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  1.  59
    Internal Sanctions in Mill's Moral Psychology: Dale E. Miller.Dale E. Miller - 1998 - Utilitas 10 (1):68-82.
    Mill's discussion of ‘the internal sanction’ in chapter III of Utilitarianism does not do justice to his understanding of internal sanctions; it omits some important points and obscures others. I offer an account of this portion of his moral psychology of motivation which brings out its subtleties and complexities. I show that he recognizes the importance of internal sanctions as sources of motives to develop and perfect our characters, as well as of motives to do our duty, and I examine (...)
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  2.  5
    India House Utilitarianism: A First Look.Ben Eggleston & Dale E. Miller - 2007 - Southwest Philosophy Review 23 (1):39-47.
  3.  9
    Mill's Misleading Moral Mathematics.Ben Eggleston & Dale E. Miller - 2008 - Southwest Philosophy Review 24 (1):153-161.
  4.  18
    Mill’s Act-Utilitarian Interpreters on Utilitarianism Chapter V Paragraph 14.Dale E. Miller - 2017 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 47 (5):674-693.
    In the fourteenth paragraph of the fifth chapter of Utilitarianism, J. S. Mill writes that ‘We do not call anything wrong, unless we mean to imply that a person ought to be punished in some way or other for doing it; if not by law, by the opinion of his fellow-creatures; if not by opinion, by the reproaches of his own conscience.’ I criticize the attempts of three commentators who have recently presented act-utilitarian readings of Mill – Roger Crisp, David (...)
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  5.  3
    Compunction, Second-Personal Morality, and Moral Reasons.Dale E. Miller - 2018 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 21 (3):719-733.
    In The Second-Person Standpoint and subsequent essays, Stephen Darwall develops an account of morality that is “second-personal” in virtue of holding that what we are morally obligated to do is what others can legitimately demand that we do, i.e., what they can hold us accountable for doing through moral reactive attitudes like blame. Similarly, what it would be wrong for us to do is what others can legitimately demand that we abstain from doing. As part of this account, Darwall argues (...)
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  6.  5
    Reparations for Emancipation: Mill’s Vindication of the Rights of Slave Owners.Dale E. Miller - 2005 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 43 (2):245-265.
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  7.  4
    No Title Available: Book Reviews. [REVIEW]Dale E. Miller - 2000 - Utilitas 12 (2):241-243.
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  8.  3
    Utilitarianism and the Headache That Just Won't Go Away: Reply to Cain.Dale E. Miller - 2006 - Southwest Philosophy Review 22 (2):147-149.
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  9.  2
    Terminating Employees for Their Political Speech.Dale E. Miller - 2004 - Business and Society Review 109 (2):225-243.
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  10. Reluctant Florists, Same-Sex Weddings, and Mill’s Doctrine of Liberty.Dale E. Miller - 2016 - Public Affairs Quarterly 30 (4):287-311.
     
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