Results for 'Cyborg'

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  1. Cyborg Intentionality: Rethinking the Phenomenology of Human–Technology Relations. [REVIEW]Peter-Paul Verbeek - 2008 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 7 (3):387-395.
    This article investigates the types of intentionality involved in human–technology relations. It aims to augment Don Ihde’s analysis of the relations between human beings and technological artifacts, by analyzing a number of concrete examples at the limits of Ihde’s analysis. The article distinguishes and analyzes three types of “cyborg intentionality,” which all involve specific blends of the human and the technological. Technologically mediated intentionality occurs when human intentionality takes place “through” technological artifacts; hybrid intentionality occurs when the technological actually (...)
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    Ethical Issues in Cyborg Technology: Diversity and Inclusion.Enno Park - 2014 - NanoEthics 8 (3):303-306.
    Progress has reached the point where cyborg technology is leaving the sphere of mere science fiction. Whereas society as a whole formed a symbiosis with technology long ago, individuals are now starting to merge with technology as well. The effects can already be studied by looking at the examples of smartphones, computers and the Internet. The idea of ‘repairing’ humans, medical implants more sensitive than our natural, human faculties and even non-medical implants raise a lot of ethical questions, and (...)
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  3. Cyborg Mothering.Shelley Park - 2010 - In Jocelyn Stitt & Pegeen Powell (eds.), Mothers Who Deliver: Feminist Interventions into Public and Interpersonal Discourse. SUNY Press. pp. 57-75.
    As new communication technologies transform everyday life in the 21st century, personal, family, and other social relations are transformed with it. As a way of exploring the larger question, "how exactly does communication technology transform love and how love is lived?" here I explore the cell phone, instant messaging and other communication technologies as electronic extensions of maternal bodies connecting (cyber)mother to (cyber)children. -/- Feminist explorations of the marketing and use of cell phones, as well as other communication technologies, have (...)
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  4.  84
    Aging: I Don't Want to Be a Cyborg[REVIEW]Don Ihde - 2008 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 7 (3):397-404.
    Examination is made of a range of cyborg solutions to bodily problems due to damage, but here with particular reference to aging. Both technological and animal implants, transplants and prosthetic devices are phenomenologically analyzed. The resultant trade-off phenomena are compared to popular culture technofantasies and desires and finally to human attitudes toward mortality and contingency. The parallelism of resistance to contingent existence and to becoming a cyborg is noted.
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  5.  46
    The Frozen Cyborg: A Reply to Selinger and Engström. [REVIEW]Andy Clark - 2008 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 7 (3):343-346.
    Selinger and Engstrom, A moratorium on cyborgs: Computation, cognition and commerce, 2008 (this issue) urge upon us a moratorium on ‘cyborg discourse’. But the argument underestimates the richness and complexity of our ongoing communal explorations. It leans on a somewhat outdated version of the machine metaphor (exemplified perhaps by a frozen 1970’s Cyborg). The modern cyborg, informed by an evolving computational model of mind, can play a positive role in the critical discussions that Selinger and Engstrom seek.
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  6.  66
    “We Can Rebuild Him!”: The Essentialisation of the Human/Cyborg Interface in the Twenty-First Century, or Whatever Happened to The Six Million Dollar Man? [REVIEW]Simon Bacon - 2013 - AI and Society 28 (3):267-276.
    This paper aims to show how recent cinematic representations reveal a far more pessimistic and essentialised vision of Human/Cyborg hybridity in comparison with the more enunciative and optimistic ones seen at the end of the twentieth century. Donna Haraway’s still influential 1985 essay “A Cyborg Manifesto” saw the combination of the organic and the technological as offering new and exciting ways beyond the normalised culturally constructed categories of gender and identity formation. However, more recently critics see her later (...)
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  7.  13
    Cyborg Bodies—Self-Reflections on Sensory Augmentations.Stefan Greiner - 2014 - NanoEthics 8 (3):299-302.
    Sensory augmentation challenges current societal norms and views of what is conceived as a “normal” human being. Beginning with self reflections of a bodyhacker, the author proposes an extended view onto the human or respectively cyborg body. Based on cognitive theories, it is argumented that we are already mental cyborgs. Our brains plastically restructure themselves in order to meet new requirements of the technological extended human.
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  8.  13
    Hacking the Body and Posthumanist Transbecoming: 10,000 Generations Later as the Mestizaje of Speculative Cyborg Feminism and Significant Otherness. [REVIEW]Lissette Olivares - 2014 - NanoEthics 8 (3):287-297.
    This essay gives a situated introduction to body hacking, an underground surgical process that seeks to transform the body’s architecture, offering an ethnographic account of the affects that drive this corporeal intervention for performance artist Cheto Castellano, and later, for the author. A brief history of recent body modification movements is offered. Through these situated stories of corporeal transformation there is an exploration of Eva Hayward’s concept of transbecoming, exploring the perpetual change of the body in transition, particularly in relation (...)
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  9.  2
    L’ipotesi della mente estesa: antropologia del cyborg naturale.Giulia Piredda - 2016 - Rivista Internazionale di Filosofia e Psicologia 7 (1):83-95.
    Riassunto : Tra le più recenti riflessioni sulla mente umana, il quadro teorico della “mente estesa” ci dipinge come dei cyborg naturali provvisti di menti “superdotate”, ottenute grazie alla capacità di sfruttare le risorse tecnologiche e ambientali in modo integrato a nostro vantaggio. In questo articolo si ripercorre la genesi teorica di questo modello a partire dalle critiche alla scienza cognitiva classica, basata sul modello delle computazioni su rappresentazioni, e in particolare all’individualismo metodologico. Successivamente, si analizza il principale argomento (...)
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  10.  7
    A Cyborg Ontology in Health Care: Traversing Into the Liminal Space Between Technology and Person-Centred Practice.Jennifer Lapum, Suzanne Fredericks, Heather Beanlands, Elizabeth McCay, Jasna Schwind & Daria Romaniuk - 2012 - Nursing Philosophy 13 (4):276-288.
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  11.  38
    The Cyborg as an Interpretation of Culture-Nature.Anne Kull - 2001 - Zygon 36 (1):49-56.
  12.  25
    A Cyborg's Testimonial: Mourning Blade Runner's Cryptic Images.R. Pope - 2008 - Film-Philosophy 12 (2):1-16.
    "I’ve seen things you people wouldn’t believe. Attack ships on fire off the shoulderof Orion. I watched c-beams glitter in the dark near the Tanhauser Gate. Allthose… moments will be lost… in time. Like… tears… in rain. Time… to die." . With these lines Roy testifies to his memories and to his death, a death that has, in a sense,already taken place, and one that is, by definition, prohibited. While one cannotexperience one’s own death, death is not strictly a limit (...)
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  13.  6
    Free Software and the Political Philosophy of the Cyborg World.S. Chopra & S. Dexter - 2007 - Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 37 (2):41-52.
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  14.  51
    Cyborg Morals, Cyborg Values, Cyborg Ethics.Kevin Warwick - 2003 - Ethics and Information Technology 5 (3):131-137.
    The era of the Cyborg is now upon us. This has enormous implications on ethical values for both humans and cyborgs. In this paper the state of play is discussed. Routes to cyborgisation are introduced and different types of Cyborg are considered. The author's own self-experimentation projects are described as central to the theme taken. The presentation involves ethical aspects of cyborgisation both as it stands now and those which need to be investigated in the near future as (...)
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  15.  22
    Who's Afraid of Stella Walsh? On Gender, 'Gene Cheaters', and the Promises of Cyborg Athletes.Kutte Jönsson - 2007 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 1 (2):239 – 262.
    In this article, I argue that there are moral reasons to embrace the construction of self-designing and sex/gender-neutral cyborg athletes. In fact, with the prospect of advanced genetic and cyborg technology, we may face a future where sport (as we know it) occurs in its purest form; that is, where athletes get evaluated by athletic performance only and not by their gender, and where it becomes impossible to discriminate athletes based on their body constitution and gender identity. The (...)
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  16.  27
    Donna Haraway's Cyborg Touching (Up/On) Luce Irigaray's Ethics and the Interval Between: Poethics as Embodied Writing.Margaret E. Toye - 2012 - Hypatia 27 (1):182-200.
    In this article, I argue that Donna Haraway's figure of the cyborg needs to be reassessed and extricated from the many misunderstandings that surround it. First, I suggest that we consider her cyborg as an ethical concept. I propose that her cyborg can be productively placed within the ethical framework developed by Luce Irigaray, especially in relationship to her concept of the “interval between.” Second, I consider how Haraway's “cyborg writing” can be understood as embodied ethical (...)
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  17.  6
    Race as Technology: From Posthuman Cyborg to Human Industry.Holly Jones & Nicholaos Jones - 2017 - Ilha Do Desterro 70 (2):39-51.
    Cyborg and prosthetic technologies frame prominent posthumanist approaches to understanding the nature of race. But these frameworks struggle to accommodate the phenomena of racial passing and racial travel, and their posthumanist orientation blurs useful distinctions between racialized humans and their social contexts. We advocate, instead, a humanist approach to race, understanding racial hierarchy as an industrial technology. Our approach accommodates racial passing and travel. It integrates a wide array of research across disciplines. It also helpfully distinguishes among grounds of (...)
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  18.  2
    The Cyborg Embryo.S. Franklin - 2006 - Theory, Culture and Society 23 (7-8):167-187.
    It is useful on the occasion of the 21st anniversary of the ‘Cyborg Manifesto’ not only to reconsider its lessons in the context of what is frequently described as the re-engineering of ‘life itself’, but to look at Haraway’s earlier work on embryos. In this article I begin with Haraway’s analysis of embryology in the 1970s to suggest her cyborg embryo was already there, and has, if anything, gained relevance in today’s embryo-strewn society. I argue further, as the (...)
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  19.  5
    Structure, Vital Form and the Cyborg.Dorothea Olkowski - 2016 - Chiasmi International 18:183-197.
    In his 1997 book, Being There: Putting Brain, Body and World Together Again, Andy Clark advocates ‘embodied, active cognition,’ to discuss the manner in which an autonomous, embodied agent interacts with its environment. The implication is that since our minds as well as our bodies are matter, and otherwise nothing special, it is inevitable that we humans are natural born cyborgs and the human-machine interface will before long become completely transparent to the point of being invisible. In his critique of (...)
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  20.  15
    Herbert A. Simon as a Cyborg Scientist.Esther-Mirjam Sent - 2000 - Perspectives on Science 8 (4):380-406.
    : This paper discusses how Herbert Simon's initial interest in decision making became transformed into a focus on understanding human problem solving in response to the concrete conditions of the Cold War and the practical goals of the military. In particular, it suggests a connection between the seachange in Simon's interest and his shift in patronage. As a result, Simon is portrayed as a component of the scientific-military World War II cyborg that further evolved during the Cold War. Moving (...)
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  21.  7
    Cyborg: A Design for Life in the Borderlands.Martin Wood - 1999 - Emergence: Complexity and Organization 1 (3):92-104.
    Traditional managers have insisted in a highly structured way of institutionalizing the mechanistic, functianalized, physical management of people and artifacts. This focus on structure creates a tension between the need for rigid command on the OM hand and that for flexible response to threats on the other. The modern worker i s thereby confronted with a bewildering multiplicity of partial identities, contradictory viewpoints and corporate strategies that pull in different directions. Wood suggests a contrasting approach, the cyborg self; a (...)
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  22.  4
    The Defining Components of the Cyborg: Cyborg-Athletes, Fictional or Real?Francisco Javier Lopez Frias - 2016 - Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 10 (1):97-111.
    In this paper, I engage in the debate on the definition of the cyborg. I identify the two defining components of the traditional definition of the cyborg: the symbiotic relationship between human nature and technology; and the embodiment of a superhuman or inhuman feature or ability. Then, I trace these two components in the scholarly debate on the cyborg. To conclude, I explore the role the scholarly view of the cyborg plays in the debate on (...)-athletes in the philosophy of sport. (shrink)
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  23. What Would Happen If a ‘Woman’ Outpaced the Winner of the Gold Medal in the ‘Men’s’ One Hundred Meters?: Female Sport, Drugs and the Transgressive Cyborg Body.Michael D. Burke - 2004 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 11 (1):35-43.
    The separation of men’s and women’s competitions in the sporting world has been suggested as a necessary protection for female athletes against the superior athletic performances of male athletes. The comparison of the most elite performers in these two categories maintains the historical pattern of viewing male sport and the male athlete as the standard, and female sport and the female athlete as the inferior ‘other’. This paper argues for a transformative utilization of the separation of men’s and women’s sports (...)
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  24. Beyond Cyborg Subjectivities: Becoming-Posthumanist Educational Researchers.Annette Gough & Noel Gough - 2016 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 49 (11):1112-1124.
    This excerpt from our collective biography emerges from a dialogue that commenced when Noel interjected the concept of ‘becoming-cyborg’ into our conversations about Annette’s experiences of breast cancer, which initially prompted her to interpret her experiences as a ‘chaos narrative’ of cyborgian and environmental embodiment in education contexts. The materialisation of Donna Haraway’s figuration of the cyborg in Annette’s changing body enabled new appreciations of its interpretive power, and functioned in some ways as a successor project to Noel’s (...)
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  25.  32
    The Gendered Cyborg: A Reader.Gill Kirkup (ed.) - 2000 - Routledge in Association with the Open University.
    The Gendered Cyborg brings together material from a variety of disciplines that analyze the relationship between gender and technoscience, and the way that this relationship is represented through ideas, language and visual imagery. The book opens with key feminist articles from the history and philosophy of science. They look at the ways that modern scientific thinking has constructed oppositional dualities such as objectivity/subjectivity, human/machine, nature/science, and male/female, and how these have constrained who can engage in science/technology and how they (...)
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  26. Machine Dreams: Economics Becomes a Cyborg Science.Philip Mirowski - 2001 - Cambridge University Press.
    This was the first cross-over book into the history of science written by an historian of economics. It shows how 'history of technology' can be integrated with the history of economic ideas. The analysis combines Cold War history with the history of postwar economics in America and later elsewhere, revealing that the Pax Americana had much to do with abstruse and formal doctrines such as linear programming and game theory. It links the literature on 'cyborg' to economics, an element (...)
     
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  27. " I Would Rather Be a Cyborg Than a Goddess": Becoming-Intersectional in Assemblage Theory.Jasbir K. Puar - 2012 - Philosophia: A Journal of Feminist Continental Philosophy 2 (1):49-66.
  28.  37
    Cyborg History and the World War II Regime.Andrew Pickering - 1995 - Perspectives on Science 3 (1):1-48.
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  29. Speaking Cyborg: Technoculture and Technonature.Anne Kull - 2002 - Zygon 37 (2):279-288.
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  30.  16
    RhizomANTically Becoming-Cyborg: Performing Posthuman Pedagogies.Noel Gough - 2004 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 36 (3):253–265.
  31. Cyborg Life: The In-Between of Humans and Machines.Glen Mazis - 2008 - PhaenEx 3 (2):14-36.
    Cyborgs are ongoing becomings of a doubly “in-between” temporality of humans and machines. Materially made from components of both sorts of beings, cyborgs gain increasing function through an interweaving in which each alters the other, from the level of “neural plasticity” to software updates to emotional breakthroughs of which both are a part. One sort of temporal in-between is of the progressive unfolding of a deepening becoming as “not-one-not-two” and the other is a “doubling back” of time into itself in (...)
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  32. Metal and Flesh, And: Cyborg: Digital Destiny and Human Possibility in the Age of the Wearable Computer (Review).Derrick de Kerckhove - 2003 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 46 (3):454-456.
  33.  13
    Be Very Afraid: Cyborg Athletes, Transhuman Ideals & Posthumanity.Andy Miah - 2003 - Journal of Evolution and Technology 13 (2).
  34.  10
    Cyborg and Ecofeminist Interventions: Challenges for an Environmental Feminism.Stacy Alaimo - 1994 - Feminist Studies 20 (1):133.
  35.  26
    The Natural Cyborg: The Stakes of Bergson's Philosophy of Evolution.Paola Marrati - 2010 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 48 (s1):3-17.
    Bergson's engagement with evolutionary theory was remarkably up to date with the science of his time. One century later, the scientific and social landscape is undoubtedly quite different, but some of his insights remain of critical importance for the present. This paper aims at discussing three related aspects of Bergson's philosophy of evolution and their relevance for contemporary debates: first, the stark distinction between the affirmation of the reality of change and becoming, on the one hand, and any notion of (...)
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  36.  7
    From Cyborg to Cyberpunk-The Art of Living in the Cyberage.A. T. Nuyen - unknown
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  37.  20
    Cyber Citizen or Cyborg Citizen: Baudrillard, Political Agency, and the Commons in Virtual Politics.Andrew Koch - 2005 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 20 (2):159-175.
    The ethical commitment to democracy requires creating the public space for a rational discourse among real alternatives by the population. In this article, I argue that the Internet fails in this task on 2 fronts. Inspired by the work of Jean Baudrillard, the work argues that the Internet reinforces a structure of passive political agents through its 1-way form of communication. The Internet is designed to deliver political text, not engage the public in dialogue about the direction of collective decision (...)
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  38.  2
    El cyborg como dispositivo de resistencia al biopoder en Impuesto a la carne y Fuerzas especiales de Diamela Eltit.Yasna Elizabeth Burich Oyarzún - 2017 - Logos: Revista de Lingüística, Filosofía y Literatura 27 (1):90-104.
    En este artículo se analiza la construcción de los cuerpos de los personajes protagónicos femeninos de las novelas Impuesto a la carne y Fuerzas especiales de Diamela Eltit. Se sostiene que estos cuerpos son cyborgs que se generan gracias a articulaciones inmanentes con las tecnologías biomédicas, informáticas, escriturales, lo humano y el biopoder. El artículo se centra en la descripción de las estrategias de resistencia germinales desarrolladas por estos cuerpos cyborgs, las que se sustentan en las promesas de creación y (...)
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  39.  14
    Cyborg Bonding: 3D Fetal Ultrasound as a Technology of Communication and the Rise of "Boutique" Ultrasound.Elizabeth Fraser - 2016 - Ijfab: International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 9 (1):68-80.
    In “Body, Cyborgs and the Politics of Incarnation,” Bruno Latour recounts the story of Professor Paul Churchland, his colleague, carrying a portrait of his wife. “Nothing unusual in this,” Latour writes. “No, except that this picture was an image produced by computed tomography, a CT scan of his wife’s inner brain, in full colour”. The image of Professor Church-land proudly showing off a full-color CT of his wife’s beautiful brain has a wonderful sense of absurdity to it, and its punch (...)
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  40. Garry Kasparov is a Cyborg, or What ChessBase Teaches Us About Technology.J. Hartmann - 2008 - In Benjamin Hale (ed.), Philosophy Looks at Chess. Open Court Press. pp. 39--64.
     
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  41.  10
    The Capsule as Cyborg Bioarchitecture.Zenovia Toloudi - 2016 - Technoetic Arts 14 (1):95-104.
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  42.  49
    Cyborg: Myth or Reality?Henk G. Geertsema - 2006 - Zygon 41 (2):289-328.
  43.  9
    The Evolution of Cyborg Consciousness.Charles D. Laughlin - 1997 - Anthropology of Consciousness 8 (4):144-159.
  44.  1
    Machine Dreams: Economics Becomes a Cyborg Science. [REVIEW]Roger Backhouse - 2003 - Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 94:769-771.
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  45. Philip Mirowski.Machine Dreams: Economics Becomes a Cyborg Science. Vii+648 Pp., Tables, Refs., Index. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2002. $35. [REVIEW]Roger E. Backhouse - 2003 - Isis 94 (4):769-771.
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  46.  21
    Der Cyborg und die Frage nach dem Menschen. Kritische Überlegungen zum „homo arte emendatus et correctus“.Jan-Christoph Heilinger & Oliver Müller - 2007 - Jahrbuch für Wissenschaft Und Ethik 12 (1):21-44.
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  47.  5
    The Ethics and Politics of Cyborg Embodiment: Citizenship as a Hypervalue.Chris Hables Gray - 1997 - Cultural Values 1 (2):252-258.
  48. Chris Hables Gray, Ed. The Cyborg Handbook.J. Armitage - forthcoming - Radical Philosophy.
     
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  49.  16
    The Philosophical Roots of Donna Haraway’s Cyborg Imagery: Descartes and Heidegger Through Latour, Derrida, and Agamben.Gavin Rae - 2014 - Human Studies 37 (4):505-528.
    The purpose of this paper is to highlight some of the main philosophical roots of Donna Haraway’s thinking, an issue she rarely discusses and which is frequently ignored in the literature, but which will allow us to not only better understand her thinking, but also locate it within the philosophical tradition. In particular, it suggests that Haraway’s thinking emanates from a Cartesian and Heideggerian heritage whereby it, implicitly, emanates from Heidegger’s destruction of metaphysical anthropocentrism to critique the divisions between human, (...)
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    Hot to Bot: Pygmalion's Lust, the Maharal's Fear, and the Cyborg Future of Art.Edward A. Shanken - 2005 - Technoetic Arts 3 (1):43-55.
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