Results for 'D. M. Kamuya'

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  1.  69
    Experiences with community engagement and informed consent in a genetic cohort study of severe childhood diseases in Kenya.V. M. Marsh, D. M. Kamuya, A. M. Mlamba, T. N. Williams & S. S. Molyneux - 2010 - BMC Medical Ethics 11 (1):13-13.
    BackgroundThe potential contribution of community engagement to addressing ethical challenges for international biomedical research is well described, but there is relatively little documented experience of community engagement to inform its development in practice. This paper draws on experiences around community engagement and informed consent during a genetic cohort study in Kenya to contribute to understanding the strengths and challenges of community engagement in supporting ethical research practice, focusing on issues of communication, the role of field workers in 'doing ethics' on (...)
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  2. Working with Concepts: The Role of Community in International Collaborative Biomedical Research.V. M. Marsh, D. K. Kamuya, M. J. Parker & C. S. Molyneux - 2011 - Public Health Ethics 4 (1):26-39.
    The importance of communities in strengthening the ethics of international collaborative research is increasingly highlighted, but there has been much debate about the meaning of the term ‘community’ and its specific normative contribution. We argue that ‘community’ is a contingent concept that plays an important normative role in research through the existence of morally significant interplay between notions of community and individuality. We draw on experience of community engagement in rural Kenya to illustrate two aspects of this interplay: (i) that (...)
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  3. What is a Law of Nature?D. M. Armstrong - 1983 - New York: Cambridge University Press. Edited by Sydney Shoemaker.
    This is a study of a crucial and controversial topic in metaphysics and the philosophy of science: the status of the laws of nature. D. M. Armstrong works out clearly and in comprehensive detail a largely original view that laws are relations between properties or universals. The theory is continuous with the views on universals and more generally with the scientific realism that Professor Armstrong has advanced in earlier publications. He begins here by mounting an attack on the orthodox and (...)
  4. A Materialist Theory of the Mind.D. M. Armstrong - 1968 - New York: Routledge. Edited by Ted Honderich.
    Breaking new ground in the debate about the relation of mind and body, David Armstrong's classic text - first published in 1968 - remains the most compelling and comprehensive statement of the view that the mind is material or physical. In the preface to this new edition, the author reflects on the book's impact and considers it in the light of subsequent developments. He also provides a bibliography of all the key writings to have appeared in the materialist debate.
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  5. A World of States of Affairs.D. M. Armstrong - 1997 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    In this important study D. M. Armstrong offers a comprehensive system of analytical metaphysics that synthesises but also develops his thinking over the last twenty years. Armstrong's analysis, which acknowledges the 'logical atomism' of Russell and Wittgenstein, makes facts the fundamental constituents of the world, examining properties, relations, numbers, classes, possibility and necessity, dispositions, causes and laws. All these, it is argued, find their place and can be understood inside a scheme of states of affairs. This is a comprehensive and (...)
  6. Universals: an opinionated introduction.D. M. Armstrong - 1989 - Boulder: Westview Press.
    In this short text, a distinguished philosopher turns his attention to one of the oldest and most fundamental philosophical problems of all: How it is that we are able to sort and classify different things as being of the same natural class? Professor Armstrong carefully sets out six major theories—ancient, modern, and contemporary—and assesses the strengths and weaknesses of each. Recognizing that there are no final victories or defeats in metaphysics, Armstrong nonetheless defends a traditional account of universals as the (...)
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  7. How Do Particulars Stand to Universals?D. M. Armstrong - 2004 - In Dean Zimmerman (ed.), Oxford Studies in Metaphysics Volume 1. Oxford University Press UK.
     
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  8. Truth and truthmakers.D. M. Armstrong - 2004 - New York: Cambridge University Press.
    Truths are determined not by what we believe, but by the way the world is. Or so realists about truth believe. Philosophers call such theories correspondence theories of truth. Truthmaking theory, which now has many adherents among contemporary philosophers, is the most recent development of a realist theory of truth, and in this book D. M. Armstrong offers the first full-length study of this theory. He examines its applications to different sorts of truth, including contingent truths, modal truths, truths about (...)
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  9. Belief, Truth and Knowledge.D. M. Armstrong - 1973 - London,: Cambridge University Press.
    A wide-ranging study of the central concepts in epistemology - belief, truth and knowledge. Professor Armstrong offers a dispositional account of general beliefs and of knowledge of general propositions. Belief about particular matters of fact are described as structures in the mind of the believer which represent or 'map' reality, while general beliefs are dispositions to extend the 'map' or introduce casual relations between portions of the map according to general rules. 'Knowledge' denotes the reliability of such beliefs as representations (...)
  10. Perception and belief.D. M. Armstrong - 1988 - In Jonathan Dancy (ed.), Perceptual knowledge. New York: Oxford University Press.
     
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  11.  32
    Alfarabi's Book of Religion and Related Texts.D. M. Dunlop, Muhsin Mahdi & Alfarabi - 1969 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 89 (4):798.
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  12.  45
    Papers in Metaphysics and Epistemology.D. M. Armstrong & David Lewis - 2001 - Philosophical Review 110 (1):77.
    This is a collection of twenty-five papers and reviews by the leading analytic philosopher of our time. It adds to the papers on metaphysics and epistemology to be found in his previous two-volume collection published by Oxford University Press. One previously unpublished paper—“Why Conditionalize?”—is included. Australasian philosophers may note with some pride that eleven of the pieces were first published in the Australasian Journal of Philosophy.
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  13. Encyclopedia of Philosophy, 2nd ed.D. M. Borchert (ed.) - 2006
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  14. Is Introspective Knowledge Incorrigible?D. M. Armstrong - 1963 - Philosophical Review 72 (4):417.
  15. Comment on Ellis.D. M. Armstrong - 1999 - In Howard Sankey (ed.), Causation and Laws of Nature. Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 35--38.
  16.  49
    Benefits and payments for research participants: Experiences and views from a research centre on the Kenyan coast.M. Marsh Vicki, M. Kamuya Dorcas, M. Mlamba Albert, N. Williams Thomas & S. Molyneux Sassy - 2010 - BMC Medical Ethics (1):13-.
    Background: There is general consensus internationally that unfair distribution of the benefits of research is exploitative and should be avoided or reduced. However, what constitutes fair benefits, and the exact nature of the benefits and their mode of provision can be strongly contested. Empirical studies have the potential to contribute viewpoints and experiences to debates and guidelines, but few have been conducted. We conducted a study to support the development of guidelines on benefits and payments for studies conducted by the (...)
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  17. In defence of structural universals.D. M. Armstrong - 1986 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 64 (1):85 – 88.
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  18. Aristotle’s Biology was not Essentialist.D. M. Balme - 1980 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 62 (1):1-12.
  19. Meaning and communication.D. M. Armstrong - 1971 - Philosophical Review 80 (4):427-447.
  20. Naturalism, materialism, and first philosophy.D. M. Armstrong - 1978 - Philosophia 8 (2-3):261-276.
    First, The doctrine of naturalism, That reality is spatio-Temporal, Is defended. Second, The doctrine of materialism or physicalism, That this spatio-Temporal reality involves nothing but the entities of physics working according to the principles of physics, Is defended. Third, It is argued that these doctrines do not constitute a "first philosophy." a satisfactory first philosophy should recognize universals, In the form of instantiated properties and relations. Laws of nature are constituted by relations between universals. What universals there are, And what (...)
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  21. Dispositions: a debate.D. M. Armstrong - 1996 - New York: Routledge. Edited by C. B. Martin, U. T. Place & Tim Crane.
    Dispositions are essential to our understanding of the world. IDispositions: A Debate is an extended dialogue between three distinguished philosophers - D.M. Armstrong, C.B. Martin and U.T. Place - on the many problems associated with dispositions, which reveals their own distinctive accounts of the nature of dispositions. These are then linked to other issues such as the nature of mind, matter, universals, existence, laws of nature and causation.
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  22.  93
    Comment on Smart.D. M. Armstrong - 1999 - In Howard Sankey (ed.), Causation and Laws of Nature. Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 171--172.
  23. II—Does Knowledge Entail Belief?D. M. Armstrong - 1970 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 70 (1):21-36.
    D. M. Armstrong; II—Does Knowledge Entail Belief?, Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society, Volume 70, Issue 1, 1 June 1970, Pages 21–36, https://doi.org/10.109.
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  24. Classes are states of affairs.D. M. Armstrong - 1991 - Mind 100 (2):189-200.
    Argues that a set is the mereological whole of the singleton sets of its members (following Lewis's Parts of Classes), and that the singleton set of X is the state of affairs of X's having some unit-making property.
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  25. Selection from A Combinational Theory of Possibility.D. M. Armstrong - 2004 - In Tim Crane & Katalin Farkas (eds.), Metaphysics: a guide and anthology. Oxford University Press UK.
     
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  26. Selection from Universals: An Opinionated Introduction.D. M. Armstrong - 2004 - In Tim Crane & Katalin Farkas (eds.), Metaphysics: a guide and anthology. Oxford University Press UK.
     
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  27.  61
    ΓΕΝΟΣ_ and _ΕΙΔΟΣ in Aristotle's Biology.D. M. Balme - 1962 - Classical Quarterly 12 (01):81-.
    It is not certain when or by whom S0009838800011642_inline1 and S0009838800011642_inline2 were first technically distinguished as genus and species. The distinction does not appear in Plato's extant writings, whereas Aristotle seems to take it for granted in the Topics, which is usually regarded as among his earliest treatises. In his dialogues Plato seems able to use S0009838800011642_inline3 interchangeably to denote any group or division in a diairesis, including the group that is to be divided.
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  28. Development of Biology in Aristotle and Theophrastus: Theory of Spontaneous Generation.D. M. Balme - 1962 - Phronesis 7 (1):91-104.
  29. Encyclopedia of Philosophy, second edition.D. M. Borchert (ed.) - 2006
  30. Supplement to the Encyclopedia of Philosophy.D. M. Borchert (ed.) - 1996 - Macmillan.
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  31. What is Consciousness?D. M. Armstrong - 2003 - In John Heil (ed.), Philosophy of Mind: A Guide and Anthology. Oxford University Press.
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  32.  26
    ΓΕΝΟΣ_ and _ΕΙΔΟΣ in Aristotle's Biology.D. M. Balme - 1962 - Classical Quarterly 12 (1):81-98.
    It is not certain when or by whomandwere first technically distinguished asgenusandspecies. The distinction does not appear in Plato's extant writings, whereas Aristotle seems to take it for granted in theTopics, which is usually regarded as among his earliest treatises. In his dialogues Plato seems able to useinterchangeably to denote any group or division in a diairesis, including the group that is to be divided.
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  33. The Nature of Possibility.D. M. Armstrong - 1986 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 16 (4):575 - 594.
    I want to defend a Combinatorialtheory of possibility. Such a view traces the very idea of possibility to the idea of the combinations – all the combinations which respect a certain simple form – of given, actual, elements. Combination is to be understood widely enough to cover the notions of expansion and contraction. The combinatorial idea is not new, of course. Wittgenstein gave a classical exposition of it in the Tractatus. Perhaps its charter is 3.4: ‘A proposition determines a place (...)
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  34. Are Quantities Relations? A Reply to Bigelow and Pargetter.D. M. Armstrong - 1988 - Philosophical Studies 54 (3):305 - 316.
  35. Consciousness and Causality.D. M. Armstrong & Norman Malcolm - 1985 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 36 (3):341-344.
     
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  36.  44
    The Immaterial Self: A Defence of the Cartesian Dualist Conception of the Mind.D. M. Armstrong - 1993 - Philosophical Review 102 (2):272.
  37. .D. M. Berry & A. Fagerjord - 2017
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  38.  76
    Greek Science and Mechanism I. Aristotle on Nature and Chance.D. M. Balme - 1939 - Classical Quarterly 33 (3-4):129-.
  39.  95
    A Naturalist Program: Epistemology and Ontology.D. M. Armstrong - 1999 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 73 (2):77 - 89.
  40.  36
    Critical notice.D. M. Armstrong - 1958 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 36 (2):128 – 145.
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  41. Against Ostrich Nominalism: A Reply to Michael Devitt.D. M. Armstrong - 1997 - In D. H. Mellor & Alex Oliver (eds.), Properties. Oxford University Press.
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  42. Properties.D. M. Armstrong - 1997 - In D. H. Mellor & Alex Oliver (eds.), Properties. Oxford University Press.
  43.  16
    ΓΕΝΟΣ_ and _ΕΙΔΟΣ in Aristotle's Biology.D. M. Balme - 1962 - Classical Quarterly 12 (1):81-98.
    It is not certain when or by whomandwere first technically distinguished asgenusandspecies. The distinction does not appear in Plato's extant writings, whereas Aristotle seems to take it for granted in theTopics, which is usually regarded as among his earliest treatises. In his dialogues Plato seems able to useinterchangeably to denote any group or division in a diairesis, including the group that is to be divided.
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  44. E. Roy Weintraub. How Economics Became a Mathematical Science.D. M. Hausman - 2003 - Philosophia Mathematica 11 (3):354-357.
     
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  45.  5
    Culture Change in Tribal Bihar. Munda and Oraon.D. M. S. & Sachchidananda - 1965 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 85 (2):291.
  46.  48
    Berkeley's Theory of Vision.D. M. Armstrong - 1963 - Journal of Philosophy 60 (16):472-473.
  47.  27
    Organisms, Agency, and Evolution.D. M. Walsh - 2015 - Cambridge University Press.
    The central insight of Darwin's Origin of Species is that evolution is an ecological phenomenon, arising from the activities of organisms in the 'struggle for life'. By contrast, the Modern Synthesis theory of evolution, which rose to prominence in the twentieth century, presents evolution as a fundamentally molecular phenomenon, occurring in populations of sub-organismal entities - genes. After nearly a century of success, the Modern Synthesis theory is now being challenged by empirical advances in the study of organismal development and (...)
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  48.  11
    Greek Science and Mechanism I. Aristotle on Nature and Chance.D. M. Balme - 1939 - Classical Quarterly 33 (3-4):129-138.
  49.  42
    Bohmian Trajectories Post-Decoherence.D. M. Appleby - 1999 - Foundations of Physics 29 (12):1885-1916.
    The role of the environment in producing the correct classical limit in the Bohm interpretation of quantum mechanics is investigated, in the context of a model of quantum Brownian motion. One of the effects of the interaction is to produce a rapid approximate diagonalisation of the reduced density matrix in the position representation. This effect is, by itself, insufficient to produce generically quasi-classical behaviour of the Bohmian trajectory. However, it is shown that, if the system particle is initially in an (...)
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  50. Difficult Cases in the Theory of Truthmaking.D. M. Armstrong - 2000 - The Monist 83 (1):150-160.
    Analyzes difficult case in the theory of truthmaking. Account on the notion of a truthmaker by philosopher Bertrand Russell; Context of the correspondence theory of truth; Requisites of a truthmaker; Discussion on negative truths, universally quantified truths and modal truths.
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