15 found
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  1.  25
    Bewitchment, Biology, or Both: The Co-Existence of Natural and Supernatural Explanatory Frameworks Across Development.Cristine H. Legare & Susan A. Gelman - 2008 - Cognitive Science 32 (4):607-642.
    Three studies examined the co-existence of natural and supernatural explanations for illness and disease transmission, from a developmental perspective. The participants (5-, 7-, 11-, and 15-year-olds and adults; N = 366) were drawn from 2 Sesotho-speaking South African communities, where Western biomedical and traditional healing frameworks were both available. Results indicated that, although biological explanations for illness were endorsed at high levels, witchcraft was also often endorsed. More important, bewitchment explanations were neither the result of ignorance nor replaced by biological (...)
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  2.  15
    Competing Explanations of Competing Explanations: Accounting for Conflict Between Scientific and Folk Explanations.Andrew Shtulman & Cristine H. Legare - 2020 - Topics in Cognitive Science 12 (4):1337-1362.
    Competing Explanations of Competing Explanations: Accounting for Conflict Between Scientific and Folk ExplanationsThis paper focuses on the level of people’s explanatory reasoning. It examines why laypeople prefer folk explanations of various physical or biological phenomena to alternative, well‐understood scientific explanations. Shtulman and Legare call this psychological phenomenon “explanatory co‐existence.” On the basis of new experimental data, they evaluate two possible accounts of explanatory co‐existence, a theory‐based and an associative account, and argue that a theory‐based account is the better supported.
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  3.  37
    Explaining prompts children to privilege inductively rich properties.Caren M. Walker, Tania Lombrozo, Cristine H. Legare & Alison Gopnik - 2014 - Cognition 133 (2):343-357.
    Two studies examined the specificity of effects of explanation on learning by prompting 3- to 6-year-old children to explain a mechanical toy and comparing what they learned about the toy’s causal and non-causal properties to children who only observed the toy, both with and without accompanying verbalization. In Study 1, children were experimentally assigned to either explain or observe the mechanical toy. In Study 2, children were classified according to whether the content of their response to an undirected prompt involved (...)
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  4.  49
    Stick to the script: The effect of witnessing multiple actors on children’s imitation.Patricia A. Herrmann, Cristine H. Legare, Paul L. Harris & Harvey Whitehouse - 2013 - Cognition 129 (3):536-543.
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  5.  63
    Evaluating ritual efficacy: Evidence from the supernatural.Cristine H. Legare & André L. Souza - 2012 - Cognition 124 (1):1-15.
  6.  39
    Imitative flexibility and the development of cultural learning.Cristine H. Legare, Nicole J. Wen, Patricia A. Herrmann & Harvey Whitehouse - 2015 - Cognition 142 (C):351-361.
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  7. Searching for Control: Priming Randomness Increases the Evaluation of Ritual Efficacy.Cristine H. Legare & André L. Souza - 2014 - Cognitive Science 38 (1):152-161.
    Reestablishing feelings of control after experiencing uncertainty has long been considered a fundamental motive for human behavior. We propose that rituals (i.e., socially stipulated, causally opaque practices) provide a means for coping with the aversive feelings associated with randomness due to the perception of a connection between ritual action and a desired outcome. Two experiments were conducted (one in Brazil [n = 40] and another in the United States [n = 94]) to evaluate how the perceived efficacy of rituals is (...)
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  8.  74
    Interdisciplinary and Cross‐Cultural Perspectives on Explanatory Coexistence.Rachel E. Watson-Jones, Justin T. A. Busch & Cristine H. Legare - 2015 - Topics in Cognitive Science 7 (4):611-623.
    Natural and supernatural explanations are used to interpret the same events in a number of predictable and universal ways. Yet little is known about how variation in diverse cultural ecologies influences how people integrate natural and supernatural explanations. Here, we examine explanatory coexistence in three existentially arousing domains of human thought: illness, death, and human origins using qualitative data from interviews conducted in Tanna, Vanuatu. Vanuatu, a Melanesian archipelago, provides a cultural context ideal for examining variation in explanatory coexistence due (...)
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  9. Engaging multiple epistemologies: Implications for science education.E. M. Evans, Cristine H. Legare & K. Rosengren - 2011 - In Roger S. Taylor & Michel Ferrari (eds.), Epistemology and Science Education: Understanding the Evolution Vs. Routledge. pp. 111--139.
     
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  10.  12
    Cultural Variation in the Development of Beliefs About Conservation.Justin T. A. Busch, Rachel E. Watson‐Jones & Cristine H. Legare - 2020 - Cognitive Science 44 (10):e12909.
    Examining variation in reasoning about sustainability between diverse populations provides unique insight into how group norms surrounding resource conservation develop. Cultural institutions, such as religious organizations and formal schools, can mobilize communities to solve collective challenges associated with resource depletion. This study examined conservation beliefs in a Western industrialized (Austin, Texas, USA) and a non‐Western, subsistence agricultural community (Tanna, Vanuatu) among children, adolescents, and adults (N = 171; n = 58 7–12‐year‐olds, n = 53 13–17‐year‐olds, and n = 60 18–68‐year‐olds). (...)
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  11.  10
    The social side of innovation.Bruce Rawlings & Cristine H. Legare - 2020 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 43.
    Innovation is fundamental to cumulative culture, allowing progressive modification of existing technology. The authors define innovation as an asocial process, uninfluenced by social information. We argue that innovation is inherently social – innovation is frequently the product of modifying others' outputs, and successful innovations are acquired by others. Research should target examination of the cognitive underpinnings of socially-mediated innovations.
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  12.  21
    The functions of ritual in social groups.Rachel E. Watson-Jones & Cristine H. Legare - 2016 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 39.
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  13.  21
    The social functions of shamanism.Rachel E. Watson-Jones & Cristine H. Legare - 2018 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 41.
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  14.  13
    Developing Cross-Cultural Data Infrastructures (CCDIs) for Research in Cognitive and Behavioral Sciences.Oskar Burger, Lydia Chen, Alejandro Erut, Frankie T. K. Fong, Bruce Rawlings & Cristine H. Legare - 2023 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 14 (2):565-585.
    Cross-cultural research provides invaluable information about the origins of and explanations for cognitive and behavioral diversity. Interest in cross-cultural research is growing, but the field continues to be dominated by WEIRD (Western, Educated, Industrialized, Rich, and Democratic) researchers conducting WEIRD science with WEIRD participants, using WEIRD protocols. To make progress toward improving cognitive and behavioral science, we argue that the field needs (1) data workflows and infrastructures to support long-term high-quality research that is compliant with open-science frameworks; (2) process and (...)
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  15.  2
    Revisiting an extant framework: Concerns about culture and task generalization.Frankie T. K. Fong, Mark Nielsen & Cristine H. Legare - 2022 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 45:e257.
    The target article elaborates upon an extant theoretical framework, “Imitation and Innovation: The Dual Engines of Cultural Learning.” We raise three major concerns: (1) There is limited discussion of cross-cultural universality and variation; (2) overgeneralization of overimitation and omission of other social learning types; and (3) selective imitation in infants and toddlers is not discussed.
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