Results for 'Cynthia Read'

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  39
    The Impossibility of Conscious Desire.Donovan Hulse, Cynthia Read & Timothy Schroeder - 2004 - American Philosophical Quarterly 41 (1):73 - 80.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  2. Searle's Intentional Mistake.Donovan Hulse & Cynthia Read - manuscript
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  1
    On Philosophy's Progress: From Plato to Wittgenstein : R. Read.R. Read - 2010 - Philosophy 85 (3):341-367.
    I argue that the type of progress exhibited by philosophy is not that exhibited by science, but rather is akin to the kind of progress exhibited be someone becoming ‘older and wiser’. However, as actually-existing philosophy has gotten older, it has not always gotten wiser. As an illustration, I consider Rawls's conception of justification. I argue that Rawls's notion of what it is to have a philosophical justification exhibits no progress at all from Euthyphro's. In fact, drawing on a remark (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. Thinking About Logic: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Logic.Stephen Read - 1994 - Oxford University Press.
    In this book, Stephen Read sets out to rescue logic from its undeserved reputation as an inflexible, dogmatic discipline by demonstrating that its technicalities and processes are founded on assumptions which are themselves amenable to philosophical investigation. He examines the fundamental principles of consequence, logical truth and correct inference within the context of logic, and shows that the principles by which we delineate consequences are themselves not guaranteed free from error. Central to the notion of truth is the beguiling (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   13 citations  
  5. The New Hume Debate: Revised Edition.Rupert Read & Kenneth Richman (eds.) - 2008 - Routledge.
    For decades scholars thought they knew Hume's position on the existence of causes and objects he was a sceptic. However, this received view has been thrown into question by the `new readings of Hume as a sceptical realist. For philosophers, students of philosophy and others interested in theories of causation and their history, The New Hume Debate is the first book to fully document the most influential contemporary readings of Hume's work. Throughout, the volume brings the debate beyond textual issues (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  6.  25
    Harmonic Inferentialism and the Logic of Identity.Stephen Read - unknown
    Inferentialism claims that the rules for the use of an expression express its meaning without any need to invoke meanings or denotations for them. Logical inferentialism endorses inferentialism specically for the logical constants. Harmonic inferentialism, as the term is introduced here, usually but not necessarily a subbranch of logical inferentialism, follows Gentzen in proposing that it is the introduction-rules whch give expressions their meaning and the elimination-rules should accord harmoniously with the meaning so given. It is proposed here that the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  9
    Wittgenstein Among the Sciences: Wittgensteinian Investigations Into the "Scientific Method".Rupert J. Read - 2011 - Ashgate.
    Acknowledgments -- Preface -- Editor's introduction -- Wittgenstein, Kuhn, and natural science : science : a perspicuous presentation -- Kuhn : the Wittgenstein of the sciences? -- Kuhn on incommensurability : inhabiting the standard reading -- Wittgenstein on incommensurability : the view from "inside" -- Values : another kind of incommensurability? -- Does Kuhn have a model of science? -- Inter-section : a schematic elicitation of Wittgensteinian criteria -- Wittgenstein, Winch, and "human science" : social science -- The ghost of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  8.  6
    Risky Business.Rupert Read & David Burnham - unknown
    Rupert Read and David Burnham on what philosophy can tell us about dealing with uncertainty, systemic risk, and potential catastrophe.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  41
    Time and Decision: Economic and Psychological Perspectives on Intertemporal Choice.George Loewenstein, Daniel Read & Roy Baumeister (eds.) - 2003 - Russell Sage Foundation.
    Introduction George Loewenstein, Daniel Read, and Roy F. Baumeister P _L sychology and economics have a classic love-hate relationship. ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  10.  43
    Iain McGilchrist, The Master and His Emissary: The Divided Brain and the Making of the Western World (New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2010). [REVIEW]Rupert Read - 2012 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 11 (1):119-124.
    Iain McGilchrist, The master and his emissary: the divided brain and the making of the Western world (New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2010) Content Type Journal Article Category Book Review Pages 119-124 DOI 10.1007/s11097-011-9235-x Authors Rupert Read, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK Journal Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences Online ISSN 1572-8676 Print ISSN 1568-7759 Journal Volume Volume 11 Journal Issue Volume 11, Number 1.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  3
    Johannes Buridanus: Summulae de Practica Sophismatum (review).Stephen Read - 2007 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 45 (1):157-158.
    Stephen Read - Johannes Buridanus: Summulae de Practica Sophismatum - Journal of the History of Philosophy 45:1 Journal of the History of Philosophy 45.1 157-158 Muse Search Journals This Journal Contents Reviewed by Stephen Read University of St. Andrews Fabienne Pironet, editor. Johannes Buridanus: Summulae de Practica Sophismatum. Artistarium 10–9. Turnhout: Brepols 2004. Pp. xlix + 193. Paper, €40.00. John Buridan was an unusual figure in fourteenth-century logic and philosophy. Logic was at that time largely the preserve of (...)
    Translate
      Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  1
    The Order and Connection of Ideology Is the Same as the Order and Connection of Exploitation.Jason Read - 2015 - Philosophy Today 59 (2):175-189.
    The turn to Spinoza by many Marxists combines the classic problem of Marxism, that of base and superstructure, economy and ideology, with Spinoza’s challenging assertion of the identity of order of connection of ideas and things. This paper looks at two contemporary neo-Spinozists, Frédéric Lordon and Yves Citton, examining the ways in which their works intertwine economy and ideology, desire and imagination. The point, however, is not to just read Marx with Spinoza, but to use both together to make (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. The Cambridge Companion to Medieval Logic.Catarina Dutilh Novaes & Stephen Read (eds.) - 2016 - Cambridge University Press.
    This volume, the first dedicated and comprehensive companion to medieval logic, covers both the Latin and the Arabic traditions, and shows that they were in fact sister traditions, which both arose against the background of a Hellenistic heritage and which influenced one another over the centuries. A series of chapters by both established and younger scholars covers the whole period including early and late developments, and offers new insights into this extremely rich period in the history of logic. The volume (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. Johannes Buridanus: Summulae de Practica Sophismatum. [REVIEW]Stephen Read - 2007 - Journal of the History of Ideas 45:157-158.
    Stephen Read - Johannes Buridanus: Summulae de Practica Sophismatum - Journal of the History of Philosophy 45:1 Journal of the History of Philosophy 45.1 157-158 Muse Search Journals This Journal Contents Reviewed by Stephen Read University of St. Andrews Fabienne Pironet, editor. Johannes Buridanus: Summulae de Practica Sophismatum. Artistarium 10–9. Turnhout: Brepols 2004. Pp. xlix + 193. Paper, €40.00. John Buridan was an unusual figure in fourteenth-century logic and philosophy. Logic was at that time largely the preserve of (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. The Politics of the Unpolitical.Herbert Read - 2015 - Routledge.
    In this collection of fourteen essays, first published in 1943, Herbert Read extends and amplifies the points of view expressed in his successful pamphlet To Hell with Culture , which has been reprinted here. The ‘politics of the unpolitical’ are the politics of those who strive for human values and not for national or sectional interests. Herbert Read defines these values and demands their recognition as a solvent of social and cultural crises’, and looks forward to the future (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  20
    What 'There Can Be No Such Thing as Meaning Anything by Any Word' Could Possibly Mean.Rupert Read - 2000 - In Alice Crary & Rupert Read (eds.), The New Wittgenstein. Routledge.
  17.  15
    The Unstatability of Kripkean Scepticism.Rupert Read - 1995 - Philosophical Papers 24 (1):67-74.
  18.  1
    Cruces Propertianae.J. D. Morgan - 1986 - Classical Quarterly 36 (01):182-.
    In classical antiquity Propertius' eloquence was renowned. His successor Ovid referred to the blandi praecepta Properti and to blandi…Propertius oris . Quintilian stated that to his taste the most tersus and elegans Latin elegist was Tibullus, but sunt qui Propertium malint. Martial mentioned the facundi carmen iuuenale Properti. Turn now from the opinions of ancient authors to those of some modern commentators as they try to elucidate various passages as presented in the extant manuscripts, and you encounter not the adjectives (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19. Cruces Propertianae.J. Morgan - 1986 - Classical Quarterly 36 (1):182-198.
    In classical antiquity Propertius' eloquence was renowned. His successor Ovid referred to the blandi praecepta Properti and to blandi…Propertius oris. Quintilian stated that to his taste the most tersus and elegans Latin elegist was Tibullus, but sunt qui Propertium malint. Martial mentioned the facundi carmen iuuenale Properti. Turn now from the opinions of ancient authors to those of some modern commentators as they try to elucidate various passages as presented in the extant manuscripts, and you encounter not the adjectives blandus, (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. Herbert Read Formlessness and Form : An Introduction to His Aesthetics.David Thistlewood - 1984
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. Inherited Representations Are Read in Development.Nicholas Shea - 2013 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 64 (1):1-31.
    Recent theoretical work has identified a tightly-constrained sense in which genes carry representational content. Representational properties of the genome are founded in the transmission of DNA over phylogenetic time and its role in natural selection. However, genetic representation is not just relevant to questions of selection and evolution. This paper goes beyond existing treatments and argues for the heterodox view that information generated by a process of selection over phylogenetic time can be read in ontogenetic time, in the course (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  22. Misreadings, Clarifications and Reminders: A Reply to Hutchinson and Read.Daniel D. Hutto - 2006 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 14 (4):561 – 567.
    This is a reply to Hutchinson, P. and Read, R. “An Elucidatory Interpretation of Wittgenstein’s Tractatus: Critique of Daniel D. Hutto’s and Marie McGinn’s Reading of Tractatus 6.54″. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 14(1) 2006: 1-29. A further reply from Hutchinson, P.”Unsinnig: A Reply to Hutto” is also forthcoming.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  30
    We Read Minds to Shape Relationships.Vivian Bohl - 2015 - Philosophical Psychology 28 (5):674-694.
    Mindreading is often considered to be the most important human social cognitive skill, and over the past three decades, several theories of the cognitive mechanisms for mindreading have been proposed. But why do we read minds? According to the standard view, we attribute mental states to individuals to predict and explain their behavior. I argue that the standard view is too general to capture the distinctive function of mindreading, and that it does not explain what motivates people to (...) minds. In order to understand why mindreading is evolutionarily adaptive, individually beneficial, and motivationally compelling, we need to include another level of explanation: the level of social relationships. I introduce a theory of the cognitive underpinnings of social relationships—the relational models theory of Alan Fiske. I outline the hypothesis that the function of mindreading is to shape social relations. I further hypothesize that mindreading is often motivated by social emotions. If mindreading serves r.. (shrink)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  24.  21
    Why Read Literature? The Cognitive Function of Form.Wolfgang Huemer - 2007 - In John Gibson, Wolfgang Huemer & Luca Pocci (eds.), A Sense of the world. Essays on Fiction, Narrative and Knowledge. Routledge. pp. 233-245.
    In this article I focus on the question question of why we actually do read literary texts and what the merits of engaging with literary works are. The central argument is that (among the many other functions literature is abile to perform) literature is cognitively valuable by focusing not on what is said, but on how it is said. Reading literary texts adds to our expressive capacities, enriches our conceptual schemes and can so allow us to get a better (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  25.  5
    To Read or Not to Read: Decoding Synthetic Phonics.Andrew Davis - 2013 - Impact 2013 (20):1-38.
    In England, current government policy on children's reading is strongly prescriptive, insisting on the delivery of a pure and exclusive form of synthetic phonics, where letter sounds are learned and blended in order to ‘read’ text. A universally imposed phonics ‘check’ is taken by all five year olds and the results are widely reported. These policies are underpinned by the claim that research has shown systematic synthetic phonics to be the most effective way of teaching children to read. (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  26.  9
    How to Read the Tractatus Sequentially.Tim Kraft - 2016 - Nordic Wittgenstein Review 5 (2):91-124.
    One of the unconventional features of Wittgenstein’s _Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus_ is its use of an elaborated and detailed numbering system. Recently, Bazzocchi, Hacker und Kuusela have argued that the numbering system means that the _Tractatus_ must be read and interpreted not as a sequentially ordered book, but as a text with a two-dimensional, tree-like structure. Apart from being able to explain how the _Tractatus_ was composed, the tree reading allegedly solves exegetical issues both on the local and the global level. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  23
    Can Hume Be Read as a Virtue Ethicist?Christine Swanton - 2007 - Hume Studies 33 (1):91-113.
    It is not unusual now for Hume to be read as part of a virtue ethical tradition. However there are a number of obstacles in the way of such a reading: subjectivist, irrationalist, hedonistic, and consequentialist interpretations of Hume. In this paper I support a virtue ethical reading by arguing against all these interpretations. In the course of these arguments I show how Hume should be understood as part of a virtue ethical tradition which is sentimentalist in a response-dependent (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  28.  36
    Why Read Marx Today?Jonathan Wolff - 2002 - Oxford University Press.
    The fall of the Berlin Wall had enormous symbolic resonance, marking the collapse of Marxist politics and economics. Indeed, Marxist regimes have failed miserably, and with them, it seems, all reason to take the writings of Karl Marx seriously. Jonathan Wolff argues that if we detach Marx the critic of current society from Marx the prophet of some never-to-be-realized worker's paradise, he remains the most impressive critic we have of liberal, capitalist, bourgeois society. The author shows how Marx's main ideas (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  29.  38
    What Mary Didn't Read: On Literary Narratives and Knowledge.László Kajtár - 2016 - Ratio 29 (3):327-343.
    In the philosophy of art, one of the most important debates concerns the so-called ‘cognitive value’ of literature. The main question is phrased in various ways. Can literary narratives provide knowledge? Can readers learn from works of literature? Most of the discussants agree on an affirmative answer, but it is contested what the relevant notions of truth and knowledge are and whether this knowledge and learning influence aesthetic or literary value. The issue takes on a wider, not only philosophical, importance (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  41
    Are Genetic Representations Read in Development?R. J. Planer - 2016 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 67 (4):997-1023.
    The status of genes as bearers of semantic content remains very much in dispute among philosophers of biology. In a series of papers, Nicholas Shea has argued that his ‘infotel’ theory of semantics vindicates the claim that genes carry semantic content. On Shea’s account, each organism is associated with a ‘developmental system’ that takes genetic representations as inputs and produces whole-organism traits as outputs. Moreover, at least in his most recent work on the topic, Shea is explicit in claiming that (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  8
    Teaching How to Read Ethics Texts With the Help of Kierkegaard’s “The Mirror of the Word”.Matthew T. Nowachek - 2016 - Teaching Ethics 16 (1):103-120.
    This essay develops the argument that Søren Kierkegaard’s text “The Mirror of the Word” can serve as a valuable resource for addressing the problem of poor reading habits of students enrolled in introductory ethics courses. Although Kierkegaard writes this text as a way of challenging his Danish contemporaries to read the Bible in a proper manner, it can nevertheless apply to reading ethics texts in that the underlying point Kierkegaard makes is the importance of reading in such a fashion (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  24
    I Can't Read (Directions)!Penelope Miller - 2012 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 46 (3):1-21.
    “I can’t read. Show me” is a student’s cry heard by teachers of the arts in all kinds of classes. Demonstrating a particular process one on one is a very effective way to learn, but sometimes teachers need a way for students to take notes or follow a guide to aid in remembering a complex technique. Notation systems have developed as the educational solution to this need.1 Adela Bay, a private piano teacher, relates in her book’s dedication the reason (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33.  37
    A Shaggy Soul Story: How Not to Read the Wax Tablet Model in Plato's Theaetetus.Raphael Woolf - 2004 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 69 (3):573–604.
    This paper sets out to re-examine the famous Wax Tablet model in Plato's Theaetetus, in particular the section of it which appeals to the quality of individual souls' wax as an explanation of why some are more liable to make mistakes than others (194c-195a). This section has often been regarded as an ornamental flourish or a humorous appendage to the model's main explanatory business. Yet in their own appropriations both Aristotle and Locke treat the notion of variable wax quality as (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  22
    Can Nonhuman Primates Read Minds?Joëlle Proust - 1999 - Philosophical Topics 27 (1):203-232.
    Granted that a given species is able to entertain beliefs and desires, i.e. to have (epistemic and motivational) internal states with semantically evaluable contents, one can raise the question of whether the species under investigation is, in addition, able to represent properties and events that are not only perceptual or physical, but mental, and use the latter to guide their actions, not only as reliable cues for achieving some output, but as mental cues (that is: whether it can 'read (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35.  12
    Art, Education, and Revolution: Herbert Read and the Reorientation of British Anarchism.Matthew S. Adams - 2013 - History of European Ideas 39 (5):709-728.
    It is popularly believed that British anarchism underwent a ‘renaissance’ in the 1960s, as conventional revolutionary tactics were replaced by an ethos of permanent protest. Often associated with Colin Ward and his journal Anarchy, this tactical shift is said to have occurred due to growing awareness of Gustav Landauer's work. This article challenges these readings by focusing on Herbert Read's book Education through Art, a work motivated by Read's dissatisfaction with anarchism's association with political violence. Arguing that aesthetic (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36.  12
    Why Should I Read Histories of Science?Mark Erickson - 2010 - History of the Human Sciences 23 (4):68-91.
    History of science is, we are told, an important subject for study. Its rise in recent years to become a ‘stand alone’ discipline has been mirrored by an expansion of popular history of science texts available in bookstores. Given this, it is perhaps surprising that little attention has been given to how history of science is written. This article attempts to do that through constructing a typology of histories of science based upon a consideration of audiences who read these (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  5
    What's Love Got to Do with It?: Mapping Cynthia in Propertius' Paired Elegies 1.8 AB and 1.11-12.Sara H. Lindheim - 2011 - American Journal of Philology 132 (4):633-665.
    As he concludes poem 1.12, Propertius romantically asserts that Cynthia was prima and will be the finis. This article explores the supplemental readings that open up if we focus not on the temporal but on the geographical meaning of the word finis, a move invited by the poem itself and by the poems with which it belongs interpretively, all containing several allusions to space. Drawing on both Lacanian and cartographic theory, I suggest that the poet's engagement with questions of (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38.  19
    Cavell, Literacy and What It Means to Read.Amanda J. Fulford - 2009 - Ethics and Education 4 (1):43-55.
    This paper explores three current notions of literacy, which underpin the theorisation and practice of teaching and learning for both children and adults in England. In so doing, it raises certain problems inherent in these approaches to literacy and literacy education and shows how Stanley Cavell's notions of reading, and especially his reading of Thoreau's Walden , help to construct a notion not of literacy, but of being literate. The paper takes four themes central to Cavell's work in his The (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39.  8
    How to Read Athenaeus' Deipnosophists.John Paulas - 2012 - American Journal of Philology 133 (3):403-439.
    Scholarly interest in the literary aspects of Athenaeus’ Deipnosophists has increased greatly over the last decade, but little analysis proceeds from the perspective of the reader. This article seeks to redress that situation by showing how “readerly” engagement involving inter- and intratext renders Athenaeus’ text both meaningful and pleasurable to read. I analyze the text as a dramatization of acts of reading inter- and intratextually. Such reading broadly employs symbolism and symbolic language. Understanding this way of reading and its (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  4
    Cynthia Cockburn and Dubravka Zarkov , The Postwar Moment. Militaries, Masculinities and International Peacekeeping. Bosnia and the Netherlands.Gabrielle Varro - 2015 - Temporalités 21.
    Une approche de « regards croisés » est adoptée dans l’ouvrage que dirige ici Cynthia Cockburn en collaboration avec Dubravka Zarkov : d’une part, douze auteurs se répartissent sur deux postes d’observation, la Bosnie-Herzégovine et les Pays Bas et d’autre part, leurs points de vues sont spécifiques selon leurs appartenances professionnelles et disciplinaires. Le point focal du volume est contenu dans le titre, difficile à rendre en français : qu’est-ce qu’un « moment post..
    No categories
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41.  7
    La question de la tolérance en Occident et en islam à travers le livre de Yves-Charles Zarka et Cynthia Fleury : Difficile tolérance.Makram Abbes - 2005 - Astérion 3:325-375.
    Difficile tolérance est écrit par Yves-Charles Zarka avec la collaboration de Cynthia Fleury en vue d’étudier la question de la tolérance dans les sociétés occidentales et la place qu’occupent les communautés arabo-musulmanes au sein de ces sociétés. Les deux auteurs mettent l’accent sur l’incompatibilité entre les valeurs de l’Occident et celles de l’islam ; ils défendent l’idée de l’impossibilité de l’émergence de la tolérance dans la culture de l’islam et soulignent la nécessité de réagir face aux revendications communautaires, de (...)
    Translate
      Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42.  4
    The Logic of Religious Language1: CYNTHIA B. COHEN.Cynthia B. Cohen - 1973 - Religious Studies 9 (2):143-155.
    Expressions used in religious contexts have often seemed odd and paradoxical to philosophers. Statements have appeared in Christian discourse to the effect that God is not a person and yet is a person, that he is a servant and a king, that he is nothingness and being itself. These statements appear unintelligible either because their terms are self-contradictory or because they are mutually exclusive.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43.  14
    Kuhnenstein: Or, the Importance of Being Read.Steve Fuller - 2005 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 35 (4):480-498.
    I respond to Rupert Read's highly critical review of my Kuhn vs Popper: The Struggle for the Soul Science . In contrast to my pro-Popper take on the debate, Read promotes a Wittgenstein-inflected Kuhn, whom I dub "Kuhnenstein." Kuhnenstein is largely the figment of Read's—and others'—fertile philosophical imagination as channeled through scholastic philosophical practice. Contra Read, I argue that Kuhnenstein provides not only a poor basis for social epistemology but Kuhnenstein's prominence itself exemplifies a poor social (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44. Read on Bradwardine on the Liar Paradox.David Miller - unknown
    The thesis of the present note is that the resemblance between Bradwardine’s highly instructive definition of truth, and what emerges from Tarski’s method of defining truth, is much closer than Read’s discussion reveals. Each approach, however, has serious defects.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45.  12
    Read Them, Then You Simply Must!Peter Singer - manuscript
    After reading Fouts' Next Of Kin I was speechless. I can express how wonderful it is to learn from an individual whose humility, concern for life and compassion is his life work. I simply could not put the book down! It was one of the most thoughtful, eye-opening, and educated books that I have ever read. Having the opportunity to listen to Roger Fouts speak on book tour, my heart opened to his message of compassion; his willingness to express (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46.  4
    How to Read a Graveyard: Journeys in the Company of the Dead [Book Review].Marie T. Farrell - 2013 - Australasian Catholic Record, The 90 (4):503.
    Farrell, Marie T Review(s) of: How to read a graveyard: Journeys in the company of the dead, by Peter Stanford (London: Bloomsbury, 2013), pp.263, $32.95.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47.  3
    Do Volunteers in Schools Help Children Learn to Read? A Systematic Review of Randomised Controlled Trials.Carole J. Torgerson, Sarah E. King & Amanda J. Sowden - 2002 - Educational Studies 28 (4):433-444.
    The aim of unpaid volunteer classroom assistants is to give extra support to children learning to read. The impact of using volunteers to improve children's acquisition of reading skills is unknown. To assess whether volunteers are effective in improving children's reading, we undertook a systematic review of all relevant randomised controlled trials (RCTs). An exhaustive search of all the main electronic databases was carried out (i.e. BEI, PsycInfo, ASSIA, PAIS, SSCI, ERIC, SPECTR, SIGLE). We identified eight experimental studies, of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48.  2
    The Computation of Partial Recursive Word‐Functions Without Read Instructions.Holger Petersen - 1996 - Mathematical Logic Quarterly 42 (1):312-318.
    In this note we consider register-machines with symbol manipulation capabilities. They can form words over a given alphabet in their registers by appending symbols to the strings already stored. These machines are similar to Post's normal systems and the related machine-models discussed in the literature. But unlike the latter devices they are deterministic and are not allowed to read symbols from the front of the registers. Instead they can compare registers and erase them. At first glance it is surprising (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49.  2
    Review Essay Read It at Chapter: Francis of Assisi and the Scritti.Read It At Chapter - 2002 - Franciscan Studies 60:341.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50.  1
    Information for Consent: Too Long and Too Hard to Read.John S. G. Biggs & August Marchesi - 2015 - Research Ethics 11 (3):133-141.
    The length of participant information sheets for research and difficulties in their comprehension have been a cause of increasing concern. We aimed to examine the information sheets in research proposals submitted to an Australian HREC in one year, comparing the results with national recommendations and published data. Information sheets in all 86 research submissions were analysed using available software. The work of Flesch was used for Reading Ease or Readability and that of Flesch and Kincaid for the level of education (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 1000