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Dominic Wilkinson [34]D. H. Wilkinson [24]D. Wilkinson [11]David Wilkinson [6]
Dr Robert Wilkinson [5]Dominic J. C. Wilkinson [3]David G. Wilkinson [3]D. Adrian Wilkinson [2]

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Profile: David Wilkinson (Addis Ababa University)
  1.  38
    A Life Worth Giving? The Threshold for Permissible Withdrawal of Life Support From Disabled Newborn Infants.Dominic James Wilkinson - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (2):20 - 32.
    When is it permissible to allow a newborn infant to die on the basis of their future quality of life? The prevailing official view is that treatment may be withdrawn only if the burdens in an infant's future life outweigh the benefits. In this paper I outline and defend an alternative view. On the Threshold View, treatment may be withdrawn from infants if their future well-being is below a threshold that is close to, but above the zero-point of well-being. I (...)
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  2.  6
    Functional Neuroimaging and Withdrawal of Life-Sustaining Treatment From Vegetative Patients.D. J. Wilkinson, G. Kahane, M. Horne & J. Savulescu - 2009 - Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (8):508-511.
    Recent studies using functional magnetic resonance imaging of patients in a vegetative state have raised the possibility that such patients retain some degree of consciousness. In this paper, the ethical implications of such findings are outlined, in particular in relation to decisions about withdrawing life-sustaining treatment. It is sometimes assumed that if there is evidence of consciousness, treatment should not be withdrawn. But, paradoxically, the discovery of consciousness in very severely brain-damaged patients may provide more reason to let them die. (...)
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  3.  8
    Harm Isn't All You Need: Parental Discretion and Medical Decisions for a Child: Table 1.Dominic Wilkinson & Tara Nair - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (2):116-118.
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  4.  17
    Is It in the Best Interests of an Intellectually Disabled Infant to Die?D. Wilkinson - 2006 - Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (8):454-459.
    One of the most contentious ethical issues in the neonatal intensive care unit is the withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment from infants who may otherwise survive. In practice, one of the most important factors influencing this decision is the prediction that the infant will be severely intellectually disabled. Most professional guidelines suggest that decisions should be made on the basis of the best interests of the infant. It is, however, not clear how intellectual disability affects those interests. Why should intellectual disability (...)
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  5. A Costly Separation Between Withdrawing and Withholding Treatment in Intensive Care.Dominic Wilkinson & Julian Savulescu - 2014 - Bioethics 28 (3):127-137.
    Ethical analyses, professional guidelines and legal decisions support the equivalence thesis for life-sustaining treatment: if it is ethical to withhold treatment, it would be ethical to withdraw the same treatment. In this paper we explore reasons why the majority of medical professionals disagree with the conclusions of ethical analysis. Resource allocation is considered by clinicians to be a legitimate reason to withhold but not to withdraw intensive care treatment. We analyse five arguments in favour of non-equivalence, and find only relatively (...)
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  6.  47
    The Self-Fulfilling Prophecy in Intensive Care.Dominic Wilkinson - 2009 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 30 (6):401-410.
    Predictions of poor prognosis for critically ill patients may become self-fulfilling if life-sustaining treatment or resuscitation is subsequently withheld on the basis of that prediction. This paper outlines the epistemic and normative problems raised by self-fulfilling prophecies (SFPs) in intensive care. Where predictions affect outcome, it can be extremely difficult to ascertain the mortality rate for patients if all treatment were provided. SFPs may lead to an increase in mortality for cohorts of patients predicted to have poor prognosis, they may (...)
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  7.  24
    Searching for Another Earth: The Recent History of the Discovery of Exoplanets.David Wilkinson - 2016 - Zygon 51 (2):414-430.
    The discovery of exoplanets is a small part of the array of scientific arguments for and against the existence of extraterrestrial intelligence. Yet the recent stunning achievement of this program of observational astronomy has had a significant effect on scientific opinion and public interest. It also raises some key theological questions. New observing techniques are leading to the discovery of extrasolar planets daily. Earth-like planets outside of our Solar System can now be identified and in future years explored for signs (...)
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  8. Should We Allow Organ Donation Euthanasia? Alternatives for Maximizing the Number and Quality of Organs for Transplantation.Dominic Wilkinson & Julian Savulescu - 2012 - Bioethics 26 (1):32-48.
    There are not enough solid organs available to meet the needs of patients with organ failure. Thousands of patients every year die on the waiting lists for transplantation. Yet there is one currently available, underutilized, potential source of organs. Many patients die in intensive care following withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment whose organs could be used to save the lives of others. At present the majority of these organs go to waste.In this paper we consider and evaluate a range of ways (...)
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  9.  11
    Is It Better to Be Minimally Conscious Than Vegetative?D. Wilkinson & J. Savulescu - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (9):557-558.
    In the case of Re M, summarised in the paper by Julian Sheather, Justice Baker faced the difficult task of weighing up objectively whether or not it was in Mâs best interests to withdraw artificial feeding and to let her die.1 The judge concluded that M was ârecognisably aliveâ, and that the advantages of continued life outweighed the disadvantages. He compared her minimally conscious state favourably to that of a persistent vegetative state .2 It was clear that artificial feeding would (...)
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  10.  11
    Death or Disability?: The 'Carmentis Machine' and Decision-Making for Critically Ill Children.Dominic Wilkinson - 2013 - Oxford University Press.
    Death and grief in the ancient world -- Predictions and disability in Rome.
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  11. Death or Disability?: The 'Carmentis Machine' and Decision-Making for Critically Ill Children.Dominic Wilkinson - 2013 - Oxford University Press UK.
     
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  12.  18
    Consequentialism and the Death Penalty.Dominic Wilkinson & Thomas Douglas - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (10):56-58.
  13.  4
    Shades of Grey.D. J. C. Wilkinson - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (10):671-672.
  14.  2
    Making the Cut: Analytical and Empirical Bioethics.Dominic Wilkinson - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (9):581-582.
    This issue of the journal includes papers across both analytical and empirical schools within bioethics.In his feature article, ‘The kindest cut? Surgical castration, sex offenders and coercive offers’, John McMillan asks whether surgical castration can be ethically provided as medical treatment for sex offenders . While surgical castration has previously been available in a number of European countries, in recent years it has only been available in the Czech Republic and in Germany. The European Committee for the Prevention of Torture (...)
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  15.  4
    Hard Lessons: Learning From the Charlie Gard Case.Dominic Wilkinson & Julian Savulescu - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics:medethics-2017-104492.
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  16.  8
    Antenatal Diagnosis of Trisomy 18, Harm and Parental Choice.Dominic J. C. Wilkinson - 2010 - Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (11):644-645.
    In this commentary I assess the possible harms to a fetus with trisomy 18 of continued life. I argue that, although there is good reason to avoid subjecting infants to major surgery and prolonged intensive care where there is little chance of benefit, doctors should support and engage honestly with parents who decide to continue their pregnancies. We should ensure that infants with trisomy 18 have access to high quality palliative care.
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  17.  2
    What has Philosophy Got to Do It? Conflicting Views and Values in End-of-Life Care.Dominic Wilkinson - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (9):591-592.
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  18.  28
    The Window of Opportunity: Decision Theory and the Timing of Prognostic Tests for Newborn Infants.Dominic Wilkinson - 2009 - Bioethics 23 (9):503-514.
    In many forms of severe acute brain injury there is an early phase when prognosis is uncertain, followed later by physiological recovery and the possibility of more certain predictions of future impairment. There may be a window of opportunity for withdrawal of life support early, but if decisions are delayed there is the risk that the patient will survive with severe impairment. In this paper I focus on the example of neonatal encephalopathy and the question of the timing of prognostic (...)
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  19.  12
    Which Newborn Infants Are Too Expensive to Treat? Camosy and Rationing in Intensive Care.D. Wilkinson - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (8):502-506.
    Are there some newborn infants whose short- and long-term care costs are so great that treatment should not be provided and they should be allowed to die? Public discourse and academic debate about the ethics of newborn intensive care has often shied away from this question. There has been enough ink spilt over whether or when for the infant's sake it might be better not to provide life-saving treatment. The further question of not saving infants because of inadequate resources has (...)
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  20.  2
    Ventilating the Debate: Elective Ventilation Revisited.D. Wilkinson - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (3):127-128.
    This issue of the Journal of Medical Ethics features a special symposium on ‘elective ventilation’ . EV ) was originally described in the 1990s by doctors working in Exeter in the UK.1 At that time there was concern about the large shortfall in organs for transplantation. Patients could become organ donors if they were diagnosed as being brain dead, but this only ever occurred in patients on breathing machines in intensive care who developed signs of brainstem failure. Doctors wondered if (...)
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  21.  5
    Schrodinger's Fetus.Dominic Wilkinson - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (1):1-1.
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  22.  7
    How Much Weight Should We Give to Parental Interests in Decisions About Life Support for Newborn Infants?Dominic Wilkinson - 2011 - Monash Bioethics Review 29 (2):13-1.
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  23.  1
    Conscientious Non-Objection in Intensive Care.Dominic Wilkinson - 2017 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 26 (1):132-142.
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  24.  14
    Challenging the Status Quo.Dominic Wilkinson - 2009 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (2):235-237.
    Harold Jaffe argues that we should adopt opt-out testing for HIV. There are paternalistic and utilitarian arguments for such an approach. In this commentary I draw attention to some similarities between his arguments and debates about opt-out systems of organ donation. I argue that the status quo bias provides both part of the reason that opt-out approaches work, and an explanation for why such approaches are sometimes resisted.
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  25.  29
    Double Trouble: Should Double Embryo Transfer Be Banned?Dominic Wilkinson, G. Owen Schaefer, Kelton Tremellen & Julian Savulescu - 2015 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 36 (2):121-139.
    What role should legislation or policy play in avoiding the complications of in-vitro fertilization? In this article, we focus on single versus double embryo transfer, and assess three arguments in favour of mandatory single embryo transfer: risks to the mother, risks to resultant children, and costs to society. We highlight significant ethical concerns about each of these. Reproductive autonomy and non-paternalism are strong enough to outweigh the health concerns for the woman. Complications due to non-identity cast doubt on the extent (...)
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  26.  19
    “Neglected Personhood” and Neglected Questions: Remarks on the Moral Significance of Consciousness.Dominic Wilkinson, Guy Kahane & Julian Savulescu - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (9):31 – 33.
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  27.  22
    Author Q & A.Dominic Wilkinson - 2013 - The Philosophers' Magazine 62 (62):125-126.
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  28. XII. Radiative Transitions in Light Elements: II.D. H. Wilkinson - 1956 - Philosophical Magazine 1 (2):127-152.
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  29.  18
    In Favour of Medical Dissensus: Why We Should Agree to Disagree About End‐of‐Life Decisions.Dominic Wilkinson, Robert Truog & Julian Savulescu - 2016 - Bioethics 30 (2):109-118.
    End-of-life decision-making is controversial. There are different views about when it is appropriate to limit life-sustaining treatment, and about what palliative options are permissible. One approach to decisions of this nature sees consensus as crucial. Decisions to limit treatment are made only if all or a majority of caregivers agree. We argue, however, that it is a mistake to require professional consensus in end-of-life decisions. In the first part of the article we explore practical, ethical, and legal factors that support (...)
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  30.  12
    Protecting Future Children From In‐Utero Harm.Dominic Wilkinson, Loane Skene, Lachlan de Crespigny & Julian Savulescu - 2016 - Bioethics 30 (6):425-432.
    The actions of pregnant women can cause harm to their future children. However, even if the possible harm is serious and likely to occur, the law will generally not intervene. A pregnant woman is an autonomous person who is entitled to make her own decisions. A fetus in-utero has no legal right to protection. In striking contrast, the child, if born alive, may sue for injury in-utero; and the child is entitled to be protected by being removed from her parents (...)
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  31.  18
    Balancing Obligations: Should Written Information About Life-Sustaining Treatment Be Neutral?V. Xafis, D. Wilkinson, L. Gillam & J. Sullivan - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (3):234-239.
    Parents who are facing decisions about life-sustaining treatment for their seriously ill or dying child are supported by their child's doctors and nurses. They also frequently seek other information sources to help them deal with the medical and ethical questions that arise. This might include written or web-based information. As part of a project involving the development of such a resource to support parents facing difficult decisions, some ethical questions emerged. Should this information be presented in a strictly neutral fashion? (...)
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  32. XXXVII. Isotopic Spin Selection Rules. VII: Breakdown of the Rules and the Situation inl6O.D. H. Wilkinson - 1956 - Philosophical Magazine 1 (5):379-392.
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  33. XXVI. Isotopic Spin Relection Rules-VI: The 6·88 Mev State of10B.D. H. Wilkinson & A. B. Clegg - 1956 - Philosophical Magazine 1 (3):291-297.
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  34.  30
    Selling Organs and Souls: Should the State Prohibit 'Demeaning' Practices? [REVIEW]Dominic J. C. Wilkinson - 2004 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 1 (1):27-31.
    It is sometimes argued that practices such as organ-selling should be prohibited because they are demeaning to the individuals involved. In this article the plausibility of such an argument is questioned. I will examine what it means to demean or be demeaned, and suggest that the mere fact that an individual is demeaning themself does not provide sufficient justification for legal prohibition. On the contrary, such laws might be argued to be demeaning.
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  35.  2
    Rationing Conscience.Dominic Wilkinson - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (4):226-229.
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  36.  10
    Civilizations as Networks: Trade, War, Diplomacy, and Command-Control.D. Wilkinson - 2002 - Complexity 8 (1):82-86.
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  37.  12
    Disability, Discrimination and Death : Is It Justified to Ration Life Saving Treatment for Disabled Newborn Infants?Dominic Wilkinson & Julian Savulescu - unknown
    Disability might be relevant to decisions about life support in intensive care in several ways. It might affect the chance of treatment being successful, or a patient’s life expectancy with treatment. It may affect whether treatment is in a patient’s best interests. However, even if treatment would be of overall benefit it may be unaffordable and consequently unable to be provided. In this paper we will draw on the example of neonatal intensive care, and ask whether or when it is (...)
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  38.  16
    Precision and the Rules of Prioritization.John Mcmillan, Tony Hope & Dominic Wilkinson - 2013 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 22 (4):336-345.
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  39.  21
    Should We Replace Disabled Newborn Infants?Dominic Wilkinson - 2011 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 8 (3):390-414.
    If a disabled newborn infant dies, her parents may be able to conceive another child without impairment. This is sometimes referred to as 'replacement'. Some philosophers have argued that replacement provides a strong reason for disabled newborns to be killed or allowed to die. In this paper I focus on the case for replacement as it relates to decisions about life support in newborn intensive care. I argue (following Jeff McMahan) that the impersonal reason to replace is weak and easily (...)
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  40.  3
    Isotopic Spin Selection Rules IX: The 9.58 MeV State of16O.S. D. Bloom, B. J. Toppel & D. H. Wilkinson - 1957 - Philosophical Magazine 2 (13):57-60.
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  41.  1
    The Breakdown of Parity Conservation in the Π-Μ-E Decay and a Test of the Two Component Neutrino Theory.G. B. Chadwick, S. A. Durrani, L. M. Eisberg, P. B. Jones, J. W. G. Wignall & D. H. Wilkinson - 1957 - Philosophical Magazine 2 (17):684-693.
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  42.  17
    Three Myths in End-of-Life Care.D. Wilkinson - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (6):389-390.
    Huang and colleagues provide some intriguing insights into the attitudes about end of life care of practising Taiwanese neonatal doctors and nurses.1 There are some similarities with surveys from other parts of the world. Most Taiwanese neonatologists and nurses agreed that it was potentially appropriate to withhold or limit treatment for infants who were dying. A very high proportion was opposed to active euthanasia of such infants. But there were also some striking differences. Only 21% of Taiwanese doctors ‘agreed’ with (...)
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  43.  5
    Ethical Dilemmas in Postnatal Treatment of Severe Congenital Hydrocephalus.Dominic Wilkinson - 2016 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 25 (1):84-92.
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  44.  2
    Observations of K−-Meson Interactions in Nuclear Emulsion.G. B. Chadwick, S. A. Durrani, P. B. Jones, J. W. G. Wignall & D. H. Wilkinson - 1958 - Philosophical Magazine 3 (35):1193-1212.
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  45.  1
    How Can You Be Transparent About Labeling the Living as Dead?David Rodríguez-Arias, Dominic Wilkinson & Stuart Youngner - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (5):24-25.
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  46.  7
    Stabilizing the Regionalisation of the Developing Vertebrate Central Nervous System.Andrea Pasini & David G. Wilkinson - 2002 - Bioessays 24 (5):427-438.
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  47.  1
    XCVIII. The reaction9Be 12C.D. B. James, G. A. Jones & D. H. Wilkinson - 1956 - Philosophical Magazine 1 (10):949-963.
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  48.  5
    Ethical Language and Decision-Making for Prenatally Diagnosed Lethal Malformations.Dominic Wilkinson, Lachlan De Crespigny & Vicki Xafis - unknown
    In clinical practice, and in the medical literature, severe congenital malformations such as trisomy 18, anencephaly, and renal agenesis are frequently referred to as ‘lethal’ or as ‘incompatible with life’. However, there is no agreement about a definition of lethal malformations, nor which conditions should be included in this category. Review of outcomes for malformations commonly designated ‘lethal’ reveals that prolonged survival is possible, even if rare. This article analyses the concept of lethal malformations and compares it to the problematic (...)
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  49.  1
    Cost-Equivalence and Pluralism in Publicly-Funded Health-Care Systems.Dominic Wilkinson & Julian Savulescu - forthcoming - Health Care Analysis:1-23.
    Clinical guidelines summarise available evidence on medical treatment, and provide recommendations about the most effective and cost-effective options for patients with a given condition. However, sometimes patients do not desire the best available treatment. Should doctors in a publicly-funded healthcare system ever provide sub-optimal medical treatment? On one view, it would be wrong to do so, since this would violate the ethical principle of beneficence, and predictably lead to harm for patients. It would also, potentially, be a misuse of finite (...)
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  50.  5
    The “Research Misconception” and the SUPPORT Trial: Toward Evidence-Based Consensus.Dominic J. C. Wilkinson, Nicole Gerrand, Melinda Cruz & William Tarnow-Mordi - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (12):48-50.
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