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David Barner [17]D. Barner [3]
  1.  18
    Does Learning to Count Involve a Semantic Induction?Kathryn Davidson, Kortney Eng & David Barner - 2012 - Cognition 123 (1):162-173.
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  2.  30
    Quantity Judgments and Individuation: Evidence That Mass Nouns Count.David Barner & Jesse Snedeker - 2005 - Cognition 97 (1):41-66.
  3.  19
    The Interpretation of Functional Heads: Using Comparatives to Explore the Mass/Count Distinction.A. C. Bale & D. Barner - 2009 - Journal of Semantics 26 (3):217-252.
    Comparative judgments for mass and count nouns yield two generalizations. First, all words that can be used in both mass and count syntax (e.g. rock, string, apple, water) always denote individuals when used in count syntax but never when used in mass syntax (e.g. too many rocks v. too much rock). Second, some mass nouns denote individuals (e.g. furniture) while others do not (e.g. water). In this article, we show that no current theory of mass–count semantics can capture these two (...)
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  4.  12
    Accessing the Unsaid: The Role of Scalar Alternatives in Children’s Pragmatic Inference.David Barner, Neon Brooks & Alan Bale - 2011 - Cognition 118 (1):84-93.
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  5.  36
    Evidence for a Non-Linguistic Distinction Between Singular and Plural Sets in Rhesus Monkeys.David Barner, Justin Wood, Marc Hauser & Susan Carey - 2008 - Cognition 107 (2):603-622.
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  6.  16
    How Tall is Tall? Compositionality, Statistics, and Gradable Adjectives.Lauren A. Schmidt, Noah D. Goodman, David Barner & Joshua B. Tenenbaum - 2009 - In N. A. Taatgen & H. van Rijn (eds.), Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society.
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  7.  11
    Language, Thought, and Real Nouns.David Barner, Shunji Inagaki & Peggy Li - 2009 - Cognition 111 (3):329-344.
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  8.  10
    Free-Ranging Rhesus Monkeys Spontaneously Individuate and Enumerate Small Numbers of Non-Solid Portions.Justin N. Wood, Marc D. Hauser, David D. Glynn & David Barner - 2008 - Cognition 106 (1):207-221.
  9.  3
    Slow Mapping: Color Word Learning as a Gradual Inductive Process.Katie Wagner, Karen Dobkins & David Barner - 2013 - Cognition 127 (3):307-317.
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  10.  3
    Events and the Ontology of Individuals: Verbs as a Source of Individuating Mass and Count Nouns.David Barner, Laura Wagner & Jesse Snedeker - 2008 - Cognition 106 (2):805-832.
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  11.  20
    Linguistic Relativity.Peggy Li & David Barner - 2011 - Cognitive Science 2:253-265.
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  12.  1
    Learning Language From Within: Children Use Semantic Generalizations to Infer Word Meanings.Mahesh Srinivasan, Sara Al-Mughairy, Ruthe Foushee & David Barner - 2017 - Cognition 159:11-24.
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  13.  22
    Acquiring the Meaning of Free Relative Clauses and Plural Definite Descriptions.I. Caponigro, L. Pearl, N. Brooks & D. Barner - 2012 - Journal of Semantics 29 (2):261-293.
    Plural definite descriptions (e.g. the things on the plate) and free relative clauses (e.g. what is on the plate) have been argued to share the same semantic properties, despite their syntactic differences. Specifically, both have been argued to be non-quantificational expressions referring to the maximal element of a given set (e.g. the set of things on the contextually salient plate). We provide experimental support for this semantic analysis with the first reported simultaneous investigation of children’s interpretation of both constructions, highlighting (...)
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  14.  5
    Ignorance and Inference: Do Problems with Gricean Epistemic Reasoning Explain Children's Difficulty with Scalar Implicature?L. Hochstein, A. Bale, D. Fox & D. Barner - forthcoming - Journal of Semantics.
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  15.  9
    Children's Sensitivity to Ulterior Motives When Evaluating Prosocial Behavior.Gail Heyman, David Barner, Jennifer Heumann & Lauren Schenck - 2014 - Cognitive Science 38 (4):683-700.
    Reasoning about ulterior motives was investigated among children ages 6–10 years (total N = 119). In each of two studies, participants were told about children who offered gifts to peers who needed help. Each giver chose to present a gift in either a public setting, which is consistent with having an ulterior motive to enhance one's reputation, or in a private setting, which is not consistent with having an ulterior motive. In each study, the 6- to 7-year olds showed no (...)
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  16.  16
    In Defense of Intuitive Mathematical Theories as the Basis for Natural Number.David Barner - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (6):643-644.
    Though there are holes in the theory of how children move through stages of numerical competence, the current approach offers the most promising avenue for characterizing changes in competence as children confront new mathematical concepts. Like the science of mathematics, children's discovery of number is rooted in intuitions about sets, and not purely in analytic truths.
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  17.  3
    The Amelia Bedelia Effect: World Knowledge and the Goal Bias in Language Acquisition.Mahesh Srinivasan & David Barner - 2013 - Cognition 128 (3):431-450.
  18. The Interpretation of Functional Heads: Using Comparatives to Explore the Mass/Count Distinction: Articles.Alan C. Bale & David Barner - 2009 - Journal of Semantics 26 (3):217-252.
    Comparative judgments for mass and count nouns yield two generalizations. First, all words that can be used in both mass and count syntax always denote individuals when used in count syntax but never when used in mass syntax. Second, some mass nouns denote individuals while others do not. In this article, we show that no current theory of mass–count semantics can capture these two facts and argue for an alternative theory that can. We propose that lexical roots are not specified (...)
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  19. Representing Exact Number Visually Using Mental Abacus.Michael C. Frank & David Barner - 2012 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 141 (1):134-149.
  20. B1–B11.Justin N. Wood, Elizabeth S. Spelke, David Barner, Jesse Snedeker, Min Wang, Charles A. Perfetti, Ying Liu, Filip van Opstal, Bert Reynvoet & Tom Verguts - 2005 - Cognition 97:339-341.
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