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Cristina Richie [16]Cristina S. Richie [1]
  1.  36
    Voluntary Sterilization for Childfree Women.Cristina Richie - 2013 - Hastings Center Report 43 (6):36-44.
  2.  42
    Lessons From Queer Bioethics: A Response to Timothy F. Murphy.Cristina Richie - 2016 - Bioethics 30 (5):365-371.
    ‘Bioethics still has important work to do in helping to secure status equality for LGBT people’ writes Timothy F. Murphy in a recent Bioethics editorial. The focus of his piece, however, is much narrower than human rights, medical care for LGBT people, or ending the HIV/AIDS pandemic. Rather, he is primarily concerned with sexuality and gender identity, and the medical intersections thereof. It is the objective of this response to provide an alternate account of bioethics from a Queer perspective. I (...)
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  3.  3
    Guest Editorial: Sustainability and Bioethics: Where We Have Been, Where We Are, Where We Are Going.Cristina Richie - 2020 - The New Bioethics 26 (2):82-90.
    Volume 26, Issue 2, June 2020, Page 82-90.
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  4.  7
    What Would an Environmentally Sustainable Reproductive Technology Industry Look Like?Cristina Richie - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (5):383-387.
  5.  6
    Can United States Healthcare Become Environmentally Sustainable? Towards Green Healthcare Reform.Cristina Richie - 2020 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 48 (4):643-652.
    In 2014, the United States health care industry produced an estimated 480 million metric tons of carbon dioxide ; nearly 8% of the country's total emissions. The importance of sustainability in health care — as a business reliant on fossil fuels for transportation, energy, and operational functioning — is slowly being recognized. These efforts to green health care are incomplete, since they only focus on health care structures. The therapeutic relationship is the essence of health care — not the buildings (...)
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  6.  27
    Not Sick: Liberal, Trans, and Crip Feminist Critiques of Medicalization.Cristina S. Richie - 2019 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 16 (3):375-387.
    Medicalization occurs when an aspect of embodied humanity is scrutinized by the medical industry, claimed as pathological, and subsumed under medical intervention. Numerous critiques of medicalization appear in academic literature, often put forth by bioethicists who use a variety of “lenses” to make their case. Feminist critiques of medicalization raise the concerns of the politically disenfranchised, thus seeking to protect women—particularly natal sex women—from medical exploitation. This article will focus on three feminist critiques of medicalization, which offer an alternative narrative (...)
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  7.  12
    A Queer, Feminist Bioethics Critique of Facial Feminization Surgery.Cristina Richie - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics 18 (12):33-35.
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  8.  3
    Reimagining Research Ethics to Include Environmental Sustainability: A Principled Approach, Including a Case Study of Data-Driven Health Research.Gabrielle Samuel & Cristina Richie - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:jme-2022-108489.
    In this paper we argue the need to reimagine research ethics frameworks to include notions of environmental sustainability. While there have long been calls for healthcare ethics frameworks and decision-making to include aspects of sustainability, less attention has focused on how research ethics frameworks could address this. To do this, we first describe the traditional approach to research ethics, which often relies on individualised notions of risk. We argue that we need to broaden this notion of individual risk to consider (...)
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  9.  77
    An Argument Against the Use of the Word ‘Homosexual’ in English Translations of the Bible.Cristina Richie - 2010 - Heythrop Journal 51 (5):723-729.
  10.  10
    Environmental Sustainability and the Carbon Emissions of Pharmaceuticals.Cristina Richie - 2022 - Journal of Medical Ethics 48 (5):334-337.
    The US healthcare industry emits an estimated 479 million tonnes of carbon dioxide each year; nearly 8% of the country’s total emissions. When assessed by sector, hospital care, clinical services, medical structures, and pharmaceuticals are the top emitters. For 15 years, research has been dedicated to the medical structures and equipment that contribute to carbon emissions. More recently, hospital care and clinical services have been examined. However, the carbon of pharmaceuticals is understudied. This article will focus on the carbon emissions (...)
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  11.  2
    Introduction.Cristina Richie - 2022 - Global Bioethics 33 (1):1-3.
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  12.  2
    Environmentally Sustainable Development and Use of Artificial Intelligence in Health Care.Cristina Richie - 2022 - Bioethics 36 (5):547-555.
    Bioethics, Volume 36, Issue 5, Page 547-555, June 2022.
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  13. Environmentally Sustainable Development and Use of Artificial Intelligence in Health Care.Cristina Richie - 2022 - Bioethics 36 (5):547-555.
    Bioethics, Volume 36, Issue 5, Page 547-555, June 2022.
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  14.  5
    An Evangelical Environmental Bioethic: A Proposal.Cristina Richie - 2020 - Ethics and the Environment 25 (2):29.
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  15.  18
    Global Health Care Justice, Delivery Doctors and Assisted Reproduction: Taking a Note From Catholic Social Teachings.Cristina Richie - 2015 - Developing World Bioethics 15 (3):179-190.
    This article will examine the Catholic concept of global justice within a health care framework as it relates to women's needs for delivery doctors in the developing world and women's demands for assisted reproduction in the developed world. I will first discuss justice as a theory, situating it within Catholic social teachings. The Catholic perspective on global justice in health care demands that everyone have access to basic needs before elective treatments are offered to the wealthy. After exploring specific discrepancies (...)
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  16.  2
    The Augustinian Legacy of the Procreative Marriage: Contemporary Implications and Alternatives.Cristina Richie - 2014 - Feminist Theology 23 (1):18-36.
    Augustine’s legacy, particularly his view of marriage as being primarily procreative and the sin of mutually desired non-procreative sex, has had a lasting impact on sexual theology and ethics in the Catholic Church. Yet indulging in the Augustinian legacy without reflection and regarding children as the end goal of marriage has led to the unchallenged assumption that children are needed in every marriage. I will examine the problematic concept of matrimony as a necessary producer of children through a variety of (...)
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  17.  7
    Reading Between the Lines: Infertility and Current Health Insurance Policies in the US.Cristina Richie - 2014 - Clinical Ethics 9 (4):127-134.
    This article will examine current US health insurance policies for providing fertility services and Assisted Reproductive Technologies and analyze the open-ended policies of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. This state in particular will be discussed in depth, as there are virtually no limits on infertility provision or coverage. However, tightening up Massachusetts’s health insurance policies by putting parameters on provision and coverage of Assisted Reproductive Technologies will allow the infertile to continue to access paid-for treatment while ensuring that the goal of (...)
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