Results for 'Cynthia Fuchs Epstein'

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  1. The Contributions of Robert K. Merton to Culture Theory.Cynthia Fuchs Epstein - 2010 - In Craig J. Calhoun (ed.), Robert K. Merton: Sociology of Science and Sociology as Science. Columbia University Press.
     
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  2.  16
    The Effect of Level of Depth Processing and Degree of Informational Discrepancy on Adaptation to Uniocular Image Magnification.William Epstein & Cynthia A. Morgan-Paap - 1974 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 102 (4):585.
  3.  6
    Workplace Boundaries: Conceptions and Creations.Cynthia Epstein - 1989 - Social Research 56.
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  4. Taxation in a Lockean World*: RICHARD A. EPSTEIN.Richard A. Epstein - 1986 - Social Philosophy and Policy 4 (1):49-74.
    'Tis true governments cannot be supported without great charge, and it is fit everyone who enjoys a share of the protection should pay out of his estate his proportion for the maintenance of it. But still it must be with his own consent, i.e., the consent of the majority giving it either by themselves or their representatives chosen by them. For if any one shall claim a power to lay and levy taxes on the people, by his own authority, and (...)
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  5.  75
    Should Antidiscrimination Laws Limit Freedom of Association? The Dangerous Allure of Human Rights Legislation: Richard A. Epstein.Richard A. Epstein - 2008 - Social Philosophy and Policy 25 (2):123-156.
    This article defends the classical liberal view of human interactions that gives strong protection to associational freedom except in cases that involve the use of force or fraud or the exercise of monopoly power. That conception is at war with the modern antidiscrimination or human rights laws that operate in competitive markets in such vital areas as employment and housing, with respect to matters of race, sex, age, and increasingly, disability. The article further argues that using the “human rights” label (...)
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  6.  24
    Two Conceptions of Civil Rights*: RICHARD A. EPSTEIN.Richard A. Epstein - 1991 - Social Philosophy and Policy 8 (2):38-59.
    I. What Vintage of Civil Rights? In this paper I wish to compare and contrast two separate conceptions of civil rights and to argue that the older, more libertarian conception of the subject is preferable to the more widely accepted version used in the modern civil rights movement. The first conception of civil rights focuses on the question of individual capacity. The antithesis of a person with civil rights is the slave. But even if individuals are declared free, they are (...)
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  7.  43
    On the Optimal Mix of Private and Common Property*: RICHARD A. EPSTEIN.Richard A. Epstein - 1994 - Social Philosophy and Policy 11 (2):17-41.
    A broad range of intellectual perspectives may be brought to bear on any important social institution. To this general rule, the institution of private property is no exception. The desirability of private property has been endlessly debated across the disciplines: philosophical, historical, economic, and legal. Yet there is very little consensus over its proper social role and limitations. Is it possible to find a unique solution to questions of property and private ownership, good for all resources and for all times? (...)
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  8.  15
    Luck*: Richard A. Epstein.Richard A. Epstein - 1988 - Social Philosophy and Policy 6 (1):17-38.
    John Donne's song was hardly written in the tradition of political philosophy, but it has a good deal to say about the theme of luck, both good and bad, which I want to address. There is no doubt but that bad luck has bad consequences for the persons who suffer from it. If there were a costless way in which the consequences of bad luck could be spread across everyone in society at large, without increasing the risk of its occurrence, (...)
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  9.  44
    Can We Design an Optimal Constitution? Of Structural Ambiguity and Rights Clarity: Richard A. Epstein.Richard A. Epstein - 2011 - Social Philosophy and Policy 28 (1):290-324.
    The design of new constitutions is fraught with challenges on both issues of structural design and individual rights. As both a descriptive and normative matter it is exceedingly difficult to believe that one structural solution will fit all cases. The high variation in nation size, economic development, and ethnic division can easily tilt the balance for or against a Presidential or Parliamentary system, and even within these two broad classes the differences in constitutional structure are both large and hard to (...)
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  10.  35
    Deconstructing Privacy: And Putting It Back Together Again*: RICHARD A. EPSTEIN.Richard A. Epstein - 2000 - Social Philosophy and Policy 17 (2):1-24.
    It is a common conceit of academic writing to insist that progress in some given area of law or political theory is hampered by hopeless confusion over the meaning of certain standard terms. My usual attitude toward such claims is one of passionate rejection. Because the English language has served us well for such a long period of time, I bring a strong presumption of distrust to any claim of the conceptual poverty of ordinary language. The persistent fears of lack (...)
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  11.  30
    Imitations of Libertarian Thought*: RICHARD A. EPSTEIN.Richard A. Epstein - 1998 - Social Philosophy and Policy 15 (2):412-436.
    Imitation is said to be the sincerest form of flattery. Socially, the proposition may well be true. But in the world of ideas it is false: to the extent that two incompatible traditions use the same words or symbols to articulate different visions of legal or social organization, imitation begets confusion, not enlightenment. The effects of that confusion, moreover, are not confined to the world of ideas, but spill over into the world of politics and public affairs. Words are more (...)
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  12.  26
    The Problem of Forfeiture in the Welfare State: RICHARD A. EPSTEIN.Richard A. Epstein - 1997 - Social Philosophy and Policy 14 (2):256-284.
    Political theory has a good deal to say both for and against the establishment of the modern welfare state. As one might expect, most of that discussion is directed toward the expanded set of basic rights that the state confers on its members. In its most canonical form, the welfare state represents a switch in vision from the regime of negative rights in the nineteenth century to the regime of positive rights so much in vogue today. Negative rights—an inexact and (...)
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  13.  19
    The Varieties of Self-Interest*: RICHARD A. EPSTEIN.Richard A. Epstein - 1990 - Social Philosophy and Policy 8 (1):102-120.
    In this paper, I want to explore the relationship between the various forms of individual self-interest and the appropriate structures of government. I shall begin with the former, and by degrees extend the analysis to the latter. I do so in order to mount a defense of principles of limited government, private property, and individual liberty. The ordinary analysis of self-interest treats it as though it were not only a given but also a constant of human nature, and thus makes (...)
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  14.  4
    ASH, CJ, Categoricity in Hyperarithmetical Degrees (1) BALDWIN, JT and HARRINGTON, L., Trivial Pursuit: Re-Marks on the Main Gap (3) COOPER, SB and EPSTEIN, RL, Complementing Below Re-Cursively Enumerable Degrees (1). [REVIEW]Rl Epstein - 1987 - Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 34 (1):311.
  15.  22
    The Professional Quest for Truth by Stephan Fuchs.Stephan Fuchs - 1994 - Social Epistemology 8 (1):81 – 88.
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  16. Edwin M. Epstein.Spring Epstein - 1987 - The Corporate Social Policy Process: Beyond Business Ethics, Corporate Social Responsibility, and Corporate Social Responsiveness, California Management Review 29:99-114.
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  17. Health Care on Main Street-Laura Weiss Roberts, John Battaglia, Margaret Smithpeter, and Richard S. Epstein Reply.L. W. Roberts, J. Battaglia, M. Smithpeter & R. S. Epstein - 2000 - Hastings Center Report 30 (3):5-6.
     
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  18. The Ant Trap: Rebuilding the Foundations of the Social Sciences.Brian Epstein - 2015 - Oxford University Press.
    We live in a world of crowds and corporations, artworks and artifacts, legislatures and languages, money and markets. These are all social objects — they are made, at least in part, by people and by communities. But what exactly are these things? How are they made, and what is the role of people in making them? In The Ant Trap, Brian Epstein rewrites our understanding of the nature of the social world and the foundations of the social sciences. (...) explains and challenges the three prevailing traditions about how the social world is made. One tradition takes the social world to be built out of people, much as traffic is built out of cars. A second tradition also takes people to be the building blocks of the social world, but focuses on thoughts and attitudes we have toward one another. And a third tradition takes the social world to be a collective projection onto the physical world. Epstein shows that these share critical flaws. Most fundamentally, all three traditions overestimate the role of people in building the social world: they are overly anthropocentric. Epstein starts from scratch, bringing the resources of contemporary metaphysics to bear. In the place of traditional theories, he introduces a model based on a new distinction between the grounds and the anchors of social facts. Epstein illustrates the model with a study of the nature of law, and shows how to interpret the prevailing traditions about the social world. Then he turns to social groups, and to what it means for a group to take an action or have an intention. Contrary to the overwhelming consensus, these often depend on more than the actions and intentions of group members. (shrink)
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  19. The SAGE Handbook of the Philosophy of Social Sciences, Edited by Ian Jarvie and Jesús Zamora-Bonilla. SAGE Publications, 2011, Xvii + 749 Pages. [REVIEW]Brian Epstein - 2012 - Economics and Philosophy 28 (3):428-435.
  20.  9
    .Mikhail Epstein - 2010 - Common Knowledge 16 (3):367-403.
    In this guest column, Epstein offers “a new sign” that, he argues, resolves difficulties that have arisen in many theories and practices, including linguistics, semiotics, literary theory, poetics, aesthetics, ecology, ecophilology, eco-ethics, metaphysics, theology, psychology, and phenomenology. The new sign, a pair of quotation marks around a blank space, signfies the absence of any sign. Most generally, “ ” relates to the blank space that surrounds and underlies a text; by locating “ ” within the text, the margins are (...)
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  21. The Intelligence of a Machine.Jean Epstein - 2014 - Univocal Publishing.
    The advent of the cinema radically altered our comprehension of time, space, and reality. With his experience as a pioneering avant-garde filmmaker, Jean Epstein uses the universes created by the cinematograph to deconstruct our understanding of how time and space, reality and unreality, continuity and discontinuity, determinism and randomness function both inside and outside the cinema. Time, he says, should be regarded as the first, not the fourth, dimension—and the cinematograph allows us, for the first time, to manipulate it (...)
     
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  22. Envy: The Seven Deadly Sins.Joseph Epstein - 2003 - Oxford University Press.
    Malice that cannot speak its name, cold-blooded but secret hostility, impotent desire, hidden rancor and spite--all cluster at the center of envy. Envy clouds thought, writes Joseph Epstein, clobbers generosity, precludes any hope of serenity, and ends in shriveling the heart. Of the seven deadly sins, he concludes, only envy is no fun at all. Writing in a conversational, erudite, self-deprecating style that wears its learning lightly, Epstein takes us on a stimulating tour of the many faces of (...)
     
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  23.  91
    Properties of QBist State Spaces.D. M. Appleby, Åsa Ericsson & Christopher A. Fuchs - 2011 - Foundations of Physics 41 (3):564-579.
    Every quantum state can be represented as a probability distribution over the outcomes of an informationally complete measurement. But not all probability distributions correspond to quantum states. Quantum state space may thus be thought of as a restricted subset of all potentially available probabilities. A recent publication (Fuchs and Schack, arXiv:0906.2187v1, 2009) advocates such a representation using symmetric informationally complete (SIC) measurements. Building upon this work we study how this subset—quantum-state space—might be characterized. Our leading characteristic is that the (...)
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  24.  50
    Λ -Structures and s -Structures: Translating the Iteration Strategies.Gunter Fuchs - 2011 - Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 162 (9):710-751.
    Continuing the work of Fuchs [1], I show that the translation functions developed previously map iterable λ-structures to iterable s-structures and vice versa. To this end, I analyse how the translation functions interact with the formation of extender ultrapowers and normal iterations. This analysis makes it possible to translate iterations, and, in a last step, iteration strategies, thus arriving at the result.
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  25.  11
    Epilogue: Advances and Open Questions.Gary Hatfield & William Epstein - 2012 - In Gary Hatfield & Sarah Allred (eds.), Visual Experience: Sensation, Cognition, and Constancy. Oxford University Press. pp. 232-241.
    The term “perceptual constancy” was used by the Gestalt theorists in the early part of the twentieth century (e.g., Koffka 1935, 34, 90) to refer to the tendency of perception to remain invariant over changes of viewing distance, viewing angle, and conditions of illumination. This tendency toward constancy is remarkable: every change in the viewing distance, position, and illumination is necessarily accompanied by a change in the local proximal (retinal) stimulation, and yet perception remains relatively stable. The tendency toward perceptual (...)
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  26.  11
    Functional Equivalence of Masking and Cue Reduction in Perception of Shape at a Slant.William Epstein & Gary Hatfield - 1978 - Perception and Psychophysics 23 (2):137-144.
    In a backward masking paradigm Epstein, Hatfield, and Muise (1977) found that presentation of a frontoparallel pattern mask caused the perceived shape of elliptical figures which were rotated in depth to conform to a projective shape function. The current study extended the masking function by examining the effect of a mask which was partially or wholly cotemporal with the target. The study also assessed the functional equivalence of the masking treatment and the conventional treatment for minimizing depth information. Reports (...)
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  27.  70
    Anne O’Byrne: Natality and Finitude: Indiana University Press, Bloomington, 2010, 218 Pp, ISBN: 978-0-253-35531-7, $65.00 , ISBN: 978-0-253-22241-1, $22.95. [REVIEW]Jeffrey Epstein - 2012 - Continental Philosophy Review 45 (1):153-159.
    Anne O’Byrne: Natality and finitude Content Type Journal Article Category Book Review Pages 1-7 DOI 10.1007/s11007-011-9203-8 Authors Jeffrey Epstein, SUNY Stony Brook, 213 Harriman Hall, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3750, USA Journal Continental Philosophy Review Online ISSN 1573-1103 Print ISSN 1387-2842.
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  28.  55
    Universal Grammar: Hypothesis Space or Grammar Selection Procedures? Is UG Affected by Critical Periods?Gita Martohardjono, Samuel David Epstein & Suzanne Flynn - 1998 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (4):612-614.
    Universal Grammar (UG) can be interpreted as a constraint on the form of possible grammars (hypothesis space) or as a constraint on acquisition strategies (selection procedures). In this response to Herschensohn we reiterate the position outlined in Epstein et al. (1996a, r), that in the evaluation of L2 acquisition as a UG- constrained process the former (possible grammars/ knowledge states) is critical, not the latter. Selection procedures, on the other hand, are important in that they may have a bearing (...)
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  29.  42
    Personal Responsibility and Christian Morality.Josef Fuchs - 1983 - Gill & Macmillan.
    In this volume, Fr. Fuchs has brought together 12 exceptionally important essays which consider various aspects of the relationship between Christian morality ...
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  30.  11
    Elaboration d'une base de données d'exemples de structures comparatives : de la grille d'annotation au système d'interrogation.Frédérique Melanie-Becquet & Catherine Fuchs - 2011 - Corpus (Laboratoire Language) 10:273-295.
    Le présent article retrace les étapes qui ont présidé à l’élaboration d’une base de données d’exemples de structures à subordonnées comparatives du français. Ce travail a été réalisé dans le cadre du projet « Structures à Subordonnées Comparatives du français » (SCF). Piloté par le laboratoire LaTTiCe sous la direction de C. Fuchs, ce projet a réuni des membres de quatre laboratoires français : B. Combettes et A. Kuyumcuyan (ATILF, Nancy), C. Guimier (CRISCO, Caen), N. Fournier et M. Morinièr..
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  31.  7
    No Title Available: Reviews.Brian Epstein - 2012 - Economics and Philosophy 28 (3):428-435.
    Book Reviews Brian Epstein, Economics and Philosophy, FirstView Article.
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  32. A Philosophy of the Possible: Modalities in Thought and Culture.Mikhail Epstein - 2019 - Brill | Rodopi.
    In this book, Mikhail Epstein offers a systematic theory of modalities and their impact on the philosophy and culture of modernity and postmodernity, focusing on the creative potentials of possibilistic thinking for the humanities.
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  33. Enactive Intersubjectivity: Participatory Sense-Making and Mutual Incorporation.Thomas Fuchs & Hanne De Jaegher - 2009 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 8 (4):465-486.
    Current theories of social cognition are mainly based on a representationalist view. Moreover, they focus on a rather sophisticated and limited aspect of understanding others, i.e. on how we predict and explain others’ behaviours through representing their mental states. Research into the ‘social brain’ has also favoured a third-person paradigm of social cognition as a passive observation of others’ behaviour, attributing it to an inferential, simulative or projective process in the individual brain. In this paper, we present a concept of (...)
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  34. Temporality and Psychopathology.Thomas Fuchs - 2013 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (1):75-104.
    The paper first introduces the concept of implicit and explicit temporality, referring to time as pre-reflectively lived vs. consciously experienced. Implicit time is based on the constitutive synthesis of inner time consciousness on the one hand, and on the conative–affective dynamics of life on the other hand. Explicit time results from an interruption or negation of implicit time and unfolds itself in the dimensions of present, past and future. It is further shown that temporality, embodiment and intersubjectivity are closely connected: (...)
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  35. Integration of the Cognitive and the Psychodynamic Unconscious.S. Epstein - 1994 - American Psychologist 49 (8):409-24.
  36. Corporealized and Disembodied Minds: A Phenomenological View of the Body in Melancholia and Schizophrenia.Thomas Fuchs - 2005 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 12 (2):95-107.
  37. The Neural-Cognitive Basis of the Jamesian Stream of Thought.Russell Epstein - 2000 - Consciousness and Cognition 9 (4):550-575.
    William James described the stream of thought as having two components: (1) a nucleus of highly conscious, often perceptual material; and (2) a fringe of dimly felt contextual information that controls the entry of information into the nucleus and guides the progression of internally directed thought. Here I examine the neural and cognitive correlates of this phenomenology. A survey of the cognitive neuroscience literature suggests that the nucleus corresponds to a dynamic global buffer formed by interactions between different regions of (...)
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  38. Ontological Individualism Reconsidered.Brian Epstein - 2009 - Synthese 166 (1):187-213.
    The thesis of methodological individualism in social science is commonly divided into two different claims—explanatory individualism and ontological individualism. Ontological individualism is the thesis that facts about individuals exhaustively determine social facts. Initially taken to be a claim about the identity of groups with sets of individuals or their properties, ontological individualism has more recently been understood as a global supervenience claim. While explanatory individualism has remained controversial, ontological individualism thus understood is almost universally accepted. In this paper I argue (...)
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  39. Subjective Probability and Quantum Certainty.Carlton M. Caves, Christopher A. Fuchs & Rüdiger Schack - 2007 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 38 (2):255-274.
  40.  36
    Religion and Business – the Critical Role of Religious Traditions in Management Education.Edwin M. Epstein - 2002 - Journal of Business Ethics 38 (1-2):91 - 96.
    During the past decade many individuals have sought to create a connection between their work persona and their religious/spiritual persona. Management education has a legitimate role to play in introducing teachings drawn from our religious traditions into business ethics and other courses. Thereby, we can help prepare students to consider the possibility that business endeavors, spirituality and religious commitment can be inextricable parts of a coherent life.
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  41. The Phenomenology of Shame, Guilt and the Body in Body Dysmorphic Disorder and Depression.Thomas Fuchs - 2002 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 33 (2):223-243.
    From a phenomenological viewpoint, shame and guilt may be regarded as emotions which have incorporated the gaze and the voice of the other, respectively. The spontaneous and unreflected performance of the primordial bodily self has suffered a rupture: In shame or guilt we are rejected, separated from the others, and thrown back on ourselves. This reflective turn of spontaneous experience is connected with an alienation of primordial bodiliness that may be described as a "corporealization": The lived-body is changed into the (...)
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  42. Gestalt Psychology and the Philosophy of Mind.William Epstein & Gary Hatfield - 1994 - Philosophical Psychology 7 (2):163-181.
    The Gestalt psychologists adopted a set of positions on mind-body issues that seem like an odd mix. They sought to combine a version of naturalism and physiological reductionism with an insistence on the reality of the phenomenal and the attribution of meanings to objects as natural characteristics. After reviewing basic positions in contemporary philosophy of mind, we examine the Gestalt position, characterizing it m terms of phenomenal realism and programmatic reductionism. We then distinguish Gestalt philosophy of mind from instrumentalism and (...)
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  43.  85
    Does Any Aspect of Mind Survive Brain Damage That Typically Leads to a Persistent Vegetative State? Ethical Considerations.Jaak Panksepp, Thomas Fuchs, Victor Abella Garcia & Adam Lesiak - 2007 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 2:32-.
    Recent neuroscientific evidence brings into question the conclusion that all aspects of consciousness are gone in patients who have descended into a persistent vegetative state (PVS). Here we summarize the evidence from human brain imaging as well as neurological damage in animals and humans suggesting that some form of consciousness can survive brain damage that commonly causes PVS. We also raise the issue that neuroscientific evidence indicates that raw emotional feelings (primary-process affects) can exist without any cognitive awareness of those (...)
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  44. Embodied Cognitive Neuroscience and its Consequences for Psychiatry.Thomas Fuchs - 2009 - Poiesis and Praxis 6 (3-4):219-233.
    Recent years have seen the emergence of a new interdisciplinary field called embodied or enactive cognitive science. Whereas traditional representationalism rests on a fixed inside–outside distinction, the embodied cognition perspective views mind and brain as a biological system that is rooted in body experience and interaction with other individuals. Embodiment refers to both the embedding of cognitive processes in brain circuitry and to the origin of these processes in an organism’s sensory–motor experience. Thus, action and perception are no longer interpreted (...)
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  45.  41
    The Ghost in the Machine: Disembodiment in Schizophrenia - Two Case Studies.Sanneke de Haan & Thomas Fuchs - 2010 - Psychopathology 43 (5):327-333.
    The notion of embodiment is central to the phenomenological approach to schizophrenia. This paper argues that fundamental concepts for the understanding of schizophrenia have a bodily dimension. We present two single cases of first-onset schizophrenic patients and analyze the reports of their experiences. Problems such as loss of self, loss of common sense, and intentionality disorders reveal a disconnectedness that can be traced back to a detachment from the lived body. Hyperreflectivity and hyperautomaticity are used as coping mechanisms, but reflect (...)
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  46. The Psychopathology of Hyperreflexivity.Thomas Fuchs - 2010 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 24 (3):239-255.
    The structure of human embodiment is fundamentally characterized by a polarity or ambiguity between Leib and Körper, the subjective body and the objectified body, or between being-body and having-a-body. This ambiguity, emphasized, above all, by Helmuth Plessner and Maurice Merleau-Ponty, is also of crucial significance for psychopathology. Insofar as mental illnesses disturb or interrupt the unhindered conduct of one’s life, they also exacerbate the tension within embodiment that holds between being-body and having-a-body. In mental illnesses, there is a failure of (...)
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  47.  39
    Who Shall Live?: Health, Economics, and Social Choice.Victor R. Fuchs - 2011 - World Scientific.
    Problems and choices -- Who shall live? -- The physician : the captain of the team -- The hospital : the house of hope -- Drugs : the key to modern medicine -- Paying for medical care.
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  48. 18 Ethical Issues in Chronic Pain Research.Robert J. Gatchel, Perry N. Fuchs & Colin Allen - 2006 - In B. L. Gant & M. E. Schatman (eds.), Ethical Issues in Chronic Pain Management. pp. 295.
    As the above quote clearly highlights, it is the responsibility of researchers and research supervisors to be certain that their research staff and students assistants are very familiar with all of the ethical principles and current standards relevant to the research they are conducting. Indeed, they must take an active role in being certain that their research staff and students complete appropriate training in these ethical principles and standards, and how they apply them to the research context in which they (...)
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  49. Mary Meets Molyneux: The Explanatory Gap and the Individuation of Phenomenal Concepts.Macdonald Cynthia - 2004 - Noûs 38 (3):503-524.
    It is widely accepted that physicalism faces its most serious challenge when it comes to making room for the phenomenal character of psychological experience, its so-called what-it-is-like aspect. The challenge has surfaced repeatedly over the past two decades in a variety of forms. In a particularly striking one, Frank Jackson considers a situation in which Mary, a brilliant scientist who knows all the physical facts there are to know about psychological experience, has spent the whole of her life in a (...)
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  50.  54
    Implicit and Explicit Temporality.Thomas Fuchs - 2005 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 12 (3):195-198.
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