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L. S. D. [8]L. D. [7]L. L. D. [4]L. P. D. [1]
Linke D. [1]L. N. D. [1]Leszczyński D. [1]
  1.  50
    The Locked-in Syndrome and the Behaviorist Epistemology of Other Minds.M. Moskopp Kurthen, Linke D. & Reuter D. B. - 1991 - Theoretical Medicine 12 (March):69-79.
    In this paper, the problem of correct ascriptions of consciousness to patients in neurological intensive care medicine is explored as a special case of the general philosophical other minds problem. It is argued that although clinical ascriptions of consciousness and coma are mostly based on behavioral evidence, a behaviorist epistemology of other minds is not likely to succeed. To illustrate this, the so-called total locked-in syndrome, in which preserved consciousness is combined with a total loss of motor abilities due to (...)
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  2.  4
    The Plague: A Lay Comment on a Medical Note.L. P. D. - 1954 - Classical Quarterly 4 (3-4):174-.
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  3.  10
    Art and the Religious Experience.L. D. - 1973 - Review of Metaphysics 27 (1):147-147.
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  4.  18
    Diderot’s Chaotic Order: Approach to Synthesis.L. S. D. - 1974 - Review of Metaphysics 28 (2):342-343.
    The author of this study aims to provide a synthetic survey of Diderot’s philosophy, as distinguished from the numerous analytic studies that have been made of particular aspects of the Frenchman’s thought. The central thread uniting Diderot’s various works, Crocker contends, is a view of the universe as comprising simultaneously both order and disorder in an ineluctable tension. In the initial chapter, Crocker outlines this rather loose theme by examining Diderot’s "dynamic" conception of the physical universe and man’s ambiguous relation (...)
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  5. The Role of Theories in Biological Systematics.L. D. - 2001 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 32 (2):221-238.
    The role of scientific theories in classifying plants and animals is traced from Hennig's phylogenetics and the evolutionary taxonomy of Simpson and Mayr, through numerical phenetics, to present-day cladistics. Hennig limited biological classification to sister groups so that this one relation can be expressed unambiguously in classifications. Simpson and Mayr were willing to sacrifice precision in representation in order to include additional features of evolution in the construction of classifications. In order to make classifications more objective, precise and quantitative, numerical (...)
     
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