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Denys Turner [36]Derek Turner [21]Dale Turner [16]Derek D. Turner [13]
Dan Turner [9]David Turner [5]Donald L. Turner [5]Denys A. Turner [4]

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Derek D. Turner
Connecticut College
Dale Turner
California State Polytechnic University, Pomona
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  1.  52
    Making Prehistory: Historical Science and the Scientific Realism Debate.Derek Turner - 2007 - Cambridge University Press.
    Scientists often make surprising claims about things that no one can observe. In physics, chemistry, and molecular biology, scientists can at least experiment on those unobservable entities, but what about researchers in fields such as paleobiology and geology who study prehistory, where no such experimentation is possible? Do scientists discover facts about the distant past or do they, in some sense, make prehistory? In this book Derek Turner argues that this problem has surprising and important consequences for the scientific realism (...)
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  2.  37
    Paleontology: A Philosophical Introduction.Derek Turner - 2011 - Cambridge University Press.
    In the wake of the paleobiological revolution of the 1970s and 1980s, paleontologists continue to investigate far-reaching questions about how evolution works. Many of those questions have a philosophical dimension. How is macroevolution related to evolutionary changes within populations? Is evolutionary history contingent? How much can we know about the causes of evolutionary trends? How do paleontologists read the patterns in the fossil record to learn about the underlying evolutionary processes? Derek Turner explores these and other questions, introducing the reader (...)
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  3.  77
    Local Underdetermination in Historical Science.Derek Turner - 2005 - Philosophy of Science 72 (1):209-230.
  4.  57
    Introduction: Scientific Knowledge of the Deep Past.Adrian Currie & Derek Turner - 2016 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 55:43-46.
  5.  17
    A Second Look at the Colors of the Dinosaurs.Derek D. Turner - 2016 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 55:60-68.
  6. Existence Problems in Philosophy and Science.Peter W. Ross & Dale Turner - 2013 - Synthese 190 (18):4239-4259.
    We initially characterize what we’ll call existence problems as problems where there is evidence that a putative entity exists and this evidence is not easily dismissed; however, the evidence is not adequate to justify the claim that the entity exists, and in particular the entity hasn’t been detected. The putative entity is elusive. We then offer a strategy for determining whether an existence problem is philosophical or scientific. According to this strategy (1) existence problems are characterized in terms of causal (...)
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  7.  36
    In Defense of Living Fossils.Derek D. Turner - 2019 - Biology and Philosophy 34 (2):23.
    Lately there has been a wave of criticism of the concept of living fossils. First, recent research has challenged the status of paradigmatic living fossil taxa, such as coelacanths, cycads, and tuataras. Critics have also complained that the living fossil concept is vague and/or ambiguous, and that it is responsible for misconceptions about evolution. This paper defends a particular phylogenetic conception of living fossils, or taxa that exhibit deep prehistoric morphological stability; contain few extant species; and make a high contribution (...)
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  8.  40
    De-Extinction as Artificial Species Selection.Derek D. Turner - 2017 - Philosophy and Technology 30 (4):395-411.
    This paper offers a paleobiological perspective on the debate concerning the possible use of biotechnology to bring back extinct species. One lesson from paleobiology is that extinction selectivity matters in addition to extinction rates and extinction magnitude. Combining some of Darwin’s insights about artificial selection with the theory of species selection that paleobiologists developed in the 1970s and 1980s provides a useful context for thinking about de-extinction. Using recent work on the prioritization of candidate species for de-extinction as a test (...)
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  9.  27
    Revisiting Deep Disagreement.Dale Turner & Larry Wright - 2005 - Informal Logic 25 (1):25-35.
    Argument-giving reasons for a view-is our model of rational dispute resolution. Fogelin suggests that certain "deep" disagreements cannot be resolved in this way because features of their context "undercut the conditions essential to arguing" . In this paper we add some detail to Fogelin's treatment of intractable disagreements. In doing so we distinguish between his relatively modest claim that some disputes cannot be resolved through argument and his more radical claim that such disputes are beyond rational resolution. This distinction, along (...)
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  10. The Many-Universes Solution to the Problem of Evil.Donald Turner - 2003 - In Richard M. Gale & Alexander R. Pruss (eds.), The Existence of God.
     
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  11.  61
    The Topography of Historical Contingency.Rob Inkpen & Derek Turner - 2012 - Journal of the Philosophy of History 6 (1):1-19.
    Abstract Starting with Ben-Menahem's definition of historical contingency as sensitivity to variations in initial conditions, we suggest that historical events and processes can be thought of as forming a complex landscape of contingency and necessity. We suggest three different ways of extending and elaborating Ben-Menahem's concepts: (1) By supplementing them with a notion of historical disturbance; (2) by pointing out that contingency and necessity are subject to scaling effects; (3) by showing how degrees of contingency/necessity can change over time. We (...)
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  12.  12
    Historicity and Explanation.Marc Ereshefsky & Derek Turner - forthcoming - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A.
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  13.  19
    The Lack of Clarity in the Precautionary Principle.Derek Turner & Lauren Hartzell - 2004 - Environmental Values 13 (4):449 - 460.
    The precautionary principle states, roughly, that it is better to take precautionary measures now than to deal with serious harms to the environment or human health later on. This paper builds on the work of Neil A. Manson in order to show that the precautionary principle, in all of its forms, is fraught with vagueness and ambiguity. We examine the version of the precautionary principle that was formulated at the Wingspread Conference sponsored by the Science and Environmental Health Network in (...)
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  14. The Darkness of God Negativity in Christian Mysticism.Denys Turner - 1995
     
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  15.  45
    Gould’s Replay Revisited.Derek D. Turner - 2011 - Biology and Philosophy 26 (1):65-79.
    This paper develops a critical response to John Beatty’s recent (2006) engagement with Stephen Jay Gould’s claim that evolutionary history is contingent. Beatty identifies two senses of contingency in Gould’s work: an unpredictability sense and a causal dependence sense. He denies that Gould associates contingency with stochastic phenomena, such as drift. In reply to Beatty, this paper develops two main claims. The first is an interpretive claim: Gould really thinks of contingency has having to do with stochastic effects at the (...)
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  16.  25
    How Much Can We Know About the Causes of Evolutionary Trends?Derek D. Turner - 2009 - Biology and Philosophy 24 (3):341-357.
    One of the first questions that paleontologists ask when they identify a large-scale trend in the fossil record (e.g., size increase, complexity increase) is whether it is passive or driven. In this article, I explore two questions about driven trends: (1) what is the underlying cause or source of the directional bias? and (2) has the strength of the directional bias changed over time? I identify two underdetermination problems that prevent scientists from giving complete answers to these two questions.
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  17. Why Not NIMBY?Simon Feldman & Derek Turner - 2010 - Ethics, Place and Environment 13 (3):251-266.
    This paper examines a particularly egregious example of a NIMBY claim and considers three proposals for explaining what about that claim might be ethically problematic: The NIMBY claimant is being selfish or self-serving; The NIMBY claim cannot be morally justified, because respecting everyone's NIMBY claims leaves communities worse off; and if policymakers were to defer to people's NIMBY claims, they would end up perpetuating environmental injustices. We argue that these proposals fail to explain why there is anything wrong with the (...)
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  18.  38
    Philosophical Issues in Recent Paleontology.Derek D. Turner - 2014 - Philosophy Compass 9 (7):494-505.
    The distinction between idiographic science, which aims to reconstruct sequences of particular events, and nomothetic science, which aims to discover laws and regularities, is crucial for understanding the paleobiological revolution of the 1970s and 1980s. Stephen Jay Gould at times seemed conflicted about whether to say (a) that idiographic science is fine as it is or (b) that paleontology would have more credibility if it were more nomothetic. Ironically, one of the lasting results of the paleobiological revolution was a new (...)
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  19. Faith, Reason and the Existence of God.Denys Turner - 2004 - Cambridge University Press.
    The proposition that the existence of God is demonstrable by rational argument is doubted by nearly all philosophical opinion today and is thought by most Christian theologians to be incompatible with Christian faith. This book argues that, on the contrary, there are reasons of faith why in principle the existence of God should be thought rationally demonstrable and that it is worthwhile revisiting the theology of Thomas Aquinas to see why this is so. The book further suggests that philosophical objections (...)
     
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  20.  9
    Identity and National Identity.Qiang Liu & David Turner - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (12):1080-1088.
    This article reviews the history of international mobility of students from China to other countries over the century and a half from 1870 to the present day. Different motivations, goals, courses, and knowledge are considered, together with how the purposes of individuals have matched national policy. Implications for the future development in a globalized context are briefly considered.
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  21.  20
    How to Teach: Critical Thinking.Dale Turner - 2013 - Teaching Philosophy 36 (4):399-416.
    Starting with this issue, Teaching Philosophy will initiate a series of articles entitled “How to Teach.” The aim of these articles is to provide an overview of how to teach a particular course commonly offered in philosophy departments and programs, with the hope that the articles will assist those who are asked to teach a course unfamiliar to them. We welcome feedback about this series and the articles contained therein.—MC.
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  22. Thomas Aquinas: A Portrait.Denys Turner - 2013 - Yale University Press.
    Leaving so few traces of himself behind, Thomas Aquinas seems to defy the efforts of the biographer. Highly visible as a public teacher, preacher, and theologian, he nevertheless has remained nearly invisible as man and saint. What can be discovered about Thomas Aquinas as a whole? In this short, compelling portrait, Denys Turner clears away the haze of time and brings Thomas vividly to life for contemporary readers—those unfamiliar with the saint as well as those well acquainted with his teachings. (...)
     
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  23.  19
    Biases in the Selection of Candidate Species for De-Extinction.Derek D. Turner - 2017 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 20 (1):21-24.
    Entrenched biases in favour of large, charismatic mammals, towards predators, towards terrestrial animals and towards species that have cultural importance can influence the selection of candidate species for de-extinction research. Often, the species with the highest existence value will also be the ones that raise the most serious animal welfare concerns.
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  24.  8
    The Price of Truth: Herbert McCabe on Love Politics and Death.Denys Turner - 2017 - New Blackfriars 98 (1073):5-18.
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  25. Sensibility Theory and Conservative Complancency.Peter W. Ross & Dale Turner - 2005 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 86 (4):544–555.
    In Ruling Passions, Simon Blackburn contends that we should reject sensibility theory because it serves to support a conservative complacency. Blackburn's strategy is attractive in that it seeks to win this metaethical dispute – which ultimately stems from a deep disagreement over antireductionism – on the basis of an uncontroversial normative consideration. Therefore, Blackburn seems to offer an easy solution to an apparently intractable debate. We will show, however, that Blackburn's argument against sensibility theory does not succeed; it is no (...)
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  26. Neural Correlates of Single- and Dual-Task Walking in the Real World.Sara Pizzamiglio, Usman Naeem, Hassan Abdalla & Duncan L. Turner - 2017 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 11.
  27.  48
    Hypocrisy.Dan Turner - 1990 - Metaphilosophy 21 (3):262-269.
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  28.  20
    Reasoning Together: Temptations, Dangers, and Cautions.Chris Campolo & Dale Turner - 2002 - Argumentation 16 (1):3-19.
    In the appropriate contexts reasoning is a powerful tool for producing intersubjective agreement about what counts as the best answer to a question that generates inquiry; sometimes employing arguments can lead to agreement about what is the right answer. In this paper we hope to show, however, that unabashed optimism about the power of argument is misplaced. Such optimism rests on an implausible picture of the power of articulation. Sentences cashed out as reasons to believe another sentence is true cannot (...)
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  29.  52
    Folk Psychology and the Philosophy of Mind.Scott M. Christensen & Dale R. Turner (eds.) - 1993 - L. Erlbaum.
    Within the past ten years, the discussion of the nature of folk psychology and its role in explaining behavior and thought has become central to the philosophy of mind. However, no comprehensive account of the contemporary debate or collection of the works that make up this debate has yet been available. Intending to fill this gap, this volume begins with the crucial background for the contemporary debate and proceeds with a broad range of responses to and developments of these works (...)
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  30.  19
    The Art of Unknowing: Negative Theology in Late Medieval Mysticism.Denys Turner - 1998 - Modern Theology 14 (4):473-488.
  31.  13
    Just Another Drug? A Philosophical Assessment of Randomised Controlled Studies on Intercessory Prayer.D. D. Turner - 2006 - Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (8):487-490.
    The empirical results from recent randomised controlled studies on remote, intercessory prayer remain mixed. Several studies have, however, appeared in prestigious medical journals, and it is believed by many researchers, including apparent sceptics, that it makes sense to study intercessory prayer as if it were just another experimental drug treatment. This assumption is challenged by discussing problems posed by the need to obtain the informed consent of patients participating in the studies; pointing out that if the intercessors are indeed conscientious (...)
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  32.  4
    World Class Universities and International Rankings.Da Turner - 2013 - Ethics in Science and Environmental Politics 13 (2):167-176.
  33.  11
    Hypocrisy1.Dan Turner - 1990 - Metaphilosophy 21 (3):262-269.
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  34.  27
    The Past Vs. The Tiny: Historical Science and the Abductive Arguments for Realism.Derek D. Turner - 2004 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 35 (1):1-17.
    Scientific realism is fundamentally a view about unobservable things, events, processes, and so on, but things can be unobservable either because they are tiny or because they are past. The familiar abductive arguments for scientific realism lend more justification to scientific realism about the tiny than to realism about the past. This paper examines both the “basic” abductive arguments for realism advanced by philosophers such as Ian Hacking and Michael Devitt, as well as Richard Boyd’s version of the inference to (...)
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  35.  14
    Organoids and the Genetically Encoded Self-Assembly of Embryonic Stem Cells.David A. Turner, Peter Baillie-Johnson & Alfonso Martinez Arias - 2016 - Bioessays 38 (2):181-191.
  36.  4
    The Price of Truth: Herbert McCabe on Love Politics and Death.Denys Turner - 2016 - New Blackfriars 97 (1072).
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  37. "Environmental Ethics: Readings in Theory and Application," 6th Edition, Ed. Louis P. Pojman and Paul Pojman.Derek Turner - 2012 - Teaching Philosophy 35 (4):448-451.
  38. Appearance in This List Does Not Preclude a Future Review of the Book. Where They Are Known Prices Are Either Given in $ US or in£ UK. Alcoff, Linda and Potter, Elizabeth (Eds.), Feminist Epistemologies, London, UK, Rout-Ledge, 1993, Pp. 312,£ 35.00,£ 12.99. [REVIEW]Ian Angus, Lenore Langsdorf, S. Atran, Robert M. Baird, Stuart E. Rosembaum, C. Bonelli Munegato, Scott M. Christensen, Dale R. Turner, Bohdan Dziemidok & Peter Engelmann - 1993 - Mind 102:406.
  39.  11
    Speculation in the Historical Sciences.Derek Turner - 2019 - Philosophy, Theory, and Practice in Biology 11.
    In Rock, Bone, and Ruin, Adrian Currie offers an account of how historically oriented researchers in paleontology, archaeology, and the geosciences make the most out of their epistemically unlucky circumstances. He argues that there are three things, in particular, that can help scientists gain traction in unlucky circumstances: methodological omnivory, epistemic scaffolding, and “empirically grounded speculation”. Together, these three aspects of the practice of historical science help explain its successes. I largely agree with Currie’s account of methodological omnivory and epistemic (...)
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  40.  37
    The Functions of Fossils: Inference and Explanation in Functional Morphology.D. Turner - 2000 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 31 (1):193-212.
    This paper offers an account of the relationship between inference and explanation in functional morphology which combines Robert Brandon's theory of adaptation explanation with standard accounts of inference to the best explanation. Inferences of function from structure, it is argued, are inferences to the best adaptation explanation. There are, however, three different approaches to the problem of determining which adaptation explanation is the best. The theory of inference to the best adaptation explanation is then applied to a case study from (...)
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  41. Another Algorithm for Bracket Abstraction.D. A. Turner - 1979 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 44 (2):267-270.
  42. The Evesham Psalter.D. H. Turner - 1964 - Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 27:23-41.
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  43.  39
    Sic Transitivity.John Post & Derek Turner - 2000 - Journal of Philosophical Research 25:67-82.
    In order to defend the regress argument for foundationalism against Post’s objection that relevant forms of inferential justification are not transitive, Lydia McGrew and Timothy McGrew define a relation E of positive evidence, which, they contend, has the following features: It is a necessary condition for any inferential justification; it is transitive and irreflexive; and it enables both a strengthened regress argument proof against Post’s objection and an argument that nothing can ever appear in its own justificational ancestry. In reply, (...)
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  44.  30
    How to Teach.Dale Turner - 2013 - Teaching Philosophy 36 (4):399-416.
    Starting with this issue, Teaching Philosophy will initiate a series of articles entitled “How to Teach.” The aim of these articles is to provide an overview of how to teach a particular course commonly offered in philosophy departments and programs, with the hope that the articles will assist those who are asked to teach a course unfamiliar to them. We welcome feedback about this series and the articles contained therein.—MC.
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  45.  9
    Why Not NIMBY?Simon Feldman & Derek Turner - 2014 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 17 (1):105-115.
    This paper develops responses to several critics who commented on an earlier paper that we published in this journal. In that paper, we argued that there is nothing necessarily wrong with NIMBY claims or those who make them. The critics raised some important issues, such as whether “NIMBY” is essentially a pejorative term; the possibility that NIMBY claimants are saying something deep about the noncomparability of places; what exactly it means for policy makers to defer to a NIMBY claim; the (...)
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  46.  62
    On Denying the Right God: Aquinas on Atheism and Idolatry.Denys Turner - 2004 - Modern Theology 20 (1):141-161.
  47.  28
    Introduction: Deep Disagreement Re-Examined.Dale Turner & Chris Campolo - 2005 - Informal Logic 25 (1):1-2.
  48.  21
    Misleading Observable Analogues in Paleontology.Derek Turner - 2005 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 36 (1):175-183.
    Carman argues, in ‘The electrons of the dinosaurs and the center of the Earth’, that we may have more reason to be realists about dinosaurs than about electrons, because there are plenty of observable analogues for dinosaurs but not for electrons. These observable analogues severely restrict the range of plausible ontologies, thus reducing the threat of underdetermination. In response to this argument, I show that the observable analogues for ancient organisms are a mixed epistemic blessing at best, and I discuss (...)
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  49.  6
    Fallacies and the Concept of an Argument.Dale Turner - 1999 - Dissertation, University of California, Riverside
    This dissertation argues that recent theoretical attempts to understand fallacious reasoning fail because these theories presuppose problematic accounts of the nature of argument. Current fallacy theories agree that a fallacy is a mistake, but differ wildly about what sort of mistake it is. Chapters one through three explore three very different suggestions. Chapter one is devoted to an examination of the oldest of the modern theoretical accounts of fallacious reasoning, what Hamblin calls the standard treatment. Chapter two begins with a (...)
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  50.  7
    Emmanuel Levinas's Non-Existent God.Donald L. Turner & Ford J. Turrell - 2013 - In Jeanine Diller & Asa Kasher (eds.), Models of God and Alternative Ultimate Realities. Springer. pp. 727--733.
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