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  1.  1
    Non Enim Ab Hiis Que Sensus Est Iudicare Sensum: Sensation and Thought in Theaetetus, Plotinus and Proclus.D. Gregory MacIsaac - 2014 - International Journal of the Platonic Tradition 8 (2):192-230.
    I examine the relation between sensation and discursive thought in Plato, Plotinus, and Proclus. In Theaetetus, a soul whose highest faculty was sensation would have no unified experience of the sensible world, lacking universal ideas to give order to the sensible flux. It is implied that such universals are grasped by the soul’s thinking. In Plotinus the soul is not passive when it senses the world, but as the logos of all things it thinks the world through its own forms.Proclus (...)
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  2.  8
    Geometrical First Principles in Proclus’ Commentary on the First Book of Euclid’s Elements.D. Gregory MacIsaac - 2014 - Phronesis 59 (1):44-98.
    In his commentary on Euclid, Proclus says both that the first principle of geometry are self-evident and that they are hypotheses received from the single, highest, unhypothetical science, which is probably dialectic. The implication of this seems to be that a geometer both does and does not know geometrical truths. This dilemma only exists if we assume that Proclus follows Aristotle in his understanding of these terms. This paper shows that this is not the case, and explains what Proclus himself (...)
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  3.  20
    Phantasia Between Soul and Body in Proclus' Euclid Commentary.D. Gregory Macisaac - 2001 - Dionysius 19:125-136.
  4. The Soul and Discursive Reason in the Philosophy of Proclus.D. Gregory Macisaac - 2001 - Dissertation, University of Notre Dame
    In Proclus dianoia is the Soul's thinking activity, through which it makes itself into a divided image of Nous. This dissertation examines various aspects of Procline dianoia. Dianoia's thoughts are logoi, because in the Greek philosophical tradition, logos came to mean a division of a prior unity . Proclus' theory of dianoia rejects induction, and is a conscious development of Plato's theory of anamnesis , because induction is unable to yield a true universal . The source of Soul's logoi is (...)
     
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  5.  45
    (M.) Martijn Proclus on Nature. Philosophy of Nature and its Methods in Proclus' Commentary on Plato's Timaeus. Leiden: Brill, 2010. Pp. X + 360. £105. 978900-4181915. [REVIEW]D. Gregory MacIsaac - 2012 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 132:285-286.
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  6.  19
    Neoplatonism After Derrida.D. Gregory MacIsaac - 2009 - Ancient Philosophy 29 (1):238-240.
  7. Neoplatonism After Derrida: Parallelograms. [REVIEW]D. Gregory Macisaac - 2009 - Ancient Philosophy 29 (1):238-240.
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