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  1.  2
    Philosophical Dimensions of Cinematic Experience.David Davies - 2019 - In Christina Rawls, Diana Neiva & Steven Gouveia (eds.), Philosophy and Film: Bridging Divides. New York: Routledge. pp. 135-156.
    This chapter critically examines the idea that some cinematic artworks “do philosophy”. It is argued that any interesting “film as philosophy” thesis must satisfy two conditions: (FP1) In any advance in philosophical understanding attributable to a cinematic artwork, the philosophical content through which such an advance is accomplished must be articulated in a manner that is distinctively cinematic, on a proper understanding of the latter; (FP2) The advance in philosophical understanding attributable to a cinematic artwork must occur in the course (...)
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  2.  27
    Art as Performance.Dave Davies - 2003 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    In this richly argued and provocative book, David Davies elaborates and defends a broad conceptual framework for thinking about the arts that reveals important continuities and discontinuities between traditional and modern art, and between different artistic disciplines. Elaborates and defends a broad conceptual framework for thinking about the arts. Offers a provocative view about the kinds of things that artworks are and how they are to be understood. Reveals important continuities and discontinuities between traditional and modern art. Highlights core topics (...)
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  3. Art as Performance.David Davies - 2005 - Philosophical Quarterly 55 (221):694-696.
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  4.  6
    Art as Performance.David Davies - 2005 - Mind 114 (453):137-141.
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  5.  24
    Can Film Be A Philosophical Medium?David Davies - 2008 - Postgraduate Journal of Aesthetics 5 (2):1-20.
    A recent panel at the annual meetings of the American Society for Aesthetics had the title “Can films philosophize?” The answer is, obviously, no, if we take this question literally. But books can’t philosophize either, in this sense. People philosophize, and they generally use natural language as the medium in which they carry out this activity. So our question is, can film serve as a philosophical medium in the ways, or in some of the ways, that language does? To answer (...)
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  6.  86
    Philosophy of the Performing Arts.David Davies - 2011 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    This book provides an accessible yet sophisticated introduction to the significant philosophical issues concerning the performing arts.
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  7.  9
    Art as Performance.David Davies - 2005 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 63 (1):77-80.
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  8. Thought Experiments and Fictional Narratives.David Davies - 2007 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 7 (1):29-45.
    I explore the possibility that there are interesting and illuminating paralleIs to be drawn between issues central to the philosophical literature on scientific thought experiments (TE’s) and issues central to the phlilosophical literature on standard fictional narratives. I examine three related questions: (a) To what extent are TE’s (like) standard fictional narratives? (b) Is the understanding of TE’s like the understanding of standard fictional narratives? (c) Most significantly, are there illuminating paralIeIs to be drawn between the ‘epistemological problem’ of TE’s (...)
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  9.  5
    Aesthetics and Literature.David Davies - 2008 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 66 (4):406-407.
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  10.  87
    The Primacy of Practice in the Ontology of Art.David Davies - 2009 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 67 (2):159-171.
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  11.  61
    Enigmatic Variations.David Davies - 2012 - The Monist 95 (4):643-662.
  12.  52
    Fictive Utterance and the Fictionality of Narratives and Works.David Davies - 2015 - British Journal of Aesthetics 55 (1):39-55.
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  13. Collingwood's ‘Performance’ Theory of Art.David Davies - 2008 - British Journal of Aesthetics 48 (2):162-174.
    Even if we reject the Wollheimian reading of Collingwood as an Idealist in the ontology of art, it remains puzzling how his non-Idealist ontology fits with his idea of art as expression. In trying to clarifying these matters, I argue that (i) the work of art, for Collingwood, is an activity, not the product of an activity; (ii) puzzling features of the Principles arise from attempts to reconcile this claim with the idea of art as expression while preserving the art/craft (...)
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  14.  26
    Varying Impressions.David Davies - 2015 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 73 (1):81-92.
    My aim in this article is to locate various forms of printmaking in a broader framework for thinking about so-called ‘multiple’ artworks, artworks that, as this is normally put, admit of multiple instances. I first sketch a general framework for the philosophical exploration of multiple artworks and the philosophical issues to which they give rise. I then address certain forms of printmaking that might be thought to generate singular rather than multiple artworks. Next, I look at how those print works (...)
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  15.  18
    Dancing Around the Issues: Prospects for an Empirically Grounded Philosophy of Dance.David Davies - 2013 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 71 (2):195-202.
  16.  21
    Descriptivism and Its Discontents.David Davies - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 75 (2):117-129.
    Is ontologizing about art rightly held accountable to artistic practice, and, if so, how? Julian Dodd argues against such accountability. His target is “local descriptivism,” a meta-ontological principle that he contrasts with meta-ontological realism. The local descriptivist thinks that folk-theoretic beliefs implicit in our practices somehow determine the ontological characters of artworks. I argue, however, that according a grounding role to artistic practice in the ontology of art does not conflict with meta-ontological realism. Practice must ground our ontological inquiries because (...)
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  17.  59
    Dodd on the 'Audibility' of Musical Works.David Davies - 2009 - British Journal of Aesthetics 49 (2):99-108.
    Julian Dodd has argued that the type–token theory in musical ontology has a ‘default’ status because it can explain the repeatability and audibility of musical works without the need for philosophical reinterpretation. I present two challenges to Dodd's claims about audibility. First, I argue (a) that a type–token theorist who, like Dodd, adheres to Wolterstorff's doctrine of analogical predication must grant that musical works themselves are hearable only in an ‘analogical’ sense; and (b) that alternative musical ontologies are able to (...)
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  18. The Thin Red Line.David Davies (ed.) - 2008 - Routledge.
    The Thin Red Line is the third feature-length film from acclaimed director Terrence Malick, set during the struggle between American and Japanese forces for Guadalcanal in the South Pacific during World War Two. It is a powerful, enigmatic and complex film that raises important philosophical questions, ranging from the existential and phenomenological to the artistic and technical. This is the first collection dedicated to exploring the philosophical aspects of Malick’s film. Opening with a helpful introduction that places the film in (...)
     
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  19.  14
    Art Historical Explanation Of Paintings And The Need For An Aesthetics Of Agency.Daniel Davies - 2004 - Postgraduate Journal of Aesthetics 1 (3):86-98.
    Why should a person, and in the context of this conference particularly an art historian, take seriously the notion of the aesthetic, its discovery and/or rediscovery? Aesthetics might after all be considered at best something of a distraction from bread and butter historical and sociological analysis, and at worst entirely incompatible with it. Pursuing the line further it might be urged that, since on the one hand aesthetics is about 'how things appear'—i.e. is subject to individual predilection, taste and feeling—and (...)
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  20.  55
    Putnam’s Brain-Teaser.David Davies - 1995 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 25 (2):203--27.
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  21.  87
    A Priori Concepts.D. Davies - 1934 - Analysis 2 (1-2):20-23.
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  22.  23
    Multiple Instances and Multiple 'Instances'.D. Davies - 2010 - British Journal of Aesthetics 50 (4):411-426.
    The distinction between singular and multiple artworks is usually drawn modally in terms of the notion of an ‘instance’ of a work. Singular works, it is claimed, can only have a single instance, whereas multiple works allow of more than one instance. But this is enlightening only if we have a clear idea of what is meant by an ‘instance’. I argue that there are two different notions of a work's ‘instances’ in play in the literature – what I term (...)
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  23. Susan Sontag, Diane Arbus and the Ethical Dimensions of Photography.David Davies - 2008 - In Garry Hagberg (ed.), Art and Ethical Criticism. Blackwell.
     
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  24. Fictional Truth and Fictional Authors.David Davies - 1996 - British Journal of Aesthetics 36 (1):43-55.
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  25.  44
    Relativism Refuted. Harvey Siegel.David Davies - 1990 - Philosophy of Science 57 (3):537-539.
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  26. Fiction.David Davies - 2001 - In Berys Nigel Gaut & Dominic Lopes (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Aesthetics. Routledge.
     
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  27.  33
    Medium in Art.David Davies - 2003 - In Jerrold Levinson (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Aesthetics. Oxford University Press. pp. 181.
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  28.  2
    Making Sense of ‘Popular Art’.David Davies - 2019 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 19 (2):193-215.
    The aims of this paper are twofold: first, to identify a sense of ‘popular art’ in which the question, ‘can there be popular art?’ is interesting and the answer to this question is not obvious; second, to propose and defend a challenging but attractive answer to this question: challenging in that it draws some distinctions we might not initially be inclined to draw, and attractive in offering a productive way of thinking about the ontology, epistemology, and axiology of the kinds (...)
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  29. Telling Pictures : The Place of Narrative in Late Modern 'Visual Art'.David Davies - 2007 - In Peter Goldie & Elisabeth Schellekens (eds.), Philosophy and Conceptual Art. Oxford University Press. pp. 138--156.
     
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  30.  35
    The Dialogue Between Words and Music in the Composition and Comprehension of Song.David Davies - 2013 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 71 (1):13-22.
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  31.  53
    On Gauging Attitudes.David Davies - 1998 - Philosophical Studies 90 (2):129-154.
  32. New Books. [REVIEW]W. J. H. Sprott, F. C. S. Schiller, H. B. Acton, J. H. Muirhead, James Drever, D. Davies & J. W. Macleod - 1933 - Mind 42 (166):243-259.
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  33. Works and Performances in the Performing Arts.David Davies - 2009 - Philosophy Compass 4 (5):744-755.
    The primary purpose of the performing arts is to prepare and present 'artistic performances', performances that either are themselves the appreciative focuses of works of art or are instances of other things that are works of art. In the latter case, we have performances of what may be termed 'performed works', as is generally taken to be so with performances of classical music and traditional theatrical performances. In the former case, we have what may be termed 'performance-works', as, for example, (...)
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  34. How Not to Outsmart the Anti-Realist.David Davies - 1987 - Analysis 47 (1):1 - 8.
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  35.  57
    Précis of Art as Performance.David Davies - 2005 - Acta Analytica 20 (4):3-9.
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  36.  55
    McAllister's Aesthetics in Science: A Critical Notice.David Davies - 1998 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 12 (1):25 – 32.
    In Beauty and Revolution in Science, James McAllister argues that a sophisticated rationalist image of science can accommodate two prominent features of actual scientific practice, namely, appeals to “aesthetic” criteria in theory choice, and the occurrence of scientific “revolutions”. The aesthetic criteria to which scientists appeal are, he maintains, inductively grounded in the empirical record of competing theories, and scientific revolutions involve changes in aestheic criteria bu continuity in empirical criteria of theory choice. I raise difficulties for McAllister's account concerning: (...)
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  37. Why One Shouldn’T Make an Example of a Brain in a Vat.David Davies - 1997 - Analysis 57 (1):51–59.
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  38.  74
    How Sceptical is Kripke's 'Sceptical Solution'?David Davies - 1998 - Philosophia 26 (1-2):119-140.
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  39. Artistic Intentions and the Ontology of Art.David Davies - 1999 - British Journal of Aesthetics 39 (2):148-162.
  40.  80
    New Books. [REVIEW]W. J. H. Sprott, F. C. S. Schiller, James Drever, A. E. Taylor, P. Leon, M. Black, J. Wisdom, R. Rhees, D. Davies, J. O. Wisdom, Arthur Waley, A. C. Ewing, H. B. Acton & John Laird - 1935 - Mind 44 (175):377-413.
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  41.  41
    Explanatory Disunities and the Unity of Science.David Davies - 1996 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 10 (1):5 – 21.
    Abstract According to John Dupré, the metaphysics underpinning modern science posits a deterministic, fully law?governed and potentially fully intelligible structure that pervades the entire universe. To reject such a metaphysical framework for science is to subscribe to ?the disorder of things?, and the latter, according to Dupré, entails the impossibility of a unified science. Dupré's argument rests crucially upon purported disunities evident in the explanatory practices of science. I critically examine the implied project of drawing metaphysical conclusions from epistemological premisses (...)
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  42.  3
    Artistic Crimes and Misdemeanours.David Davies - forthcoming - British Journal of Aesthetics:ayz012.
    Denis Dutton claimed that, to grasp why it matters to the artistic value of a painting like The Disciples at Emmaus that it was painted by van Meegeren in the first half of the twentieth century rather than by Vermeer in the seventeenth century, we need to locate what van Meegeren did in a wider class of ‘artistic crimes’ involving ‘misrepresented artistic performances’. I begin by clarifying how the notions of ‘artistic performance’ and ‘misrepresentation’ are to be understood in the (...)
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  43.  1
    Putnam’s Brain-Teaser.David Davies - 1995 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 25 (2):203-227.
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  44.  92
    Horwich on 'Semantic' and 'Metaphysical' Realism.David Davies - 1987 - Philosophy of Science 54 (4):539-557.
    Horwich argues that we should reject metaphysical realism, but that we can preserve semantic realism by adhering to a redundancy theory of truth and a confirmationist account of linguistic understanding. But the latter will give us semantic realism only if it allows that the truth-values of sentences may transcend our recognitional capacities, and this is possible only insofar as we covertly reintroduce metaphysical realism. In spite of its intuitive appeal, we should not endorse semantic realism, but this need not bear (...)
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  45.  59
    On the Very Idea of ‘Outsider Art’.David Davies - 2009 - British Journal of Aesthetics 49 (1):25-41.
    There has been little serious philosophical reflection on whether, and in virtue of satisfying what conditions, ‘Outsider Art’ is art, as is standardly assumed. I critically examine a number of responses to this question implicit in curatorial practice and the critical literature. I argue that none of these responses carries conviction, and propose, on the basis of broader considerations in the philosophy of art, that the arthood of ‘Outsider’ pieces must be settled by reference to their individual provenance. This supports (...)
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  46.  20
    First Page Preview.James W. McAllister, Lars Bergström, James Robert Brown, Martin Carrier, Nancy Cartwright, Jiwei Ci, David Davies, Catherine Elgin, Márta Fehér & Michel Ghins - 2010 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 24 (4).
  47.  84
    Dennett’s Stance on Intentional Realism.David Davies - 1995 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 33 (3):299-312.
  48.  22
    A Traveller's Guide To Putnam's “Narrow Path”. [REVIEW]David Davies - 1996 - Dialogue 35 (1):117-146.
    It is now over 15 years since Hilary Putnam first urged that we take the “narrow path” of internal realism as a way of navigating between “the swamps of metaphysics and the quicksands of cultural relativism and historicism”. In the opening lines of the Preface to Realism with a Human Face, a collection of Putnam's recent papers edited by James Conant, Putnam reaffirms his allegiance to this narrow path, unmoved by Realist murmurings from the swamps and laconic Rortian suggestions that (...)
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  49.  26
    Scruton on the Inscrutability of Photographs.D. Davies - 2009 - British Journal of Aesthetics 49 (4):341-355.
    A long-standing objection to the artistic pretensions of photography is that, because of the ‘causal’ nature of the process whereby a photographic image is produced, the formative intelligence of the photographer does not play a significant role in the generation of the image. Only where we can see such intelligence manifested in an image, it is claimed, can we legitimately take the representational content of the image to be a proper subject of artistic interest. I examine the most sophisticated modern (...)
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  50.  32
    Rehearsal and Hamilton’s “Ingredients Model” of Theatrical Performance.David Davies - 2009 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 43 (3):pp. 23-36.
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