education:1-19.
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  2.  2
    Philosophy of Education in a New Key: Snapshot 2020 From the United States and Canada.Liz Jackson, Kal Alston, Lauren Bialystok, Larry Blum, Nicholas C. Burbules, Ann Chinnery, David T. Hansen, Kathy Hytten, Cris Mayo, Trevor Norris, Sarah M. Stitzlein, Winston C. Thompson, Leonard Waks, Michael A. Peters & Marek Tesar - forthcoming - Educational Philosophy and Theory:1-17.
    This article shares reflections from members of the community of philosophers of education in the United States and Canada who were invited to express their insights in response to the theme ‘Snaps...
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  3.  16
    The Uses of Foucault.Cris Mayo - 2000 - Educational Theory 50 (1):103-116.
  4.  20
    Pushing the Limits of Liberalism: Queerness, Children, and the Future.Cris Mayo - 2006 - Educational Theory 56 (4):469-487.
    In this essay, Cris Mayo describes a tension between recognizing gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender people by law and giving them certain legal rights on the basis of identity, on the one hand, and enabling queer people, not always fully recognizable as inhabiting particular identity categories, to live their potentials, on the other. Laws and rights regulate particular kinds of people, and while lgbt people have pursued civil rights energetically for the last sixty years or so, their queerness continues to (...)
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  5.  43
    The Binds That Tie: Civility and Social Difference.Cris Mayo - 2002 - Educational Theory 52 (2):169-186.
  6.  17
    Unexpected Generosity and Inevitable Trespass: Rethinking Intersectionality.Cris Mayo - 2015 - Educational Studies: A Jrnl of the American Educ. Studies Assoc 51 (3):244-251.
  7.  21
    Special Issue on Humor, Laughter, and Philosophy of Education: Introduction.Mordechai Gordon & Cris Mayo - 2014 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 46 (2):1-5.
  8.  68
    Philosophy of Education is Bent.Cris Mayo - 2011 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 30 (5):471-476.
    Troubled times in education means that philosophers of education, who seem to never stop making defenses of our field, have to do so with more flexibility and a greater understanding of how peripheral we may have become. The only thing worse than a defensive philosopher is a confident and certain philosopher, so it may be that our very marginality will give us renewed energies for problematizing education. Occupying our marginal position carefully and in concert with other marginal inquiries, I think, (...)
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  9.  18
    Unsettled Relations: Schools, Gay Marriage, and Educating for Sexuality.Cris Mayo - 2013 - Educational Theory 63 (5):543-558.
    In this article, Cris Mayo examines the relationship among anti-LGBTQ policies, gay marriage, and sexuality education. Her concern is that because gay marriage is insufficiently different from heterosexual marriage, adding it as an issue to curriculum or broader culture debate elides rather than addresses sexual difference. In other words, marriage may be an assimilative aspiration that closes down discussions of what sexuality is and can mean, that sidesteps other related social issues such as health care for all, and that reinforces (...)
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  10.  2
    Introduction.Mordechai Gordon & Cris Mayo - 2014 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 46 (2):115-119.
  11.  37
    Imagining the Future: What Anarchism Brings to Education.Jennifer Logue & Cris Mayo - 2009 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 43 (1):159-165.
    The authors review Judith Suissa's provocative book, Anarchism and Education: A Philosophical Perspective, a text that demonstrates the central role of education in anarchist theory. Suissa compellingly argues against the charges that anarchism is overly idealistic and impractical, instead seeing its potential for innovative and liberatory educational change. The authors suggest, however, that an enhanced conversation among critical pedagogy, antiracist pedagogy and anarchist thinking on education can help to show both the continued relevance of radical and creative thinking, and that (...)
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  12.  3
    Imagining the Future.Jennifer Logue & Cris Mayo - 2009 - Philosophy of Education 43 (1):159-165.
    The authors review Judith Suissa's provocative book, Anarchism and Education: A Philosophical Perspective, a text that demonstrates the central role of education in anarchist theory. Suissa compellingly argues against the charges that anarchism is overly idealistic and impractical, instead seeing its potential for innovative and liberatory educational change. The authors suggest, however, that an enhanced conversation among critical pedagogy, antiracist pedagogy and anarchist thinking on education can help to show both the continued relevance of radical and creative thinking, and that (...)
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  13.  18
    Humorous Relations: Attentiveness, Pleasure and Risk.Cris Mayo - 2014 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 46 (2):1-12.
    This article focuses on the structures of humor and joke telling that require particular kinds of attentiveness and particular relationships between speaker and audience, or more specifically, between classmates. First, I will analyze the pedagogical and relational preconditions that are necessary for humor to work. If humor is to work well, the person engaging in humor needs to gauge their interlocutors carefully. I discuss, too, the kinds of listening necessary for listening for the joke, including attentiveness to complex possibilities for (...)
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  14.  39
    Incongruity and Provisional Safety: Thinking Through Humor.Cris Mayo - 2010 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 29 (6):509-521.
    The aim of this paper is to reconceive safety as a form of relation embedded in particular ways of speaking, listening and thinking. Moving away from safety as a relation that is achieved once and for all and afterwards remains safe avoids some of the disappointments of discourses of safety that seem to promise once a risk is taken or a gap is bridged that thereafter relations among people will be easier and calmer. This bumpier version of safety suggests that (...)
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  15.  36
    Testing Resistance: Busno‐Cratic Power, Standardized Tests, and Care of the Self.Cris Mayo - 2005 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 37 (3):357–363.
    I will argue in what follows, following the insights of James Marshall on busno‐cratic power, that resistance to this new power is already well underway, and that this resistance is potentially problematic and potentially transgressive 1 . The self is not only a chooser in busno‐cratic land, it is also re‐commodifying itself and in so doing, beginning to struggle at the limits of its commodified situation. I will argue that commodified selves, as much as they are constrained, are also potent (...)
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  16.  69
    The Center Must Not Hold: White Women Philosophers on the Whiteness of Philosophy.George Yancy, Barbara Applebaum, Susan E. Babbitt, Alison Bailey, Berit Brogaard, Lisa Heldke, Sarah Hoagland, Cynthia Kaufman, Crista Lebens, Cris Mayo, Alexis Shotwell, Shannon Sullivan, Lisa Tessman & Audrey Thompson - 2010 - Lexington Books.
    In this collection, white women philosophers engage boldly in critical acts of exploring ways of naming and disrupting whiteness in terms of how it has defined the conceptual field of philosophy. Focuses on the whiteness of the epistemic and value-laden norms within philosophy itself, the text dares to identify the proverbial elephant in the room known as white supremacy and how that supremacy functions as the measure of reason, knowledge, and philosophical intelligibility.
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