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  1. A Materialist Theory of the Mind.D. M. Armstrong - 1968 - Routledge.
    Breaking new ground in the debate about the relation of mind and body, David Armstrong's classic text - first published in 1968 - remains the most compelling and comprehensive statement of the view that the mind is material or physical. In the preface to this new edition, the author reflects on the book's impact and considers it in the light of subsequent developments. He also provides a bibliography of all the key writings to have appeared in the materialist debate.
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  2. What is a Law of Nature?D. M. Armstrong - 1983 - Cambridge University Press.
    This is a study of a crucial and controversial topic in metaphysics and the philosophy of science: the status of the laws of nature. D. M. Armstrong works out clearly and in comprehensive detail a largely original view that laws are relations between properties or universals. The theory is continuous with the views on universals and more generally with the scientific realism that Professor Armstrong has advanced in earlier publications. He begins here by mounting an attack on the orthodox and (...)
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  3. Truth and Truthmakers.D. M. Armstrong - 2004 - Cambridge University Press.
    Truths are determined not by what we believe, but by the way the world is. Or so realists about truth believe. Philosophers call such theories correspondence theories of truth. Truthmaking theory, which now has many adherents among contemporary philosophers, is the most recent development of a realist theory of truth, and in this book D. M. Armstrong offers the first full-length study of this theory. He examines its applications to different sorts of truth, including contingent truths, modal truths, truths about (...)
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  4. A World of States of Affairs.D. M. Armstrong - 1996 - Cambridge University Press.
    In this important study D. M. Armstrong offers a comprehensive system of analytical metaphysics that synthesises but also develops his thinking over the last twenty years. Armstrong's analysis, which acknowledges the 'logical atomism' of Russell and Wittgenstein, makes facts the fundamental constituents of the world, examining properties, relations, numbers, classes, possibility and necessity, dispositions, causes and laws. All these, it is argued, find their place and can be understood inside a scheme of states of affairs. This is a comprehensive and (...)
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  5. Universals: An Opinionated Introduction.D. M. Armstrong - 1989 - Westview Press.
    In this short text, a distinguished philosopher turns his attention to one of the oldest and most fundamental philosophical problems of all: How it is that we are able to sort and classify different things as being of the same natural class? Professor Armstrong carefully sets out six major theories—ancient, modern, and contemporary—and assesses the strengths and weaknesses of each. Recognizing that there are no final victories or defeats in metaphysics, Armstrong nonetheless defends a traditional account of universals as the (...)
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  6. Universals and Scientific Realism.D. M. Armstrong - 1978 - Cambridge University Press.
    v. 1. Nominalism and realism.--v. 2. A theory of universals.
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  7. Belief, Truth and Knowledge.D. M. Armstrong - 1973 - Cambridge University Press.
    A wide-ranging study of the central concepts in epistemology - belief, truth and knowledge. Professor Armstrong offers a dispositional account of general beliefs and of knowledge of general propositions. Belief about particular matters of fact are described as structures in the mind of the believer which represent or 'map' reality, while general beliefs are dispositions to extend the 'map' or introduce casual relations between portions of the map according to general rules. 'Knowledge' denotes the reliability of such beliefs as representations (...)
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  8. A Combinatorial Theory of Possibility.D. M. Armstrong - 1989 - Cambridge University Press.
    David Armstrong's book is a contribution to the philosophical discussion about possible worlds. Taking Wittgenstein's Tractatus as his point of departure, Professor Armstrong argues that nonactual possibilities and possible worlds are recombinations of actually existing elements, and as such are useful fictions. There is an extended criticism of the alternative-possible-worlds approach championed by the American philosopher David Lewis. This major work will be read with interest by a wide range of philosophers.
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  9.  27
    Papers in Metaphysics and Epistemology.D. M. Armstrong & David Lewis - 2001 - Philosophical Review 110 (1):77.
    This is a collection of twenty-five papers and reviews by the leading analytic philosopher of our time. It adds to the papers on metaphysics and epistemology to be found in his previous two-volume collection published by Oxford University Press. One previously unpublished paper—“Why Conditionalize?”—is included. Australasian philosophers may note with some pride that eleven of the pieces were first published in the Australasian Journal of Philosophy.
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  10.  50
    A World of States of Affairs.John Heil & D. M. Armstrong - 1999 - Philosophical Review 108 (1):115.
    Despite heroic efforts, philosophers have found it increasingly difficult to evade discussion of metaphysical topics. Take the philosophy of mind. Take, in particular, the mind-body problem in its latest guise: the problem of causal relevance. If mental properties are not reducible to physical properties, how can we reconcile the role such properties seem to have in producing bodily motions that constitute actions with the apparent fact that the very same motions are entirely explicable on the basis of purely physical properties (...)
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  11.  27
    Universals: An Opinionated Introduction.Jerrold Levinson & D. M. Armstrong - 1992 - Philosophical Review 101 (3):654.
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  12. Is Introspective Knowledge Incorrigible?D. M. Armstrong - 1963 - Philosophical Review 72 (4):417.
  13.  87
    Dispositions: A Debate.D. M. Armstrong - 1996 - Routledge.
    Dispositions are essential to our understanding of the world. IDispositions: A Debate is an extended dialogue between three distinguished philosophers - D.M. Armstrong, C.B. Martin and U.T. Place - on the many problems associated with dispositions, which reveals their own distinctive accounts of the nature of dispositions. These are then linked to other issues such as the nature of mind, matter, universals, existence, laws of nature and causation.
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  14. In Defence of Structural Universals.D. M. Armstrong - 1986 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 64 (1):85 – 88.
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  15. Meaning and Communication.D. M. Armstrong - 1971 - Philosophical Review 80 (4):427-447.
  16.  77
    Are Quantities Relations? A Reply to Bigelow and Pargetter.D. M. Armstrong - 1988 - Philosophical Studies 54 (3):305 - 316.
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  17. Classes Are States of Affairs.D. M. Armstrong - 1991 - Mind 100 (2):189-200.
  18. Properties.D. M. Armstrong - 1997 - In D. H. Mellor & Alex Oliver (eds.), Properties. Oxford University Press.
  19. Dispositions: A Debate.Tim Crane, D. M. Armstrong & C. B. Martin - 1996 - New York: Routledge.
    Dispositions are essential to our understanding of the world. Dispositions: A Debate is an extended dialogue between three distinguished philosophers - D.M. Armstrong, C.B. Martin and U.T. Place - on the many problems associated with dispositions, which reveals their own distinctive accounts of the nature of dispositions. These are then linked to other issues such as the nature of mind, matter, universals, existence, laws of nature and causation.
     
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  20. II—Does Knowledge Entail Belief?D. M. Armstrong - 1970 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 70 (1):21-36.
  21. Quantities.John Bigelow, Robert Pargetter & D. M. Armstrong - 1988 - Philosophical Studies 54 (3):287 - 304.
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  22. An Argument Against David Lewis' Theory of Possible Worlds.Peter Forrest & D. M. Armstrong - 1984 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 62 (2):164 – 168.
  23.  84
    The Nature of Number.Peter Forrest & D. M. Armstrong - 1987 - Philosophical Papers 16 (3):165-186.
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  24. Consciousness and Causality.D. M. Armstrong & Norman Malcolm - 1985 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 36 (3):341-344.
     
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  25. The Nature of Possibility.D. M. Armstrong - 1986 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 16 (4):575 - 594.
    I want to defend a Combinatorialtheory of possibility. Such a view traces the very idea of possibility to the idea of the combinations – all the combinations which respect a certain simple form – of given, actual, elements. Combination is to be understood widely enough to cover the notions of expansion and contraction. The combinatorial idea is not new, of course. Wittgenstein gave a classical exposition of it in the Tractatus. Perhaps its charter is 3.4: ‘A proposition determines a place (...)
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  26. God’s Lottery.Storrs McCall & D. M. Armstrong - 1989 - Analysis 49 (4):223 - 224.
  27. Causes and Laws.Adrian Heathcote & D. M. Armstrong - 1991 - Noûs 25 (1):63-73.
  28.  26
    The Immaterial Self: A Defence of the Cartesian Dualist Conception of the Mind.D. M. Armstrong - 1993 - Philosophical Review 102 (2):272.
  29.  49
    Berkeley's Theory of Vision: A Critical Examination of Bishop Berkeley's Essay Towards a New Theory of Vision.D. M. Armstrong - 1960 - Garland.
  30.  70
    Going Through the Open Door Again: Counterfactual Versus Singularist Theories of Causation.D. M. Armstrong - 2001 - In Gerhard Preyer (ed.), Reality and Humean Supervenience: Essays on the Philosophy of David Lewis. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 163--176.
  31.  15
    Dispositions.D. M. Armstrong - 1998 - Philosophical and Phenomenological Research 62 (1):246-248.
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  32.  89
    A Naturalist Program: Epistemology and Ontology.D. M. Armstrong - 1999 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 73 (2):77 - 89.
  33. The Scope and Limits of Human Knowledge.D. M. Armstrong - 2006 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 84 (2):159 – 166.
    This paper argues that the foundations of our knowledge are the bed-rock certainties of ordinary life, what may be called the Moorean truths. Beyond that are the well-established results within the empirical sciences, and whatever has been proved in the rational sciences of mathematics and logic. Otherwise there is only belief, which may be more or less rational. A moral drawn from this is that dogmatism should be moderated on all sides.
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  34.  69
    Reply to Heil.D. M. Armstrong - 2006 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 84 (2):245 – 247.
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  35. Difficult Cases in the Theory of Truthmaking.D. M. Armstrong - 2000 - The Monist 83 (1):150-160.
    Analyzes difficult case in the theory of truthmaking. Account on the notion of a truthmaker by philosopher Bertrand Russell; Context of the correspondence theory of truth; Requisites of a truthmaker; Discussion on negative truths, universally quantified truths and modal truths.
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  36.  95
    Acting and Trying.D. M. Armstrong - 1973 - Philosophical Papers 2 (1):1-15.
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  37.  22
    Critical Notice.D. M. Armstrong - 1958 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 36 (2):128 – 145.
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  38. The Causal Theory of Properties: Shoemaker, Ellis and Others.D. M. Armstrong - forthcoming - Philosophical Studies.
  39.  74
    Towards a Theory of Properties: Work in Progress on the Problem of Universals.D. M. Armstrong - 1975 - Philosophy 50 (192):145 - 155.
  40.  68
    Papers in Metaphysics and Epistemology.D. M. Armstrong - 2001 - Philosophical Review 110 (1):77-79.
    This is part of a three-volume collection of most of David Lewis' papers in philosophy, except for those that previously appeared in his Philosophical Papers (Oxford University Press, 1983 and 1986). They are now offered in a readily accessible form. This second volume is devoted to Lewis' work in metaphysics and epistemology. The purpose of this collection, and the volumes that precede and follow it, is to disseminate more widely the work of an eminent and influential contemporary philosopher. The volume (...)
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  41.  19
    Berkeley's Theory of Vision.D. M. Armstrong - 1963 - Journal of Philosophy 60 (16):472-473.
  42. Are Dispositions Ultimate? Reply to Franklin.D. M. Armstrong - 1988 - Philosophical Quarterly 38 (150):84-86.
    It is argued that it is possible that all properties are categorical, contrary to the arguments of Franklin that there must be dispositionality "all the way down". The tasks for which dispositionality is alleged to be needed can be fulfilled by laws of nature, which are categorical relations between universals.
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  43.  69
    Towards a Theory of Properties: Work in Progress on the Problem of Universals: D. M. Armstrong.D. M. Armstrong - 1975 - Philosophy 50 (192):145-155.
    Many philosophers have declared that everything which exists is a particular. There is a weak interpretation of this doctrine which I believe to be a true proposition, and a strong one which I believe to be false.
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  44.  55
    Reply to Van Fraassen.D. M. Armstrong - 1988 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 66 (2):224 – 229.
  45.  56
    The Secondary Qualities.D. M. Armstrong - 1968 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 46 (3):225 – 241.
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  46. Truthmakers for Negative Truths, and for Truths of Mere Possibility.D. M. Armstrong - 2007 - In Jean-Maurice Monnoyer (ed.), Metaphysics and Truthmakers. Ontos Verlag. pp. 99.
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  47. Introspection.D. M. Armstrong - 1994 - In Quassim Cassam (ed.), Self-Knowledge. Oxford University Press. pp. 109--117.
    This paper will argue that there is no such thing as introspective access to judgments and decisions. I t won't challenge the existence of introspective access to perceptual and imagistic states, nor to emotional feelings and bodily sensations. On the contrary, the model presented in Section 2 presumes such access. Hence introspection is here divided into two categories: introspection of propositional attitude events, on the one hand, and introspection of broadly perceptual events, on the other. I shall assume that the (...)
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  48. Nominalism and Realism: Volume 1: Universals and Scientific Realism.D. M. Armstrong - 1980 - Cambridge University Press.
    This is a study, in two volumes, of one of the longest-standing philosophical problems: the problem of universals. In volume I David Armstrong surveys and criticizes the main approaches and solutions to the problems that have been canvassed, rejecting the various forms of nominalism and 'Platonic' realism. In volume II he develops an important theory of his own, an objective theory of universals based not on linguistic conventions, but on the actual and potential findings of natural science. He thus reconciles (...)
     
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  49.  80
    Reality and Humean Supervenience: Essays on the Philosophy of David Lewis.Gerhard Preyer, Frank Siebelt, D. M. Armstrong, Jonathan Bennett, John Bigelow, Daniel Bonevac, Phillip Bricker, Peter Forrest, Terence Horgan, Harold W. Noonan, Paul Teller & Michael Tye (eds.) - 2001 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Reality and Humean Supervenience confronts the reader with central aspects in the philosophy of David Lewis, whose work in ontology, metaphysics, logic, probability, philosophy of mind, and language articulates a unique and systematic foundation for modern physicalism.
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  50.  37
    Reply to Martin.D. M. Armstrong - 1997 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 75 (2):214 – 217.
    Totality states of affairs (Russell's 'general facts') are defended against Martin's criticisms. Although higher-order, they are not 'abstract in Quine's sense. If space-time is the whole of being, and if it can be seen as a vast conjunction of states of affairs, then the state of affairs that this is the totality of lower-order states of affairs is not additional to, but completes, space-times. If totality states of affairs are admitted, then there seems no need for any further negative states (...)
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