Results for 'D. E. O'Regan'

200 found
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  1.  13
    Rhetoric, Comedy, and the Violence of Language in Aristophanes' Clouds.Alan H. Sommerstein & D. E. O'Regan - 1994 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 114:190-191.
  2. The 'Feel'of Seeing:: An Interview with J. Kevin O'Regan.J. Kevin O'Regan - 2001 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 5 (6):278-279.
  3. A Way to Naturalize Phenomenology.E. Myin & J. K. O'Regan - 2002 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 9 (1):27-46.
  4. Perceptual Consciousness, Access to Modality and Skill Theories. A Way to Naturalize Phenomenology? E. Myin & J. O'regan - 2002 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 9 (1):27-46.
    We address the thesis recently proposed by Andy Clark, that skill-mediated access to modality implies phenomenal feel. We agree that a skill theory of perception does indeed offer the possibility of a satisfactory account of the feel of perception, but we claim that this is not only through explanation of access to modality but also because skill actually provides access to perceptual property in general. We illustrate and substantiate our claims by reference to the recently proposed 'sensorimotor contingency' theory of (...)
     
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  5.  8
    Stephen Joseph O'Leary and the Return of Correlationist Theology.Cyril O'Regan - 2019 - Modern Theology 35 (2):382-392.
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  6. On Failures to Detect Changes in Scenes Across Brief Interruptions.Ronald A. Rensink, Kevin J. O'Regan & James J. Clark - 2000 - Visual Cognition 7 (1-3):127-145.
    When brief blank fields are placed between alternating displays of an original and a modified scene, a striking failure of perception is induced: the changes become extremely difficult to notice, even when they are large, presented repeatedly, and the observer expects them to occur (Rensink, O'Regan, & Clark, 1997). To determine the mechanisms behind this induced "change blindness", four experiments examine its dependence on initial preview and on the nature of the interruptions used. Results support the proposal that representations (...)
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  7.  19
    For Peer Review.J. Kevin O'Regan - unknown
    Call u the triplet of cone quantum catch for the light that is incident on a surface, and v the triplet of cone quantum catch for the light that is reflected off that surface. Philipona & O'Regan (2006) present results from numerical calculations showing that: 1. each surface can be associated with a 3 by 3 matrix A such that the relation v = A u to a very high degree of accuracy for any natural illuminant, 2. the vast (...)
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  8. A Sensorimotor Account of Vision and Visual Consciousness.J. Kevin O'Regan & Alva Noë - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):883-917.
    Many current neurophysiological, psychophysical, and psychological approaches to vision rest on the idea that when we see, the brain produces an internal representation of the world. The activation of this internal representation is assumed to give rise to the experience of seeing. The problem with this kind of approach is that it leaves unexplained how the existence of such a detailed internal representation might produce visual consciousness. An alternative proposal is made here. We propose that seeing is a way of (...)
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  9. To See or Not to See: The Need for Attention to Perceive Changes in Scenes.Ronald A. Rensink, J. Kevin O'Regan & James J. Clark - 1997 - Psychological Science 8:368-373.
    Methods. We employed a "flicker" technique, in which an original and a modified image (each of duration 240 ms) continually alternated, with a blank field (duration 80 ms) between each display. Images were all of real-world scenes. One of three kinds of change (appearance/disappearance, color, or translation) was made to an object or region in each scene. Changes were large and easily seen under normal conditions. Subjects viewed the flicker display, and pressed a key when they noticed the change.
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  10.  70
    Why Red Doesn't Sound Like a Bell: Understanding the Feel of Consciousness.J. K. O'Regan - 2011 - Oxford University Press.
    The catastrophe of the eye -- A new view of seeing -- Applying the new view of seeing -- The illusion of seeing everything -- Some contentious points -- Towards consciousness -- Types of consciousness -- Phenomenal consciousness, raw feel, and why they're hard -- Squeeze a sponge, drive a porsche : a sensorimotor account of feel -- Consciously experiencing a feel -- The sensorimotor approach to color -- Sensory substitution -- The localization of touch -- The phenomenality plot -- (...)
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  11. What It is Like to See: A Sensorimotor Theory of Perceptual Experience.J. Kevin O'Regan - 2001 - Synthese 129 (1):79-103.
    The paper proposes a way of bridging the gapbetween physical processes in the brain and the ''''felt''''aspect of sensory experience. The approach is based onthe idea that experience is not generated by brainprocesses themselves, but rather is constituted by theway these brain processes enable a particular form of''''give-and-take'''' between the perceiver and theenvironment. From this starting-point we are able tocharacterize the phenomenological differences betweenthe different sensory modalities in a more principledway than has been done in the past. We are also (...)
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  12. Solving the "Real" Mysteries of Visual Perception: The World as an Outside Memory.Kevin J. O'Regan - 1992 - Canadian Journal of Psychology 46:461-88.
  13.  32
    Perceptual Consciousness, Access to Modality and Skill Theories: A Way to Naturalize Phenomenology?Erik Myin & J. Kevin O'Regan - 2002 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 9 (1):27-45.
    We address the thesis recently proposed by Andy Clark, that skill-mediated access to modality implies phenomenal feel. We agree that a skill theory of perception does indeed offer the possibility of a satisfactory account of the feel of perception, but we claim that this is not only through explanation of access to modality but also because skill actually provides access to perceptual property in general. We illustrate and substantiate our claims by reference to the recently proposed 'sensorimotor contingency' theory of (...)
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  14.  87
    Picture Changes During Blinks: Looking Without Seeing and Seeing Without Looking.J. Kevin O'Regan, H. Deubel, James J. Clark & R. Rensink - 2000 - Visual Cognition 7:191-211.
    Observers inspected normal, high quality color displays of everyday visual scenes while their eye movements were recorded. A large display change occurred each time an eye blink occurred. Display changes could either involve "Central Interest" or "Marginal Interest" locations, as determined from descriptions obtained from independent judges in a prior pilot experiment. Visual salience, as determined by luminance, color, and position of the Central and Marginal interest changes were equalized.
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  15.  47
    Change Blindness as a Result of Mudsplashes.Kevin J. O'Regan, Ronald A. Rensink & James J. Clark - 1999 - Nature 398 (6722):34-34.
  16.  56
    From a Sensorimotor Account of Perception to an Interactive Approach to Psychopathology.Erik Myin, Kevin O'Regan & Inez Myin-Germeys - 2015 - In Rocco J. Gennaro (ed.), Disturbed Consciousness. MIT Press.
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  17. Perception, Attention, and the Grand Illusion.Alva Noë & Kevin J. O'Regan - 2000 - PSYCHE: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Research On Consciousness 6.
    This paper looks at two puzzles raised by the phenomenon of inattentional blindness. First, how can we see at all if, in order to see, we must first perceptually attend to that which we see? Second, if attention is required for perception, why does it seem to us as if we are perceptually aware of the whole detailed visual field when it is quite clear that we do not attend to all that detail? We offer a general framework for thinking (...)
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  18. On the Brain-Basis of Visual Consciousness: A Sensorimotor Account.Alva Noë & J. Kevin O'Regan - 2002 - In A. Noe & E. Thompson (eds.), Vision and Mind: Selected Readings in the Philosophy of Perception. MIT Press. pp. 567--598.
  19. A Sensorimotor Account of Vision and Visual Consciousness-Authors' Response-Acting Out Our Sensory Experience.J. Kevin O'Regan & A. Noe - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):1011.
  20.  36
    Humour Production May Enhance Observational Learning of a New Tool-Use Action in 18-Month-Old Infants.Rana Esseily, Lauriane Rat-Fischer, Eszter Somogyi, Kevin John O'Regan & Jacqueline Fagard - 2016 - Cognition and Emotion 30 (4).
  21.  56
    Skill, Corporality and Alerting Capacity in an Account of Sensory Consciousness.J. Kevin O'Regan, Erik Myin & Alva Noë - 2006 - In Steven Laureys (ed.), Boundaries of Consciousness. Elsevier.
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  22.  68
    Acting Out Our Sensory Experience.J. Kevin O'Regan & Alva Noë - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):1011-1021.
    The most important clarification we bring in our reply to commentators concerns the problem of the “explanatory gap”: that is, the gulf that separates physical processes in the brain from the experienced quality of sensations. By adding two concepts (bodiliness and grabbiness) that were not stressed in the target article, we strengthen our claim and clarify why we think we have solved the explanatory gap problem, – not by dismissing qualia, but, on the contrary, by explaining why sensations have a (...)
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  23.  11
    The Emergence of Use of a Rake-Like Tool: A Longitudinal Study in Human Infants.Jacqueline Fagard, Lauriane Rat-Fischer & J. Kevin O'Regan - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  24. Induced Dependence of Colour Perception on Eye-Movements.A. Bompas & J. K. O'Regan - 2004 - In Robert Schwartz (ed.), Perception. Malden Ma: Blackwell. pp. 17-18.
  25.  46
    Experience is Not Something We Feel but Something We Do: A Principled Way of Explaining Sensory Phenomenology, with Change Blindness and Other Empirical Consequences.J. Kevin O'Regan - unknown
    Any theory of experience which postulates that brain mechanisms generate "raw feel" encounters the impassable "explanatory gap" separating physics from phenomenology.
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  26.  21
    Žižek's Meontology: An Inflected Hegel and the Possibility of Theology.Cyril O'Regan - 2014 - Modern Theology 30 (4):600-611.
  27.  21
    Phenomenal Consciousness Lite: No Thanks!J. Kevin O'Regan & Erik Myin - 2007 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (5-6):520-521.
    The target article appeals to recent empirical data to support the idea that there is more to phenomenality than is available to access consciousness. However, this claim is based on an unwarranted assumption, namely, that some kind of cortical processing must be phenomenal. The article also considerably weakens Block's original distinction between a truly nonfunctional phenomenal consciousness and a functional access consciousness. The new form of phenomenal consciousness seems to be a poor-man's cognitive access.
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  28.  5
    Paulo Diego Bubbio. God and the Self in Hegel: Beyond Subjectivism. Albany NY: SUNY Press, 2017. ISBN 978-1-4384-6525-8 . ISBN 978-1-4384-6524-1 . Pp. 228. $85.00/$22.95. [REVIEW]Cyril O'Regan - forthcoming - Hegel Bulletin:1-4.
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  29.  75
    Toward an Analytic Phenomenology: The Concepts of "Bodiliness" and "Grabbiness".Kevin J. O'Regan, Erik Myin & No - 2001 - In A. Carsetti (ed.), Seeing and Thinking. Reflections on Kanizsa's Studies in Visual Cognition. Kluwer Academic Publishers.
    In this paper, we present an account of phenomenal con- sciousness. Phenomenal consciousness is experience, and the _problem _of phenomenal consciousness is to explain how physical processes.
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  30.  12
    Andrew Shanks Hegel and Religious Faith: Divided Brain, Atoning Spirit. New York: T & T Clark, 2011. ISBN 978-0-567-53230-5. Pp. 175. [REVIEW]Cyril O'Regan - 2014 - Hegel Bulletin 35 (1):148-151.
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  31.  34
    Skill, Corporality and Alerting Capacity in an Account of Sensory Consciousness.Kevin J. O'Regan - manuscript
  32.  11
    Ferdinand Christian Baur and the History of Early Christianity, Edited by BaupiessMartin, LandmesserChristof, and LincicumDavid ; Translated by HodgsonPeter C. And BrownRobert F. , Xv + 416 Pp. [REVIEW]Cyril O'Regan - 2019 - Modern Theology 35 (1):187-190.
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  33.  10
    Balthasar and the Eclipse of Nietzsche.Cyril O'Regan - forthcoming - Modern Theology.
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  34.  15
    Letter Legibility and Visual Word Recognition.J. Kevin O'Regan - unknown
    Word recognition performance varies systematically as a function of where the eyes fixate in the word. Performance is maximal with the eye slightly left of the center of the word, and decreases drastically to both sides of this 'Optimal Viewing Position'. While manipulations of lexical factors have only marginal effects on this phenomenon, previous studies have pointed to a relation between the viewing position effect and letter legibility: When letter legibility drops, the viewing position effect becomes more exaggerated. To further (...)
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  35.  17
    Robert Williams’s Hegelian God.Cyril O'Regan - 2017 - The Owl of Minerva 49 (1):107-135.
    This essay focuses on the way Williams elaborates, defends, and recommends Hegel’s revision of Christianity, which makes possible a Christianity free from the defects of its pre-modern form without collapsing into atheism and humanism. The essay begins by examining the development of Williams’s case in Hegel on the Proofs and Personhood of God and in Tragedy, Recognition, and the Death of God. This examination shows that Williams uses Hegel’s critique of pre-modern Christianity to demonstrate that modernity, in which discourse, practices, (...)
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  36.  95
    Explaining What People Say About Sensory Qualia.J. Kevin O'Regan - 2010 - In N. Gangopadhay, M. Madary & F. Spicer (eds.), Perception, Action, and Consciousness. Oxford University Press. pp. 31--50.
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  37.  21
    Balthasar: Between TÜbingen and Postmodernity.Cyril O'Regan - 1998 - Modern Theology 14 (3):325-353.
  38.  12
    The World as an Outside Iconic Memory – No Strong Internal Metric Means No Problem of Visual Stability.J. Kevin O'Regan - 1994 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (2):270-271.
  39.  19
    The ‘Mosaic Habitat’ Concept in Human Evolution: Past and Present.Sally C. Reynolds, David M. Wilkinson, Christopher G. Marston & Hannah J. O'Regan - 2015 - Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa 70 (1):57-69.
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  40.  3
    How the Sensorimotor Approach to Consciousness Bridges Both Comparative and Absolute Explanatory Gaps: And Some Refinements of the Theory.J. K. O'Regan - 2016 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 23 (5-6):39-65.
    The problem of understanding how physical processes in the brain could give rise to consciousness has been identified with the 'comparative explanatory gap', the problem of explaining why different experiences have the differing qualities they do, and the 'absolute explanatory gap', the problem of explaining why anything can be conscious at all. The main innovation of the sensorimotor theory is that it provides a very appealing way of closing the comparative gap by postulating that the quality of experiences corresponds to (...)
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  41.  27
    The ‘Feel’ of Seeing.J. Kevin O'Regan - 2001 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 5 (6):278-279.
  42.  12
    Balthasar on the Spiritual Senses: Perceiving Splendour, by Mark McInroy , Xii + 217 Pp.Cyril O'Regan - 2016 - Modern Theology 32 (4):683-686.
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  43.  19
    Girard and the Spaces of Apocalyptic.Cyril O'regan - 2012 - Modern Theology 28 (1):112-140.
    This article examines the apocalyptic turn evident in René Girard's Battling to the End , which puts an exclamation point on what has been an increasing tendency in Girard's thought. Its general aim is to describe Girard's particular form of biblical apocalyptic. Toward that end, it unfolds Girard's arguments against other apocalyptic contenders, including Hegel and Heidegger; it opens up a space of conversation with other forms of apocalyptic thought ; and in and through Girard's affirmation of Benedict XVI, raises (...)
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  44. Von Balthasar and Thick Retrieval: Post-Chalcedonian Symphonic Theology.Cyril O'regan - 1996 - Gregorianum 77 (2):227-260.
    L'A. étudie l'usage que Balthasar fait de la pensée grecque post-chalcédonienne. Le théologien allemand attire l'attention sur le style symphonique de la pensée grecque, sa concentration christologique et son caractère trinitaire. La première partie de ce travail est consacrée aux problèmes que soulève l'extension de l'usage de la pensée grecque post-chalcédonienne : peut-on mettre sur le même plan Maxime le Confesseur et le Pseudo-Denys ? L'A. montre ensuite que, si pour Balthasar le mérite de cette théologie tient à sa propension (...)
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  45.  22
    John Henry Newman and the Argument of Holiness.Cyril O'Regan - 2012 - Newman Studies Journal 9 (1):52-74.
    This essay examines Newman’s life-long campaign against the errors of liberal religion, particularly its “anti-holiness” principle that rejects the Christian commitment to the pursuit of sanctity. In both his Anglican and Roman Catholic writings, Newman attacked the “anti-holiness” principle’s underlying presuppositions, particularly its naturalistic anthropology, its “anthropocentric horizon of discourse,” its rejection of ascetic discipline in religious formation, and its tendency to accept uncritically what is intellectually novel.
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  46.  30
    Change Blindness.J. Kevin O'Regan - 2003 - In L. Nadel (ed.), Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science. Nature Publishing Group.
  47.  18
    Wrestling with Angels: Conversations in Modern Theology – By Rowan Williams.Cyril O'Regan - 2010 - Modern Theology 26 (1):149-152.
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  48.  16
    Theology and the Drama of History – By Ben Quash.Cyril O'Regan - 2007 - Modern Theology 23 (2):293-296.
  49.  25
    How to Build a Robot That Feels.J. Kevin O'Regan - unknown
    Overview. Consciousness is often considered to have a "hard" part and a not-so-hard part. With the help of work in artificial intelligence and more recently in embodied robotics, there is hope that we shall be able solve the not-so-hard part and make artificial agents that understand their environment, communicate with their friends, and most importantly, have a notion of "self" and "others". But will such agents feel anything? Building the feel into the agent will be the "hard" part.
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  50.  25
    The Poetics of Ethos.Cyril O'regan - 2001 - Ethical Perspectives 8 (4):272-306.
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