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L. S. D. [7]L. D. [7]L. L. D. [4]L. P. D. [1]
Linke D. [1]Lewis D. [1]L. N. D. [1]Leszczyński D. [1]
  1.  4
    Automatic without autonomic responses to familiar faces: Differential components of covert face recognition in a case of Capgras delusion.Hadyn Ellis, Lewis D., B. Michael, Hamdy Moselhy, Young F. & W. Andrew - 2000 - Cognitive Neuropsychiatry 5 (4):255–269.
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  2.  7
    The Plague: A Lay Comment on a Medical Note.L. P. D. - 1954 - Classical Quarterly 4 (3-4):174-.
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  3.  5
    The locked-in syndrome and the behaviorist epistemology of other minds.M. Moskopp Kurthen, Linke D. & Reuter D. B. - 1991 - Theoretical Medicine 12 (March):69-79.
    In this paper, the problem of correct ascriptions of consciousness to patients in neurological intensive care medicine is explored as a special case of the general philosophical other minds problem. It is argued that although clinical ascriptions of consciousness and coma are mostly based on behavioral evidence, a behaviorist epistemology of other minds is not likely to succeed. To illustrate this, the so-called total locked-in syndrome, in which preserved consciousness is combined with a total loss of motor abilities due to (...)
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  4. The role of theories in biological systematics.L. D. - 2001 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 32 (2):221-238.
    The role of scientific theories in classifying plants and animals is traced from Hennig's phylogenetics and the evolutionary taxonomy of Simpson and Mayr, through numerical phenetics, to present-day cladistics. Hennig limited biological classification to sister groups so that this one relation can be expressed unambiguously in classifications. Simpson and Mayr were willing to sacrifice precision in representation in order to include additional features of evolution in the construction of classifications. In order to make classifications more objective, precise and quantitative, numerical (...)
     
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  5.  9
    A Theory of the Good and the Right. [REVIEW]L. S. D. - 1981 - Review of Metaphysics 35 (2):367-369.
    Brandt's purpose is to clarify and help resolve the fundamental issues of moral philosophy by using "non-traditional types of evidence and non-traditional argument." Observing the deficiencies of common approaches to morality that build on alleged linguistic or moral "intuitions", he proposes instead to build on the findings of "contemporary psychology." Despite the promised novelty of Brandt's approach, however, his ultimate substantive findings differ relatively little from those of other contemporary Anglo-American writers on moral philosophy such as Rawls, and his method (...)
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  6. Essays in Honor of Jacob Klein. [REVIEW]L. L. D. - 1979 - Review of Metaphysics 33 (1):185-188.
    Jacob Klein used to say that he learned something from Heidegger "that what another man had thought and written might actually and genuinely be understood". This characteristically understated view means, not only that intersubjectivity is possible, but more, that we have access to our past. Objectivity, and thus liberating education, is possible in a world which seems to preclude it. This made for a life of learning and teaching and Saint John’s College, Annapolis. It is thus correct that a festschrift (...)
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  7.  1
    Art and the Religious Experience. [REVIEW]L. D. - 1973 - Review of Metaphysics 27 (1):147-147.
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  8.  2
    Diderot’s Chaotic Order. [REVIEW]L. S. D. - 1974 - Review of Metaphysics 28 (2):342-343.
    The author of this study aims to provide a synthetic survey of Diderot’s philosophy, as distinguished from the numerous analytic studies that have been made of particular aspects of the Frenchman’s thought. The central thread uniting Diderot’s various works, Crocker contends, is a view of the universe as comprising simultaneously both order and disorder in an ineluctable tension. In the initial chapter, Crocker outlines this rather loose theme by examining Diderot’s "dynamic" conception of the physical universe and man’s ambiguous relation (...)
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  9.  23
    Discovering the Mind, Goethe, Kant and Hegel. [REVIEW]L. L. D. - 1980 - Review of Metaphysics 34 (2):389-390.
    This first volume of a projected trilogy seeks to initiate a new style of philosophizing—a nonreductive philosophical psychohistory—that sees the work of great thinkers as mirrors of their minds. It is especially instructive to learn, Kaufmann argues, how even the greatest thinkers have "fallen pitifully short" of philosophy’s central function set out by the Delphic prescription "Know Thyself.".
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  10.  10
    Essays in the Freedom of Action. [REVIEW]L. D. - 1973 - Review of Metaphysics 27 (1):130-131.
    This collection of nine previously unpublished papers is a valuable and important addition to current discussions of free action. Each of the essays deserves, and will no doubt get, careful attention, but those by Donald Davidson, D. C. Dennett and David Pears will probably attract most interest. Davidson suggests that freedom to act be construed as a causal power of the agent, and offers in clarification an analysis of "can" in terms of what the agent will do given desires and (...)
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  11.  20
    Equality, Liberty, and Perfectionism. [REVIEW]L. S. D. - 1980 - Review of Metaphysics 34 (2):378-380.
    Vinit Haksar has written a fairly lengthy book in order to establish a rather simple point : that it is impossible to arrive at an adequate account of justice without judging the objective merit of alternative ways of life. The main target of his argument is John Rawls, whose influential A Theory of Justice purports to sever considerations of justice from those of the human good in precisely this way. Haksar’s argument is also intended, however, as a criticism of the (...)
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  12.  10
    Enigmas of Agency. [REVIEW]L. D. - 1973 - Review of Metaphysics 27 (1):163-164.
    These are eleven previously-published essays, revised to varying degrees, on topics central in recent philosophy of action. As with most articles they tend to concentrate on points of detail, or particular disagreements with other writers, and despite an introductory essay which attempts to relate the issues discussed to each other, and to locate them in the general field of contemporary action theory, this will not serve as an introduction to the subject for the novice. Some of the essays are on (...)
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  13.  10
    Judging Justice. [REVIEW]L. S. D. - 1980 - Review of Metaphysics 34 (2):393-395.
    This book would more aptly, if wordily, have been subtitled "An Introduction to Contemporary Liberal, Anglo-American Political Philosophy." The author’s purpose is "to bring within a single focus the main lines of thinking in the recent welter of speculation on social justice" as set forth by such scholars as John Rawls, Robert Nozick, and Kenneth Arrow. Pettit’s conception of political philosophy, his selection of views to be considered, and his judgments of those views are bounded by political assumptions derived from (...)
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  14.  25
    Kant’s Moral Philosophy, an Interpretation of the Categorical Imperative. [REVIEW]L. L. D. - 1980 - Review of Metaphysics 34 (1):158-159.
    A defense of Kant’s moral philosophy. The author seeks to counteract those interpretations of Kant that restrict their focus to the Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals. He argues that one must look at the whole of Kant’s writings, the earlier and later ethical writings as well as the theoretical works. This makes it possible for him to challenge the popular misconceptions of Kant’s teaching: the overemphasis on the correct motive of an action, the mistaken impression that consequences are of (...)
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  15.  8
    Moral Principles and Political Obligation. [REVIEW]L. N. D. - 1982 - Review of Metaphysics 35 (4):911-913.
    Four theories of political obligation are here subjected to meticulous scrutiny and found wanting, from which "We must conclude," Simmons says, "that citizens generally have no special political bonds which require that they obey and support the governments of their countries of residence". The four are consent theory, fairness theory, the natural duty of justice, and gratitude theory. As Simmons acknowledges, all four "fall squarely within the mainstream of liberal political theory", and the question is, how does Simmons draw his (...)
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  16.  17
    Purpose in a World of Chance. [REVIEW]L. D. - 1979 - Review of Metaphysics 33 (1):209-211.
    A well-known biologist tries to show in this book that the effort to understand living things mechanistically is utterly frustrated by new discoveries in genetics and ethology. In opposition to Jacques Monod, Thorpe argues that purpose and mind rather than chance and necessity rule the world. His last chapter is called "The Primacy of ‘Mind’ in Nature"—a title somewhat out of keeping with that of the book as a whole. The latter seems to set the problem, the former the solution.
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  17.  20
    Schopenhauer. [REVIEW]L. L. D. - 1981 - Review of Metaphysics 35 (1):134-136.
    This work is part of the Arguments of the Philosophers series that aims to give a contemporary analytic assessment of "the great and influential philosophers". With Schopenhauer, however, the series runs up against an unruly subject overtly critical of analytic methods as unrevealing. In view of this he may well appear to be a "not very systematic thinker." It is Hamlyn's task, then, to try to isolate the main argument of his work--which he does by means of "reconstruction" and analysis (...)
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  18.  12
    Speculative Grammars of the Middle Ages. [REVIEW]L. D. - 1972 - Review of Metaphysics 26 (2):352-354.
    Bursill-Hall, writing as a linguist, has produced a book of interest and use to all students of philosophy who are intrigued either by medieval or by modern theories of language, or by both. Bursill-Hall’s book is the first full-length presentation of this material in English. After a brief, not to say, desultory, survey of the history of linguistic theory from the Greeks until the appearance of the so-called Modistae, the author discusses the descriptive technique and the terminology of the speculative (...)
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  19.  30
    The Political Uses of Ideology. [REVIEW]L. S. D. - 1975 - Review of Metaphysics 29 (1):135-137.
    There is a widespread disagreement, Drucker observes, about "what an ideology is." He proposes to cast light on the subject, not by proffering his own definition, but by showing that the diversity of opinion about the meaning of ideology is itself the product of differing ideological points of view. Part I of the book describes "the various definitions of ideology which occur in writing directed primarily to intellectual audiences," notably the views of Destutt de Tracy, Marx, Comte, and several contemporary (...)
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  20.  22
    The Social Problem in the Philosophy of Rousseau. [REVIEW]L. S. D. - 1975 - Review of Metaphysics 29 (1):130-131.
    Charvet presents a "critical reconstruction" of Rousseau’s argument in the Second Discourse, Emile, and the Social Contract, in order to elucidate the French philosopher’s thought about the problem of "the individual’s relation to others in society." While the book is devoid of reference to other works of Rousseau scholarship, this seeming lack helps to give Charvet’s critical work a refreshing clarity and directness.
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