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Dale Hammerschmidt [4]Dale E. Hammerschmidt [2]
  1.  57
    Managing Incidental Findings in Human Subjects Research: Analysis and Recommendations.Susan M. Wolf, Frances P. Lawrenz, Charles A. Nelson, Jeffrey P. Kahn, Mildred K. Cho, Ellen Wright Clayton, Joel G. Fletcher, Michael K. Georgieff, Dale Hammerschmidt, Kathy Hudson, Judy Illes, Vivek Kapur, Moira A. Keane, Barbara A. Koenig, Bonnie S. LeRoy, Elizabeth G. McFarland, Jordan Paradise, Lisa S. Parker, Sharon F. Terry, Brian Van Ness & Benjamin S. Wilfond - 2008 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (2):219-248.
    No consensus yet exists on how to handle incidental fnd-ings in human subjects research. Yet empirical studies document IFs in a wide range of research studies, where IFs are fndings beyond the aims of the study that are of potential health or reproductive importance to the individual research participant. This paper reports recommendations of a two-year project group funded by NIH to study how to manage IFs in genetic and genomic research, as well as imaging research. We conclude that researchers (...)
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  2.  67
    The Limitations of "Vulnerability" as a Protection for Human Research Participants.Carol Levine, Ruth Faden, Christine Grady, Dale Hammerschmidt, Lisa Eckenwiler & Jeremy Sugarman - 2004 - American Journal of Bioethics 4 (3):44 – 49.
    Vulnerability is one of the least examined concepts in research ethics. Vulnerability was linked in the Belmont Report to questions of justice in the selection of subjects. Regulations and policy documents regarding the ethical conduct of research have focused on vulnerability in terms of limitations of the capacity to provide informed consent. Other interpretations of vulnerability have emphasized unequal power relationships between politically and economically disadvantaged groups and investigators or sponsors. So many groups are now considered to be vulnerable in (...)
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  3.  27
    Dealing With the Long-Term Social Implications of Research.Jeremy Sugarman, Dale E. Hammerschmidt, Christine Grady, Lisa Eckenwiler, Carol Levine & Alan Fleischman - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (5):5-9.
    Biomedical and behavioral research may affect strongly held social values and thereby create significant controversy over whether such research should be permitted in the first place. Institutional review boards responsible for protecting the rights and welfare of participants in research are sometimes faced with review of protocols that have significant implications for social policy and the potential for negative social consequences. Although IRB members often raise concerns about potential long-term social implications in protocol review, federal regulations strongly discourage IRBs from (...)
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  4.  38
    A Response to Commentators on “The Limitations of 'Vulnerability' as a Protection for Human Research Participants”.Carol Levine, Ruth Faden, Christine Grady, Dale Hammerschmidt, Lisa Eckenwiler & Jeremy Sugarman - 2004 - American Journal of Bioethics 4 (3):W32-W32.
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  5.  12
    Requiring Consent Vs. Waiving Consent for Medical Records Research: A Minnesota Law Vs. The U.S. (HIPAA) Privacy Rule.Beverly Woodward & Dale Hammerschmidt - 2003 - Health Care Analysis 11 (3):207-218.
    The use of medical records in research can yield information that is difficult to obtain by other means. When such records are released to investigators in identifiable form, however, substantial privacy and confidentiality risks may be created. These risks become more common and more serious as medical records move to an electronic format. In 1996, the state of Minnesota enacted legislation with respect to consent requirements for the use of medical records in research. This legislation has been widely criticized because—it (...)
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  6.  26
    " There is No Substantive Due Process Right to Conduct Human-Subject Research": The Saga of the Minnesota Gamma Hydroxybutyrate Study.Dale E. Hammerschmidt - 1996 - IRB: Ethics & Human Research 19 (3-4):13-15.
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