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  1.  39
    Are Withholding and Withdrawing Therapy Always Morally Equivalent?D. P. Sulmasy & J. Sugarman - 1994 - Journal of Medical Ethics 20 (4):218-224.
    Many medical ethicists accept the thesis that there is no moral difference between withholding and withdrawing life-sustaining therapy. In this paper, we offer an interesting counterexample which shows that this thesis is not always true. Withholding is distinguished from withdrawing by the simple fact that therapy must have already been initiated in order to speak coherently about withdrawal. Provided that there is a genuine need and that therapy is biomedically effective, the historical fact that therapy has been initiated entails a (...)
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  2. Ethics Education for Medical House Officers: Long-Term Improvements in Knowledge and Confidence.D. P. Sulmasy & E. S. Marx - 1997 - Journal of Medical Ethics 23 (2):88-92.
    OBJECTIVE: To examine the long-term effects of an innovative curriculum on medical house officers' (HOs') knowledge, confidence, and attitudes regarding medical ethics. DESIGN: Long term cohort study. The two-year curriculum, implemented by a single physician ethicist with assistance from other faculty, was fully integrated into the programme. It consisted of monthly sessions: ethics morning report alternating with didactic conferences. The content included topics such as ethics vocabulary and principles, withdrawing life support, informed consent, and justice. Identical content was offered simultaneously (...)
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  3.  70
    A Randomized Trial of Ethics Education for Medical House Officers.D. P. Sulmasy, G. Geller, D. M. Levine & R. R. Faden - 1993 - Journal of Medical Ethics 19 (3):157-163.
    We report the results of a randomized trial to assess the impact of an innovative ethics curriculum on the knowledge and confidence of 85 medical house officers in a university hospital programme, as well as their responses to a simulated clinical case. Twenty-five per cent of the house officers received a lecture series, 25 per cent received lectures and case conferences, with an ethicist in attendance, and 50 per cent served as controls. A post-intervention questionnaire was administered. Knowledge scores did (...)
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  4.  10
    In Defense of the Amphibians: A Critical Appraisal of Engelhardt on the Recent History of Christian Bioethics.D. P. Sulmasy - 2014 - Christian Bioethics 20 (2):187-195.
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  5.  17
    Researchers' Preferences and Attitudes on Ethical Aspects of Genomics Research: A Comparative Study Between the USA and Spain.M. Ruiz-Canela, J. I. Valle-Mansilla & D. P. Sulmasy - 2009 - Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (4):251-257.
    Introduction: The use of human samples in genomic research has increased ethical debate about informed consent (IC) requirements and the information that subjects should receive regarding the results of the research. However, there are no quantitative data regarding researchers’ attitudes about these issues. Methods: We present the results of a survey of 104 US and 100 Spanish researchers who had published genomic epidemiology studies in 61 journals during 2006. Results: Researchers preferred a broader IC than the IC they had actually (...)
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  6.  60
    Do the Ward Notes Reflect the Quality of End-of-Life Care?D. P. Sulmasy, M. Dwyer & E. Marx - 1996 - Journal of Medical Ethics 22 (6):344-348.
    OBJECTIVES: To study the accuracy of reviewing ward notes (chart review) as a measure of the quality of care rendered to patients with "Do Not Resuscitate" (DNR) orders. DESIGN: We reviewed the charts of 19 consecutive, competent inpatients with DNR orders for evidence that the staff addressed a broad range of patient care needs called Concurrent Care Concerns (CCCs), such as withholding treatments other than resuscitation itself, and attention to patient comfort needs. We then interviewed the patient, consultant physician, house (...)
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  7.  13
    Physicians' Confidence in Discussing Do Not Resuscitate Orders with Patients and Surrogates.D. P. Sulmasy, J. R. Sood & W. A. Ury - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (2):96-101.
    Purpose: Physicians are often reluctant to discuss “Do Not Resuscitate” orders with patients. Although perceived self-efficacy is a known prerequisite for behavioural change, little is understood about the confidence of physicians regarding DNR discussions.Subjects and methods: A survey of 217 internal medicine attendings and 132 housestaff at two teaching hospitals about their attitudes and confidence regarding DNR discussions.Results: Participants were significantly less confident about their ability to discuss DNR orders than to discuss consent for medical procedures , and this was (...)
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  8.  21
    Do the Bishops Have It Right On Health Care Reform?D. P. Sulmasy - 1996 - Christian Bioethics 2 (3):309-325.
    The National Conference of Catholic Bishops has argued for significant government involvement in health care in order to assure respect for what they regard as the right to health care. Critics charge that the bishops are wrong because health care is not a right. In this article, it is argued that these critics are correct in their claim that health care is not a right. However, it is also argued that the premise that health care is not a right does (...)
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  9.  26
    Decision-Making in Patients with Advanced Cancer Compared with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.A. B. Astrow, J. R. Sood, M. T. Nolan, P. B. Terry, L. Clawson, J. Kub, M. Hughes & D. P. Sulmasy - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (9):664-668.
    Aim: Patients with advanced cancer need information about end-of-life treatment options in order to make informed decisions. Clinicians vary in the frequency with which they initiate these discussions.Patients and methods: As part of a long-term longitudinal study, patients with an expected 2-year survival of less than 50% who had advanced gastrointestinal or lung cancer or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis were interviewed. Each patient’s medical record was reviewed at enrollment and at 3 months for evidence of the discussion of patient wishes concerning (...)
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  10.  10
    A Computerized System for Entering Orders to Limit Treatment: Implementation and Evaluation.D. P. Sulmasy & E. S. Marx - 1997 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 8 (3):258.
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  11.  6
    Confidence and Knowledge of Medical Ethics Among Interns Entering Residency in Different Specialties.D. P. Sulmasy, R. E. Ferris & W. A. Ury - 2005 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 16 (3):230.
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