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David Efird
University of York
  1.  70
    Shattered Faith: The Social Epistemology of Deconversion by Spiritually Violent Religious Trauma.David Efird, Joshua Cockayne & Jack Warman - 2020 - In Michelle Panchuk & Michael C. Rea (eds.), Voices from the Edge: Centering Marginalized Perspectives in Analytic Theology.
    In this chapter, we argue that it’s possible to lose your faith in God by the actions of other people. In particular, we argue that spiritually violent religious trauma, where religious texts are used to shame a person into thinking themselves unworthy of God’s love, can cause a person to stop engaging in activities that sustain their faith in God, such as engaging in the worship of God. To do this, we provide an analysis of faith, worship, and love on (...)
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  2.  43
    Common Worship.Joshua Cockayne & David Efird - 2018 - Faith and Philosophy 35 (3):299-325.
    People of faith, particularly in the Judeo-Christian tradition, worship corporately at least as often, if not more so, than they do individually. Why do they do this? There are, of course, many reasons, some having to do with personal preference and others having to do with the theology of worship. But, in this paper, we explore one reason, a philosophical reason, which, despite recent work on the philosophy of liturgy, has gone underappreciated. In particular, we argue that corporate worship enables (...)
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  3. What is the Principle of Recombination?David Efird & Tom Stoneham - 2008 - Dialectica 62 (4):483-494.
    In this paper, we give a precise characterization of the principle of recombination and argue that it need not be subject to any restrictions.
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  4. Critical Review of Eleonore Stump's Wandering in Darkness: Narrative and the Problem of Suffering.David Efird & David Worsley - 2015 - Philosophical Quarterly 65 (260):547-558.
  5.  26
    Stages of Life: A New Metaphysics of Conceptionism.David Efird & Stephen Holland - 2019 - Bioethics 33 (4):529-535.
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  6.  40
    What an Apophaticist Can Know.David Efird & David Worsley - 2017 - Philosophy and Theology 29 (2):205-219.
    For an apophatic theologian, the doctrines of divine ineffability and of the beatific vision seem, on first glance, to contradict each other. If God is beyond knowledge how can we come to know Him, fully and completely? To resolve this problem, we argue that, if there are at least two qualitatively different kinds of knowledge, namely, propositional knowledge and knowledge of persons, then there are at least two qualitatively different kinds of ineffability, namely, propositional ineffability and what we will call (...)
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  7. Genuine Modal Realism and the Empty World.David Efird & Tom Stoneham - 2005 - European Journal of Analytic Philosophy 1 (1):21-37.
    We argue that genuine modal realism can be extended, rather than modified, so as to allow for the possibility of nothing concrete, a possibility we term ‘metaphysical nihilism’. The issue should be important to the genuine modal realist because, not only is metaphysical nihilism itself intuitively plausible, but also it is supported by an argument with pre-theoretically credible premises, namely, the subtraction argument. Given the soundness of the subtraction argument, we show that there are two ways that the genuine modal (...)
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  8.  65
    Experiencing the Real Presence of Christ in the Eucharist.Joshua Cockayne, David Efird, Gordon Haynes, Daniel Molto, Richard Tamburro, Jack Warman & August Ludwigs - 2017 - Journal of Analytic Theology 5:175-196.
    We present a new understanding of Christ’s real presence in the Eucharist on the model of Stump’s account of God’s omnipresence and Green and Quan’s account of experiencing God in Scripture. On this understanding, Christ is derivatively, rather than fundamentally, located in the consecrated bread and wine, such that Christ is present to the believer through the consecrated bread and wine, thereby making available to the believer a second-person experience of Christ, where the consecrated bread and wine are the way (...)
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  9. Is Metaphysical Nihilism Interesting?David Efird & Tom Stoneham - 2009 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 90 (2):210-231.
    Suppose nothing exists. Then it is true that nothing exists. What makes that true? Nothing! So it seems that if nothing existed, then the principle that every truth is made true by something (the truthmaker principle) would be false. So if it is possible that nothing exists, a claim often called 'metaphysical nihilism', then the truthmaker principle is not necessary. This paper explores various ways to resolve this conflict without restricting metaphysical nihilism in such a way that it would become (...)
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  10.  98
    Combinatorialism and the Possibility of Nothing.David Efird & Tom Stoneham - 2006 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 84 (2):269 – 280.
    We argue that Armstrong's Combinatorialism allows for the possibility of nothing by giving a Combinatorial account of the empty world and show that such an account is consistent with the ontological and conceptual aims of the theory. We then suggest that the Combinatorialist should allow for this possibility given some methodological considerations. Consequently, rather than being 'spoils for the victor', as Armstrong maintains, deciding whether there might have been nothing helps to determine which metaphysics of modality is to be preferred.
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  11.  8
    Common Worship.Joshua Cockayne & David Efird - 2018 - Faith and Philosophy 35 (3):299-325.
    People of faith, particularly in the Judeo-Christian tradition, worship corporately at least as often, if not more so, than they do individually. Why do they do this? There are, of course, many reasons, some having to do with personal preference and others having to do with the theology of worship. But, in this paper, we explore one reason, a philosophical reason, which, despite recent work on the philosophy of liturgy, has gone underappreciated. In particular, we argue that corporate worship enables (...)
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  12.  89
    Justifying Metaphysical Nihilism: A Response to Cameron.David Efird & Tom Stoneham - 2009 - Philosophical Quarterly 59 (234):132-137.
    Ross Cameron charges the subtraction argument for metaphysical nihilism with equivocation: each premise is plausible only under different interpretations of 'concrete'. This charge is ungrounded; the argument is both valid and supported by basic modal intuitions.
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  13.  26
    Experiencing Christian Art.David Efird & Daniel Gustafsson - 2015 - Religious Studies 51 (3):431-439.
    In this article, we argue that a secularist cannot experience Christian art in the same way that a Christian can. To defend this claim, we argue that Christian faith is best conceived as an engagement with God, such that coming to have faith is a transformative, second-person experience where a person comes to know what it is like to be loved by God and that Christian art is best conceived as iconic, such that it is an occasion for, and a (...)
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  14. Is Timothy Williamson a Necessary Existent?David Efird - 2010 - In Bob Hale & Aviv Hoffmann (eds.), Modality: Metaphysics, Logic, and Epistemology. Oxford University Press.
    Timothy Williamson (2002) has offered an argument for the claim that, necessarily, he exists, that is, that he is a necessary existent.1 Though this argument has attracted a great deal of attention (e.g., Rumfitt 2003 and Wiggins 2003), I present a new argument for the same conclusion which reveals a new way of denying the soundness of Williamson’s argument, one which denies not only that it is necessary that he exists but also that there are any true necessities about Williamson (...)
     
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  15.  59
    The Subtraction Argument for the Possibility of Free Mass.David Efird & Tom Stoneham - 2010 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 80 (1):50-57.
    Could an object have only mass and no other property? In giving an affirmative answer to this question, Jonathan Schaffer (2003, pp. 136-8) proposes what he calls ‘the subtraction argument’ for ‘the possibility of free mass’. In what follows, we aim to assess the cogency of this argument in comparison with an argument of the same general form which has also been termed a subtraction argument, namely, Thomas Baldwin’s (1996) subtraction argument for metaphysical nihilism, which is the claim that there (...)
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  16.  27
    Divine Action and Operative Grace.David Efird & David Worsley - 2017 - Heythrop Journal 58 (5):771-779.
    Operative grace is generally considered to be a paradigm example of special divine action. In this paper, we suggest one reason to think operative grace might be consistent with general divine action alone. On our view, then, a deist can consistently believe in a doctrine of saving faith.
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  17.  54
    Non-Evidential Believing and Permissivism About Evidence: A Reply to Dan-Johan Eklund.Joshua Cockayne, David Efird, Daniel Molto, Richard Tamburro & Jack Warman - 2015 - Religious Studies (1):1-9.
    In response to John Bishop's (2007) account of passionally caused believing, Dan-Johan Eklund (2014) argues that conscious non-evidential believing is (conceptually) impossible, that is, it's (conceptually) impossible consciously to believe that p whilst acknowledging that the relevant evidence doesn't support p's being true, for it conflicts with belief being a truth-oriented attitude, or so he argues. In this article, we present Eklund's case against Bishop's account of passionally caused believing, and we argue that it's unpersuasive, at least to those who (...)
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  18. Truthmakers and Possible Worlds.David Efird & Tom Stoneham - 2005 - Analysis 65 (4):290–294.
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  19.  22
    The Subtraction Argument for the Possibility of Free Mass.David Efird & Tom Stoneham - 2010 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 80 (1):50-57.
    Jonathan Schaffer has recently argued that there can be objects having only mass. We show that his argument is either invalid or question begging.
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  20.  75
    Anna Marmodoro and Jonathan Hill , The Metaphysics of the Incarnation, Oxford University Press, 2011.David Efird - 2013 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 5 (2):185-189.
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  21.  42
    Believing by Faith: An Essay in the Epistemology and Ethics of Religious Belief - by John Bishop. [REVIEW]David Efird - 2008 - Philosophical Books 49 (3):283-285.
  22.  11
    Believing By Faith: An Essay in the Epistemology and Ethics of Religious Belief ‐ By John Bishop.David Efird - 2008 - Philosophical Books 49 (3):283-285.
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  23. Divine Command Theory and the Semantics of Quantified Modal Logic.David Efird - 2009 - In Yujin Nagasawa & Erik J. Wielenberg (eds.), New Waves in Philosophy of Religion. Palgrave-Macmillan. pp. 91.
    I offer a series of axiomatic formalizations of Divine Command Theory motivated by certain methodological considerations. Given these considerations, I present what I take to be the best axiomatization of Divine Command Theory, an axiomatization which requires a non-standardsemantics for quantified modal logic.
     
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  24.  49
    God and the Ethics of Belief: New Essays in Philosophy of Religion - Edited by Andrew Dole and Andrew Chignell.David Efird - 2008 - Philosophical Books 49 (1):93-94.
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  25.  77
    Make/Believing the World(S): Toward a Christian Ontological Pluralism * By Mark S. McLeod-Harrison.D. Efird - 2011 - Analysis 71 (2):404-406.
    ‘We believe in one God, the Father, the Almighty, maker of heaven and earth’, so Christians confess when they recite the Nicene Creed. Now if the argument of Mark S. McLeod-Harrison’s Make/Believing the World: Toward a Christian Ontological Pluralism is correct, God is not alone in that task. We human beings are makers of heaven and earth, too, in the sense that what exists is as it is because our minds have made it so, which is a kind of noetic (...)
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  26.  29
    Philosophical and Theological Essays on the Trinity, Edited by Thomas McCall and Michael C. Rea.D. Efird - 2012 - Mind 121 (481):191-195.
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  27.  15
    Polarized Yet Warranted Christian Belief.David Efird - 2012 - In Yujin Nagasawa (ed.), Scientific Approaches to the Philosophy of Religion. Palgrave-Macmillan. pp. 224.
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  28. Reason, Metaphysics, and Mind: New Essays on the Philosophy of Alvin Plantinga.D. Efird - 2013 - Analysis 73 (2):398-400.
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  29.  24
    Review of E. J. Lowe, A. Rami (Eds.), Truth and Truth-Making[REVIEW]David Efird - 2009 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (8).
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  30.  40
    Some Later Medieval Theories of the Eucharist: Thomas Aquinas, Giles of Rome, Duns Scotus, and William Ockham, by Marilyn McCord Adams.D. Efird - 2012 - Mind 121 (482):467-470.
  31. The Resurrection of the Minority Body: Physical Disability in the Life of Heaven.David Efird - 2019 - In Blake Hereth & Kevin Timpe (eds.), Philosophy of Religion for All.
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  32. Unfenced Existence the Logic and Metaphysics of Necessary Beings.David Efird - 2002
     
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  33.  11
    William J. Abraham Divine Agency and Divine Action: Exploring and Evaluating the Debate, I. . Pp. 256. £65.00 . ISBN 978 0 19 878650 4.William J. Abraham Divine Agency and Divine Action: Soundings in the Christian Tradition, II. . Pp. 256. £65.00 . ISBN 978 0 19 878651 1. [REVIEW]David Efird - forthcoming - Religious Studies:1-5.
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  34.  88
    After Pascal’s Wager: On Religious Belief, Regulated and Rationally Held.Jack Warman & David Efird - forthcoming - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-18.
    In Pascal’s famous wager, he claims that the seeking non-believer can induce genuine religious belief in herself by joining a religious community and taking part in its rituals. This form of belief regulation is epistemologically puzzling: can we form beliefs in this way, and could such beliefs be rationally held? In the first half of the paper, we explain how the regimen could allow the seeking non-believer to regulate her religious beliefs by intervening on her evidence and epistemic standards. In (...)
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