14 found
Order:
  1.  68
    Autonomy and Coercion in Academic “Cognitive Enhancement” Using Methylphenidate: Perspectives of Key Stakeholders. [REVIEW]Cynthia Forlini & Eric Racine - 2009 - Neuroethics 2 (3):163-177.
    There is mounting evidence that methylphenidate (MPH; Ritalin) is being used by healthy college students to improve concentration, alertness, and academic performance. One of the key concerns associated with such use of pharmaceuticals is the degree of freedom individuals have to engage in or abstain from cognitive enhancement (CE). From a pragmatic perspective, careful examination of the ethics of acts and contexts in which they arise includes considering coercion and social pressures to enhance cognition. We were interested in understanding how (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   18 citations  
  2. Cognitive Enhancement, Lifestyle Choice or Misuse of Prescription Drugs?Eric Racine & Cynthia Forlini - 2010 - Neuroethics 3 (1):1-4.
    The prospects of enhancing cognitive or motor functions using neuroscience in otherwise healthy individuals has attracted considerable attention and interest in neuroethics (Farah et al., Nature Reviews Neuroscience 5:421–425, 2004; Glannon Journal of Medical Ethics 32:74–78, 2006). The use of stimulants is one of the areas which has propelled the discussion on the potential for neuroscience to yield cognition-enhancing products. However, we have found in our review of the literature that the paradigms used to discuss the non-medical use of stimulant (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   12 citations  
  3.  23
    Disagreements with Implications: Diverging Discourses on the Ethics of Non-Medical Use of Methylphenidate for Performance Enhancement.Cynthia Forlini & Eric Racine - 2009 - BMC Medical Ethics 10 (1):9.
    There is substantial evidence that methylphenidate (MPH; Ritalin), is being used by healthy university students for non-medical motives such as the improvement of concentration, alertness, and academic performance. The scope and potential consequences of the non-medical use of MPH upon healthcare and society bring about many points of view.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  4.  1
    How Research on Stakeholder Perspectives Can Inform Policy on Cognitive Enhancement.Cynthia Forlini, Eric Racine, Jochen Vollmann & Jan Schildmann - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (7):41 - 43.
  5. The Value and Pitfalls of Speculation About Science and Technology in Bioethics: The Case of Cognitive Enhancement.Eric Racine, Tristana Martin Rubio, Jennifer Chandler, Cynthia Forlini & Jayne Lucke - 2014 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 17 (3):325-337.
  6.  4
    A Prospectus for Ethical Analysis of Ageing Individuals' Responsibility to Prevent Cognitive Decline.Cynthia Forlini & Wayne Hall - 2017 - Bioethics 31 (9):657-665.
    As the world's population ages, governments and non-governmental organizations in developed countries are promoting healthy cognitive ageing to reduce the rate of age-related cognitive decline and sustain economic productivity in an ageing workforce. Recommendations from the Productivity Commission, Dementia Australia, Government Office for Science, Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues, Institute of Medicine, among others, are encouraging older adults to engage in mental, physical, and social activities. These lifestyle recommendations for healthy cognitive ageing are timely and well supported (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  8
    Knowledge, Experiences and Views of German University Students Toward Neuroenhancement: An Empirical-Ethical Analysis.Cynthia Forlini, Jan Schildmann, Patrik Roser, Radim Beranek & Jochen Vollmann - 2015 - Neuroethics 8 (2):83-92.
    Across normative and empirical disciplines, considerable attention has been devoted to the prevalence and ethics of the non-medical use of prescription and illegal stimulants for neuroenhancement among students. A predominant assumption is that neuroenhancement is prevalent, in demand, and calls for appropriate policy action. In this paper, we present data on the prevalence, views and knowledge from a large sample of German students in three different universities and analyze the findings from a moral pragmatics perspective. The results of our study (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  8.  26
    Considering the Causes and Implications of Ambivalence in Using Medicine for Enhancement.Cynthia Forlini & Eric Racine - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (1):15 - 17.
  9.  14
    Response.Cynthia Forlini & Eric Racine - 2010 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 7 (4):383-384.
    Response Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s11673-010-9255-1 Authors Cynthia Forlini, Neuroethics Research Unit, Institut de recherches cliniques de Montréal, 110, ave des Pins Ouest, Montréal, QC Canada H2W 1R7 Eric Racine, Neuroethics Research Unit, Institut de recherches cliniques de Montréal, 110, ave des Pins Ouest, Montréal, QC Canada H2W 1R7 Journal Journal of Bioethical Inquiry Online ISSN 1872-4353 Print ISSN 1176-7529 Journal Volume Volume 7 Journal Issue Volume 7, Number 4.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  10.  2
    Contextualized Autonomy and Liberalism: Broadening the Lenses on Complementary and Alternative Medicines in Preclinical Alzheimer's Disease.Eric Racine, John Aspler, Cynthia Forlini & Jennifer A. Chandler - 2017 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 27 (1):1-41.
    Concerns about the possibility of a sharp rise in the prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease in Western nations have led to both the significant deployment of resources and the development of national research and healthcare plans. Although often focused on treatment, substantial efforts have also been dedicated toward preventing or delaying AD onset. As a result, recent technological and biomedical advances have greatly improved the understanding of AD pathophysiology. While some new tests can assess only risk ), some tests for certain (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  13
    Generating Genius: How an Alzheimer's Drug Became Considered a 'Cognitive Enhancer' for Healthy Individuals.Lucie Wade, Cynthia Forlini & Eric Racine - 2014 - BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):37.
    Donepezil, an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor used in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, has been widely cited in media and bioethics literature on cognitive enhancement (CE) as having the potential to improve the cognitive ability of healthy individuals. In both literatures, this claim has been repeatedly supported by the results of a small study published by Yesavage et al. in 2002 on non-demented pilots (30-70 years old). The factors contributing to this specific interpretation of this study's results are unclear.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  2
    The is and Ought of the Ethics of Neuroenhancement: Mind the Gap.Cynthia Forlini & Wayne Hall - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  2
    Ethical, Social and Clinical Challenges in using Deep Brain Stimulation to Treat Addiction and Other Impulsive and Compulsive Disorders.Adrian Carter, Philip Mosley, Cynthia Forlini & Wayne Hall - 2015 - Jahrbuch für Wissenschaft Und Ethik 19 (1).
    Name der Zeitschrift: Jahrbuch für Wissenschaft und Ethik Jahrgang: 19 Heft: 1 Seiten: 163-188.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. Australian University Students’ Coping Strategies and Use of Pharmaceutical Stimulants as Cognitive Enhancers.Charmaine Jensen, Cynthia Forlini, Brad Partridge & Wayne Hall - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography