Results for 'Cultural cognition'

1000+ found
Order:
  1. Understanding and Sharing Intentions: The Origins of Cultural Cognition.Michael Tomasello, Malinda Carpenter, Josep Call, Tanya Behne & Henrike Moll - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (5):675-691.
    We propose that the crucial difference between human cognition and that of other species is the ability to participate with others in collaborative activities with shared goals and intentions: shared intentionality. Participation in such activities requires not only especially powerful forms of intention reading and cultural learning, but also a unique motivation to share psychological states with others and unique forms of cognitive representation for doing so. The result of participating in these activities is species-unique forms of (...) cognition and evolution, enabling everything from the creation and use of linguistic symbols to the construction of social norms and individual beliefs to the establishment of social institutions. In support of this proposal we argue and present evidence that great apes understand the basics of intentional action, but they still do not participate in activities involving joint intentions and attention. Human children's skills of shared intentionality develop gradually during the first 14 months of life as two ontogenetic pathways intertwine: the general ape line of understanding others as animate, goal-directed, and intentional agents; and a species-unique motivation to share emotions, experience, and activities with other persons. The developmental outcome is children's ability to construct dialogic cognitive representations, which enable them to participate in earnest in the collectivity that is human cognition. Key Words: collaboration; cooperation; cultural learning; culture; evolutionary psychology; intentions; shared intentionality; social cognition; social learning; theory of mind; joint attention. (shrink)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   289 citations  
  2.  57
    The Collaborative Emergence of Group Cognition: Commentary on Paul E. Smaldino, “The Cultural Evolution of Emergent Group-Level Traits”.John Sutton - 2014 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 37 (3):277-78.
    We extend Smaldino’s approach to collaboration and social organization in cultural evolution to include cognition. By showing how recent work on emergent group-level cognition can be incorporated within Smaldino’s framework, we extend that framework’s scope to encompass collaborative memory, decision-making, and intelligent action. We argue that beneficial effects arise only in certain forms of cognitive interdependence, in surprisingly fragile conditions.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3.  53
    The Cultural Ecosystem of Human Cognition.Edwin Hutchins - 2014 - Philosophical Psychology 27 (1):1-16.
    Everybody knows that humans are cultural animals. Although this fact is universally acknowledged, many opportunities to exploit it are overlooked. In this article, I propose shifting our attention from local examples of extended mind to the cultural-cognitive ecosystems within which human cognition is embedded. I conclude by offering a set of conjectures about the features of cultural-cognitive ecosystems.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   30 citations  
  4.  69
    On Modern Science, Human Cognition, and Cultural Diversity.Alfred Gierer - 2000 - In Preprint series, Max Planck Institute for the History of Science. MPI for the History of Science. pp. Preprint 137, 1-16.
    The development of modern science has depended strongly on specific features of the cultures involved; however, its results are widely and trans-culturally accepted and applied. The science and technology of electricity provides a particularly interesting example. It emerged as a specific product of post-Renaissance Europe, rooted in the Greek philosophical tradition that encourages explanations of nature in theoretical terms. It did not evolve in China presumably because such encouragement was missing. The trans-cultural acceptance of modern science and technology is (...)
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Altered States of Consciousness, Spirit Mediums, and Predictive Processing: A Cultural Cognition Model of Spirit Possession.R. Fischer & S. Tasananukorn - 2018 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 25 (11-12):179-203.
    Spirit possessions, trance, and other forms of altered states of consciousness are fascinating manifestations of brain states that are often seen as alien or exotic in Western media and discourse. Yet, these experiences are very common for a large number of humans around the world. In this paper we use a predictive processing perspective to examine spirit possession in Taoist rituals in Southern Thailand. These rituals involve tens of thousands of spirit mediums that enter into trance and perform various acts (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6.  51
    Climate Change and Cultural Cognition.Daniel Greco - forthcoming - In Philosophy and Climate Change.
    Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Categories of Cross-Cultural Cognition and the African Condition.Emevwo Biakolo - 1998 - In P. H. Coetzee & A. J. P. Roux (eds.), Philosophy from Africa: a text with readings. Routledge.
  8.  3
    Spiro and Lutz on Ifaluk: Toward a Synthesis of Cultural Cognition and Depth Psychology.Charles W. Nuckolls - 1996 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 24 (4):695-717.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  9.  5
    Spiro and Lutz on Ifaluk: Toward a Synthesis of Cultural Cognition and Depth Psychology.Charles W. Nuckolls - 1996 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 24 (4):695-717.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  10.  26
    Cultural Cognition.Roy G. D'Andrade - 1989 - In Michael I. Posner (ed.), Foundations of Cognitive Science. MIT Press.
  11. Cultural Cognition.P. Johnson-Laird - 1989 - In Michael I. Posner (ed.), Foundations of Cognitive Science. MIT Press. pp. 469--499.
  12. Categories of Cross-Cultural Cognition and the African Condition.Savage Versus Civilized - 2002 - In P. H. Coetzee & A. P. J. Roux (eds.), Philosophy from Africa: a text with readings. Oxford University Press.
  13.  10
    The Cerebral, Extra-Cerebral Bodily, and Socio-Cultural Dimensions of Enculturated Arithmetical Cognition.Regina E. Fabry - forthcoming - Synthese:1-36.
    Arithmetical cognition is the result of enculturation. On a personal level of analysis, enculturation is a process of structured cultural learning that leads to the acquisition of evolutionarily recent, socio-culturally shaped arithmetical practices. On a sub-personal level, enculturation is realized by learning driven plasticity and learning driven bodily adaptability, which leads to the emergence of new neural circuitry and bodily action patterns. While learning driven plasticity in the case of arithmetical practices is not consistent with modularist theories of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14.  75
    Music Perception and Cognition: A Review of Recent Cross‐Cultural Research. [REVIEW]Catherine J. Stevens - 2012 - Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (4):653-667.
    Experimental investigations of cross-cultural music perception and cognition reported during the past decade are described. As globalization and Western music homogenize the world musical environment, it is imperative that diverse music and musical contexts are documented. Processes of music perception include grouping and segmentation, statistical learning and sensitivity to tonal and temporal hierarchies, and the development of tonal and temporal expectations. The interplay of auditory, visual, and motor modalities is discussed in light of synchronization and the way music (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  15.  7
    Subject of Cognition From a Cultural Neuroscience Perspective.Valentin Bazhanov - forthcoming - Axiomathes:1-8.
    This paper assesses, from a philosophical point of view, the latest cultural neuroscience results that suggest the traditional interpretation of subject of cognition be essentially reconstructed. We must move from a universalistic interpretation of cognitive process to an interpretation taking into explicit account the socio-cultural context of the subject’s activity, as well as often its biological nature. The principle of cultural and cognitive neurobiological determination of knowledge acquisition is proposed. We claim that subject of cognition (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  16
    The Cultural Evolution of Socially Situated Cognition.Liane Gabora - manuscript
    Because human cognition is creative and socially situated, knowledge accumulates, diffuses, and gets applied in new contexts, generating cultural analogs of phenomena observed in population genetics such as adaptation and drift. It is therefore commonly thought that elements of culture evolve through natural selection. However, natural selection was proposed to explain how change accumulates despite lack of inheritance of acquired traits, as occurs with template-mediated replication. It cannot accommodate a process with significant retention of acquired or horizontally (e.g. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  17.  24
    On Modeling Cognition and Culture: Why Cultural Evolution Does Not Require Replication of Representations.Robert Boyd - 2002 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 2 (2):87-112.
    Formal models of cultural evolution analyze how cognitive processes combine with social interaction to generate the distributions and dynamics of ‘representations.’ Recently, cognitive anthropologists have criticized such models. They make three points: mental representations are non-discrete, cultural transmission is highly inaccurate, and mental representations are not replicated, but rather are ‘reconstructed’ through an inferential process that is strongly affected by cognitive ‘attractors.’ They argue that it follows from these three claims that: 1) models that assume replication or replicators (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   41 citations  
  18.  30
    Colourful Whorfian Ideas: Linguistic and Cultural Influences on the Perception and Cognition of Colour, and on the Investigation of Them.Angus Gellatly - 1995 - Mind and Language 10 (3):199-225.
  19. Cognition and Cultural Context an Inquiry Into Gadamer's Theory of Context-Dependence.Anders Odenstedt - 2001
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20.  13
    Cross-Cultural Music Cognition: Cognitive Methodology Applied to North Sami Yoiks.C. Krumhansl - 2000 - Cognition 76 (1):13-58.
  21. Irrelevant Cultural Influences on Belief.Robin McKenna - forthcoming - Journal of Applied Philosophy.
    Recent work in psychology on ‘cultural cognition’ suggests that our cultural background drives our attitudes towards a range of politically contentious issues in science such as global warming. This work is part of a more general attempt to investigate the ways in which our wants, wishes and desires impact on our assessments of information, events and theories. Put crudely, the idea is that we conform our assessments of the evidence for and against scientific theories with clear political (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22.  8
    Probing the Cultural Constitution of Causal Cognition – A Research Program.Andrea Bender & Sieghard Beller - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  23.  16
    The Cultural Part of Cognition.Roy Goodwin D'Andrade - 1981 - Cognitive Science 5 (3):179-195.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  24. The Innate Mind: Cultural and Cognition.Peter Carruthers, Stephen Laurence & Stephen Stich (eds.) - 2006 - Oxford University Press USA.
  25. The Middle East: Cultural Psychology (Culture, Cognition and Behavior).G. S. Gregg - 2005 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 26:120-152.
  26.  5
    Embodied Cognition From the Perspective of Vygotsky’s Socio-Cultural Theory.Xuejiao Zhang, Huili Wang & Dan Guo - 2018 - Philosophy Study 8 (8).
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27.  1
    Socio-Cultural Influences on Situated Cognition in Nature.Theresa Schilhab & Gertrud Lynge Esbensen - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28.  14
    Conversation, Cognition and Cultural Evolution.Seán G. Roberts & Stephen C. Levinson - 2017 - Interaction Studies 18 (3):402-442.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29.  5
    Cultural Effects Rather Than a Bilingual Advantage in Cognition: A Review and an Empirical Study.Steven Samuel, Karen Roehr‐Brackin, Hyensou Pak & Hyunji Kim - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (7):2313-2341.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30.  6
    The Cultural Part of Cognition.R. DandRade - 1981 - Cognitive Science 5 (3):179-195.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  31.  13
    Mathematical Cognition and its Cultural Dimension.Andrea Bender, Sieghard Beller, Marc Brysbaert, Stanislas Dehaene & Heike Wiese - 2009 - In N. A. Taatgen & H. van Rijn (eds.), Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society.
  32.  14
    On Cognition and Cultural Evolution.Shinji Teraji - 2014 - Mind and Society 13 (2):167-182.
  33.  14
    Artifacts and Cognition: Evolution or Cultural Progress?Bruce Bridgeman - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (3):403-403.
    Lack of symmetry of stone tools does not require that hominids making asymmetric tools are incapable of doing better. By analogy, differences between stone tools of early humans and modern technology arose without genetic change. A conservative assumption is that symmetry of stone artifacts may have arisen simply because symmetrical tools work better when used for striking and chopping rather than scraping.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34.  2
    Singing in the Rain. Cultural Symbols and Cognition in the Aesthetics of Weather.Mădălina Diaconu - 2017 - In Anja Weiberg & Stefan Majetschak (eds.), Aesthetics Today: Contemporary Approaches to the Aesthetics of Nature and of Arts. Proceedings of the 39th International Wittgenstein Symposium in Kirchberg. De Gruyter. pp. 51-68.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35.  4
    Altarriba, J.(Ed.), Cognition and Culture: A Cross-Cultural Approach to Cognitive Psychology (= Advances in Psychology 103). Amsterdam: Elsevier Science Publishers, 1993. Alvesson, Mats and Per Olof Berg, Corporate Culture and Organizational Symbolism: An Overview (= de Gruyter Studies in Organization 34). New York: Walter de Gruyter, 1992. [REVIEW]Susan Bordo & Giovanna Borradori - 1994 - Semiotica 102 (3/4):345-348.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36. Human Cognition and Cultural Evolution.Pascal Boyer - 1999 - In Henrietta L. Moore (ed.), Anthropological Theory Today. Polity Press. pp. 206--33.
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37.  76
    Cultural Learning.Michael Tomasello, Ann Cale Kruger & Hilary Horn Ratner - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (3):495-511.
  38. The Ethics of Belief, Cognition, and Climate Change Pseudoskepticism: Implications for Public Discourse.Lawrence Torcello - 2016 - Topics in Cognitive Science 8 (1):19-48.
    The relationship between knowledge, belief, and ethics is an inaugural theme in philosophy; more recently, under the title “ethics of belief” philosophers have worked to develop the appropriate methodology for studying the nexus of epistemology, ethics, and psychology. The title “ethics of belief” comes from a 19th-century paper written by British philosopher and mathematician W.K. Clifford. Clifford argues that we are morally responsible for our beliefs because each belief that we form creates the cognitive circumstances for related beliefs to follow, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  39.  73
    Précis of Origins of the Modern Mind: Three Stages in the Evolution of Culture and Cognition.Merlin Donald - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (4):737-748.
    This bold and brilliant book asks the ultimate question of the life sciences: How did the human mind acquire its incomparable power? In seeking the answer, Merlin Donald traces the evolution of human culture and cognition from primitive apes to the era of artificial intelligence, and presents an original theory of how the human mind evolved from its presymbolic form. In the emergence of modern human culture, Donald proposes, there were three radical transitions. During the first, our bipedal but (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   110 citations  
  40.  4
    Cognitive Innovation, Cumulative Cultural Evolution, and Enculturation.Regina E. Fabry - 2017 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 17 (5):375-395.
    Cognitive innovation has shaped and transformed our cognitive capacities throughout history. Until recently, cognitive innovation has not received much attention by empirical and conceptual research in the cognitive sciences. This paper is a first attempt to help close this gap. It will be argued that cognitive innovation is best understood in connection with cumulative cultural evolution and enculturation. Cumulative cultural evolution plays a vital role for the inter-generational transmission of the products of cognitive innovation. Furthermore, there are at (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41.  49
    Interdisciplinary and Cross‐Cultural Perspectives on Explanatory Coexistence.Rachel E. Watson‐Jones, Justin T. A. Busch & Cristine H. Legare - 2015 - Topics in Cognitive Science 7 (4):611-623.
    Natural and supernatural explanations are used to interpret the same events in a number of predictable and universal ways. Yet little is known about how variation in diverse cultural ecologies influences how people integrate natural and supernatural explanations. Here, we examine explanatory coexistence in three existentially arousing domains of human thought: illness, death, and human origins using qualitative data from interviews conducted in Tanna, Vanuatu. Vanuatu, a Melanesian archipelago, provides a cultural context ideal for examining variation in explanatory (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  42.  17
    Context and Perceptual Salience Influence the Formation of Novel Stereotypes Via Cumulative Cultural Evolution.Jacqui Hutchison, Sheila J. Cunningham, Gillian Slessor, James Urquhart, Kenny Smith & Douglas Martin - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (S1):186-212.
    We use a transmission chain method to establish how context and category salience influence the formation of novel stereotypes through cumulative cultural evolution. We created novel alien targets by combining features from three category dimensions—color, movement, and shape—thereby creating social targets that were individually unique but that also shared category membership with other aliens. At the start of the transmission chains each alien was randomly assigned attributes that described it. Participants were given training on the alien-attribute assignments and were (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43. Primate Cognition.Amanda Seed & Michael Tomasello - 2010 - Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (3):407-419.
    As the cognitive revolution was slow to come to the study of animal behavior, the vast majority of what we know about primate cognition has been discovered in the last 30 years. Building on the recognition that the physical and social worlds of humans and their living primate relatives pose many of the same evolutionary challenges, programs of research have established that the most basic cognitive skills and mental representations that humans use to navigate those worlds are already possessed (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   134 citations  
  44. Cross-Cultural Similarities and Differences.William Forde Thompson & Balkwill & Laura-Lee - 2010 - In Patrik N. Juslin & John Sloboda (eds.), Handbook of Music and Emotion: Theory, Research, Applications. Oxford University Press.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45.  14
    Cultural Niche Construction and Human Learning Environments: Investigating Sociocultural Perspectives.Jeremy R. Kendal - 2011 - Biological Theory 6 (3):241-250.
  46. Variations in Judgments of Intentional Action and Moral Evaluation Across Eight Cultures.Erin Robbins, Jason Shepard & Philippe Rochat - 2017 - Cognition 164:22-30.
    Individuals tend to judge bad side effects as more intentional than good side effects (the Knobe or side- effect effect). Here, we assessed how widespread these findings are by testing eleven adult cohorts of eight highly contrasted cultures on their attributions of intentional action as well as ratings of blame and praise. We found limited generalizability of the original side-effect effect, and even a reversal of the effect in two rural, traditional cultures (Samoa and Vanuatu) where participants were more likely (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  47.  5
    Social Practice and Shared History, Not Social Scale, Structure Cross‐Cultural Complexity in Kinship Systems.Péter Rácz, Sam Passmore & Fiona M. Jordan - forthcoming - Topics in Cognitive Science.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. Cognition and Epistemic Reliability: Comments on Goldman.Gary Hatfield - 1986 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1987:312 - 318.
    The paper provisionally accepts the goal of Goldman's primary epistemics, which is to seek reliability values for basic cognitive processes, and questions whether such values may plausibly be expected. The reliability of such processes as perception and memory is dependent on other aspects of cognitive structure, and especially on one's "conceptual scheme," the evaluation of which goes beyond primary epistemics (and its dependence on cognitive science) to social epistemics, or indeed to traditional epistemology and philosophy of science. Two general arguments (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49.  9
    When Extremists Win: Cultural Transmission Via Iterated Learning When Populations Are Heterogeneous.Danielle J. Navarro, Amy Perfors, Arthur Kary, Scott D. Brown & Chris Donkin - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (7):2108-2149.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50. Cognitive Integration How Culture Transforms Us and Extends Our Cognitive Capabilities.Richard Menary - 2018 - In Shaun Gallagher, Albert Newen & Leon De Bruin (eds.), Oxford Handbook of 4E Cognition. Oxford: Oford University press. pp. 187-215.
    Cognitive integration is a contribution to the embodied, embedded, and extended cognition movement in philosophy and cognitive science and the extended synthesis movement in evolutionary biology— particularly cultural evolution and niche construction. It is a framework for understanding and studying cognition and the mind that draws on several sources: empirical research in embodied cognition, arguments for extended cognition, distributed cognition, niche construction and cultural inheritance, developmental psychology, social learning, and cognitive neuroscience. Its uniqueness (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 1000