Results for 'Dale Sanders'

999 found
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  1.  3
    Calcium Channels and Signal Transduction in Plant Cells.Eva Johannes, James M. Brosnan & Dale Sanders - 1991 - Bioessays 13 (7):331-336.
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  2.  13
    Dale Metrical Analyses of Tragic Choruses. 3. Dochmiac—Iambic—Dactylic—Ionic. London: Institute of Classical Studies. 1983. Pp. Xii + 336. £22.00. [REVIEW]M. L. West & A. M. Dale - 1984 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 104:227-228.
  3.  9
    Euripides. Alcestis. Ed. With Introduction and Commentary by A. M. Dale. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1954. Pp. Xl + 130. 12s. 6d. [REVIEW]John G. Griffith & A. M. Dale - 1957 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 77 (2):326-326.
  4. An Ontology of Affordances.John T. Sanders - 1997 - Ecological Psychology 9 (1):97-112.
    I argue that the most promising approach to understanding J.J. Gibson's "affordances" takes affordances themselves as ontological primitives, instead of treating them as dispositional properties of more primitive things, events, surfaces, or substances. These latter are best treated as coalescences of affordances present in the environment (or "coalescences of use-potential," as in Sanders (1994) and Hilditch (1995)). On this view, even the ecological approach's stress on the complementary organism/environment pair is seen as expressing a particular affordance relation between the (...)
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  5.  12
    Reverse-Engineering Reverse Mathematics.Sam Sanders - 2013 - Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 164 (5):528-541.
    An important open problem in Reverse Mathematics is the reduction of the first-order strength of the base theory from IΣ1IΣ1 to IΔ0+expIΔ0+exp. The system ERNA, a version of Nonstandard Analysis based on the system IΔ0+expIΔ0+exp, provides a partial solution to this problem. Indeed, weak Königʼs lemma and many of its equivalent formulations from Reverse Mathematics can be ‘pushed down’ into ERNA, while preserving the equivalences, but at the price of replacing equality with ‘≈’, i.e. infinitesimal proximity . The logical principle (...)
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  6.  22
    The Dirac Delta Function in Two Settings of Reverse Mathematics.Sam Sanders & Keita Yokoyama - 2012 - Archive for Mathematical Logic 51 (1-2):99-121.
    The program of Reverse Mathematics (Simpson 2009) has provided us with the insight that most theorems of ordinary mathematics are either equivalent to one of a select few logical principles, or provable in a weak base theory. In this paper, we study the properties of the Dirac delta function (Dirac 1927; Schwartz 1951) in two settings of Reverse Mathematics. In particular, we consider the Dirac Delta Theorem, which formalizes the well-known property ${\int_\mathbb{R}f(x)\delta(x)\,dx=f(0)}$ of the Dirac delta function. We show that (...)
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  7.  13
    Philosophy of TV Noir.Aeon J. Skoble & Steven M. Sanders - unknown
    Film noir reflects the fatalistic themes and visual style of hard-boiled novelists and many émigré filmmakers in 1940s and 1950s America, emphasizing crime, alienation, and moral ambiguity. In The Philosophy of TV Noir, Steven M. Sanders and Aeon J. Skoble argue that the legacy of film noir classics such as The Maltese Falcon, Kiss Me Deadly, and The Big Sleep is also found in episodic television from the mid-1950s to the present. In this first-of-its-kind collection, contributors from philosophy, film (...)
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  8. Soul and Form.John T. Sanders, Katie Terezakis & Anna Bostock (eds.) - 2010 - Cambridge University Press.
    György Lukacs was a Hungarian Marxist philosopher, writer, and literary critic who shaped mainstream European Communist thought. _Soul and Form_ was his first book, published in 1910, and it established his reputation, treating questions of linguistic expressivity and literary style in the works of Plato, Kierkegaard, Novalis, Sterne, and others. By isolating the formal techniques these thinkers developed, Lukács laid the groundwork for his later work in Marxist aesthetics, a field that introduced the historical and political implications of text. For (...)
     
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  9.  84
    Sanders' Analytic Rebuttal To Polanyi's Critics, With Some Musings On Polanyi's Idea of Truth.Dale Cannon - 1996 - Tradition and Discovery 23 (3):17-23.
    This article reviews Michael Polanyi’s Post-Critical Epistemology by Andy F. Sanders but goes on to articulate certain crucial aspects of Polanyi’s post-critical understanding of truth that seem to be overlooked in Sanders’ account and which challenge conventional analyses of truth.
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  10. On the Morality of Artificial Agents.Luciano Floridi & J. W. Sanders - 2004 - Minds and Machines 14 (3):349-379.
    Artificial agents (AAs), particularly but not only those in Cyberspace, extend the class of entities that can be involved in moral situations. For they can be conceived of as moral patients (as entities that can be acted upon for good or evil) and also as moral agents (as entities that can perform actions, again for good or evil). In this paper, we clarify the concept of agent and go on to separate the concerns of morality and responsibility of agents (most (...)
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  11. Explanatory Pluralism in Cognitive Science.Rick Dale, Eric Dietrich & Anthony Chemero - 2009 - Cognitive Science 33 (2):739-742.
    This brief commentary has three goals. The first is to argue that ‘‘framework debate’’ in cognitive science is unresolvable. The idea that one theory or framework can singly account for the vast complexity and variety of cognitive processes seems unlikely if not impossible. The second goal is a consequence of this: We should consider how the various theories on offer work together in diverse contexts of investigation. A final goal is to supply a brief review for readers who are compelled (...)
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  12.  56
    Considerations in Ethical Decision-Making and Software Piracy.Suzanne C. Wagner & G. Lawrence Sanders - 2001 - Journal of Business Ethics 29 (1-2):161 - 167.
    Individuals are faced with the many opportunities to pirate. The decision to pirate or not may be related to an individual''s attitudes toward other ethical issues. A person''s ethical and moral predispositions and the judgments that they use to make decisions may be consistent across various ethical dilemmas and may indicate their likelihood to pirate software. This paper investigates the relationship between religion and a theoretical ethical decision making process that an individual uses when evaluating ethical or unethical situations. An (...)
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  13. Merleau-Ponty, Gibson and the Materiality of Meaning.John T. Sanders - 1993 - Man and World 26 (3):287-302.
    While there are numerous differences between the approaches taken by Maurice Merleau-Ponty and James J. Gibson, the basic motivation of the two thinkers, as well as the internal logic of their respective views, is extraordinarily close. Both were guided throughout their lives by an attempt to overcome the dualism of subject and object, and both devoted considerable attention to their "Gestaltist" predecessors. There can be no doubt but that it is largely because of this common cause that the subsequent development (...)
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  14.  83
    Artificial Evil and the Foundation of Computer Ethics.Luciano Floridi & J. W. Sanders - 2001 - Ethics and Information Technology 3 (1):55-66.
    Moral reasoning traditionally distinguishes two types of evil:moral (ME) and natural (NE). The standard view is that ME is theproduct of human agency and so includes phenomena such as war,torture and psychological cruelty; that NE is the product ofnonhuman agency, and so includes natural disasters such asearthquakes, floods, disease and famine; and finally, that morecomplex cases are appropriately analysed as a combination of MEand NE. Recently, as a result of developments in autonomousagents in cyberspace, a new class of interesting and (...)
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  15. Why the Numbers Should Sometimes Count.John T. Sanders - 1988 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 17 (1):3-14.
    John Taurek has argued that, where choices must be made between alternatives that affect different numbers of people, the numbers are not, by themselves, morally relevant. This is because we "must" take "losses-to" the persons into account (and these don't sum), but "must not" consider "losses-of" persons (because we must not treat persons like objects). I argue that the numbers are always ethically relevant, and that they may sometimes be the decisive consideration.
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  16.  47
    Mapping the Foundationalist Debate in Computer Ethics.Luciano Floridi & J. W. Sanders - 2002 - Ethics and Information Technology 4 (1):1-9.
    The paper provides a critical review of thedebate on the foundations of Computer Ethics(CE). Starting from a discussion of Moor'sclassic interpretation of the need for CEcaused by a policy and conceptual vacuum, fivepositions in the literature are identified anddiscussed: the ``no resolution approach'',according to which CE can have no foundation;the professional approach, according to whichCE is solely a professional ethics; the radicalapproach, according to which CE deals withabsolutely unique issues, in need of a uniqueapproach; the conservative approach, accordingto which CE (...)
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  17.  21
    The Openness of God: A Biblical Challenge to the Traditional Understanding of God.Clark Pinnock, Richard Rice, John Sanders, William Hasker & David Basinger - 1994 - Downers Grove: Intervarsity Press.
    Written by five scholars whose expertise extends across the disciplines of biblical, historical, systematic, and philosophical theology, this is a careful and ...
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  18. The Free Market Model Versus Government: A Reply to Nozick.John T. Sanders - 1977 - Journal of Libertarian Studies 1 (1):35-44.
    In Anarchy, State and Utopia, Robert Nozick argues, first, that free-market anarchism is unstable -that it will inevitably lead back to the state; and, second, that without a certain "redistributive" proviso, the model is unjust. If either of these things is the case, the model defeats itself, for its justification purports to be that it provides a morally acceptable alternative to government (and therefore to the state). I argue, against Nozick's contention, that his "dominant protection agency" neither meets his monopoly (...)
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  19. Experience, Memory and Intelligence.John T. Sanders - 1985 - The Monist 68 (4):507-521.
    What characterizes most technical or theoretical accounts of memory is their reliance upon an internal storage model. Psychologists and neurophysiologists have suggested neural traces (either dynamic or static) as the mechanism for this storage, and designers of artificial intelligence have relied upon the same general model, instantiated magnetically or electronically instead of neurally, to do the same job. Both psychology and artificial intelligence design have heretofore relied, without much question, upon the idea that memory is to be understood as a (...)
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  20.  16
    Transfer and a Supremum Principle for ERNA.Chris Impens & Sam Sanders - 2008 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 73 (2):689 - 710.
    Elementary Recursive Nonstandard Analysis, in short ERNA, is a constructive system of nonstandard analysis proposed around 1995 by Patrick Suppes and Richard Sommer, who also proved its consistency inside PRA. It is based on an earlier system developed by Rolando Chuaqui and Patrick Suppes, of which Michal Rössler and Emil Jeřábek have recently proposed a weakened version. We add a Π₁-transfer principle to ERNA and prove the consistency of the extended theory inside PRA. In this extension of ERNA a σ₁-supremum (...)
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  21.  48
    Taking a Stand on the Meanings of Stand: Bodily Experience as Motivation for Polysemy.Raymond W. Gibbs, Dinara A. Beitel, Michael Harrington & Paul E. Sanders - 1994 - Journal of Semantics 11 (4):231-251.
    This paper reports four experiments designed to examine the role that recurring bodily experiences have in motivating people's understandings of different senses of the polysemous word stand. Different patterns of recurring bodily experiences, called image schemas, emerge throughout sensorimotor activity and from our perceptual understanding of actions and events in the real world. The present claim is that each use of stand is motivated by a complex pattern of different image schemas. Experiment 1 revealed five major image schemas that are (...)
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  22. On ‘Cuteness’.John T. Sanders - 1992 - British Journal of Aesthetics 32 (2):162-165.
    For John Morreall, cuteness is an abstract general attribute of infants that causes adults to want to care for them (or which is the reason, or at least important reason, for such solicitousness). I shall try to show, in what follows, that this is, if not an altogether fallacious way of explaining the matter, at least an extremely misleading one. As it stands, in particular, it is too easy to infer from Morreall's line of reasoning 1) that infants in general (...)
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  23. Stanislaw Leśniewski's Logical Systems.John T. Sanders - 1996 - Axiomathes 7 (3):407-415.
    Stanislaw Lesniewski’s interests were, for the most part, more philosophical than mathematical. Prior to taking his doctorate at Jan Kazimierz University in Lvov, Lesniewski had spent time at several continental universities, apparently becoming relatively attached to the philosophy of one of his teachers, Hans Comelius, to the chapters of John Stuart Mill’s System of Logic that dealt specifically with semantics, and, in general, to studies of general grammar and philosophy of language. In these several early interests are already to be (...)
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  24.  21
    The Movement of Eye and Hand as a Window Into Language and Cognition.Michael Spivey, Daniel Richardson & Rick Dale - 2009 - In Ezequiel Morsella, John A. Bargh & Peter M. Gollwitzer (eds.), Oxford Handbook of Human Action. Oxford University Press. pp. 225--249.
  25. Incommensurability and Demarcation.John T. Sanders - 1998 - In Dane R. Gordon & Józef Niznik (eds.), Criticism and Defense of Rationality in Contemporary Philosophy. Rodopi. pp. 65--83.
    If the term "relativism" is understood as relativists take it, everyone is a relativist. If, on the other hand, one understands "relativism" as absolutists do, no one really could consistently be a relativist, despite what they might think. As I hope to show, however, much of this positioning of persons and philosophies is foolish. It misses much that is important in philosophical discussion and focuses attention in directions that lead to dead ends.
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  26.  40
    An Introduction to the Horizon Model: An Alternative to Universalist Frameworks of Mystical Development.Edward James Dale - 2009 - Sophia 48 (3):281-298.
    Critics have pointed out that the content and sequence of mystical development reported by different traditions do not seem very congruous with the contention that there is a universal path of mystical development. I propose a model of mystical development that is more subtle than traditional ‘invariant hierarchical’ models, and which explains how the apparently differing accounts of mystical development between traditions and thinkers can be reconciled with each other in a more convincing fashion, and brought together under one umbrella. (...)
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  27. Retinae Don't See.John T. Sanders - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):890-891.
    Sensation should be understood globally: some infant behaviors do not make sense on the model of separate senses; neonates of all species lack time to learn about the world by triangulating among different senses. Considerations of natural selection favor a global understanding; and the global interpretation is not as opposed to traditional work on sensation as might seem.
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  28. Ethics & Journalism.Karen Sanders - 2003 - Sage Publications.
    What are ethics? Why does ethical journalism matter? How do ethics affect good journalism? Ethics and Journalism provides a comprehensive overview of the main approaches to ethical enquiry in Western journalism. It examines the ethical dilemmas faced by journalists in all areas of the media and sets our ways of achieving ethical journalism. Ethics and Journalism: - Explores such subjects as: private lives and the public interest, relations to sources and coverage of death, disease and destruction - Examines the role (...)
     
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  29. Probability Logic and F.A. I. Dale - 1976 - Philosophy of Science 43 (2):254 - 265.
    In order that a degree-of-belief function be coherent it is necessary and sufficient that it satisfy the axioms of probability theory. This theorem relies heavily for its proof on the two-valued sentential calculus, which emerges as a limiting case of a continuous scale of truth-values. In this "continuum of certainty" a theorem analogous to that instanced above is proved.
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  30. Is Egoism Morally Defensible?Steven M. Sanders - 1988 - Philosophia 18 (2-3):191-209.
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  31.  6
    Ethics and Research: Searching for Ethical Practice in Research.Robyn Munford, Jackie Sanders, Brigit Mirfin Veitch & Jenny Conder - 2008 - Ethics and Social Welfare 2 (1):50-66.
  32. Time From the Inside Out.John T. Sanders - manuscript
    My main objective, in this paper, is to present at least a rough sketch of a new model for understanding time. Since many people are quite content with the model that they have, it will be worth while to show why a new model might be desirable, or even necessary. As it happens, looking at the problems involved in the more usual conception of time leads one naturally to look in certain directions for solutions, and such an introduction can therefore (...)
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  33.  49
    No Blind Schizophrenics: Are NMDA-Receptor Dynamics Involved?Glenn S. Sanders, Steven M. Platek & Gordon G. Gallup - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):103-104.
    Numerous searches have failed to identify a single co-occurrence of total blindness and schizophrenia. Evidence that blindness causes loss of certain NMDA-receptor functions is balanced by reports of compensatory gains. Connections between visual and anterior cingulate NMDA-receptor systems may help to explain how blindness could protect against schizophrenia.
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  34. Michael Polanyi's Post-Critical Epistemology: A Reconstruction of Some Aspects of "Tacit Knowing".Andy F. Sanders - 1990 - Rodopi.
  35.  24
    Democratic Politics and Survey Research.Lynn M. Sanders - 1999 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 29 (2):248-280.
    Democratically inspired critics identify a number of problems with the contemporaryidentification of survey research and public opinion. Surveys are said tonormalize or rationalize opinion, to promote state or corporate rather thandemocratic interests, to constrain authentic forms of participation, and to forcean individualized conception of public opinion. Some of these criticisms arerelatively easily answered by survey researchers. But the criticisms contain acomplaint that survey researchers have largely failed to address: that surveyresearch discourages the public, visible, and face-to-face generation of opinion.Public opinion (...)
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  36. A Mixed Bag: Political Change in Central and Eastern Europe and its Impact on Philosophical Thought.John T. Sanders - 1998 - In Dane R. Gordon (ed.), Philosophy in Post-Communist Europe. Rodopi.
    The most important voices concerning the changes now occurring in Central and Eastem Europe are those that come from within, for those voices are informed not only by indifferent data and objective reports, but by personal hopes, fears, desires and needs. Without careful consideration of what such voices say, judgment can only be sterile. Furthermore, policy decisions made without the benefit of the intemal perspective are likely to be flawed, and ineffectual. Policies won’t work if they do not take into (...)
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  37. Hare on Supervenience: Remarks on R.M. Hare's Supervenience.A. J. Dale - 1985 - Mind 94 (October):599-600.
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  38.  37
    On a Problem in Conditional Probability.A. I. Dale - 1974 - Philosophy of Science 41 (2):204-206.
  39.  11
    Dynamics of Control.Jeff Sanders & Matteo Turilli - 2007 - First Joint IEEE/IFIP Symposium on Theoretical Aspects of Software Engineering (TASE '07):440-449.
    This paper proposes a notion, the ?ambit? of an action, that allows the degree of distribution of an action in a multiagent system to be quantified without regard to its functionality. It demonstrates the use of that notion in the design, analysis and implementation of dynamically-reconfigurable multi-agent systems. It distinguishes between the extensional (or system) view and intensional (or agent-based) view of such a system and shows how, using the notion of ambit, the step-wise derivation paradigm of Formal Methods can (...)
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  40.  22
    Commentary on “Changing Explanatory Frameworks in the U.S. Government’s Attempts to Define Research Misconduct”. [REVIEW]Margaret Dale - 1999 - Science and Engineering Ethics 5 (2):158-160.
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  41.  68
    Anthropology, Hamlet and History.E. R. Sanders - 1977 - Diogenes 25 (97):21-42.
  42.  81
    Risk and Value.John T. Sanders - 1996 - A.S.V.I. News 1996 (Spring):4-5.
    Which risks are bad? This is not an easy question to answer in any non-circular way. Not only are risks sought out for various reasons, but risks are plainly discounted in many situations. What may seem "risky" when examined all by itself, may not seem risky when encountered in a real lived situation. Thus risks that are imposed by others, in particular, might seem horrendous when considered in abstraction, but quite acceptable when encountered in life. What we need to do, (...)
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  43.  29
    ``Why Simple Foreknowledge Offers No More Providential Control Than the Openness of God&Quot.John Sanders - 1997 - Faith and Philosophy 14 (1):26-40.
    This paper examines the question of whether the theory of simply foreknowledge (SF) provides God with greater providential control than does the theory of present knowledge (PK). It is claimed by the proponents of SF that a deity lacking such knowledge would not be able to provide the sort of providential aid commonly thought by theists to be given by God. To see whether this is the case I first distinguish two different versions of how God’s foreknowledge is accessed according (...)
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  44.  70
    Concrete Images for Abstract Questions: A Philosophical View.John T. Sanders - manuscript
    While I strongly agree with Patrick Grim that abstract relationships are real, and that it is possible to get them right, the danger that we will get them wrong is just as real. The use of visual representation of abstract phenomena, precisely because of our predilection to see patterns in everything and because we don't have to think so hard about visible representations generally, may lead us to see things that aren't there.
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  45.  15
    CHIRON: Planning in an Open-Textured Domain. [REVIEW]Kathryn E. Sanders - 2001 - Artificial Intelligence and Law 9 (4):225-269.
    Planning problems arise in law when an individual (or corporation)wants to perform a sequence of actions that raises legal issues. Manylawyers make their living planning transactions, and a system thathelped them to solve these problems would be in demand.The designer of such a system in a common-law domain must addressseveral difficult issues, including the open-textured nature of legal rules,the relationship between legal rules and cases, the adversarial nature ofthe domain, and the role of argument. In addition, the system's design isconstrained (...)
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  46.  55
    Does Place Matter? Sustainable Community Development in Three Canadian Communities.Lenore Newman, Chris Ling & Ann Dale - 2008 - Ethics, Place and Environment 11 (3):267-281.
    The creation of a sense of place has emerged as a goal of many community development initiatives. However, little thought has been given to the role of physical spaces in the shaping of possible senses of place. This article examines three Canadian examples of community sustainable development initiatives to demonstrate that sense of place can be shaped and constrained by the geographical and environmental features of the physical space a community occupies. This finding suggests that a 'one-size-fits-all' approach to community (...)
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  47.  64
    A Queer Supplement: Reading Spinoza After Grosz.Catherine Mary Dale - 1999 - Hypatia 14 (1):1-12.
    : This article critiques Elizabeth Grosz's understanding that queer theory is unproductive insofar as it disrupts the specific identities of gay and lesbian. Reconsidering ideas about desire, the body, and identity that Grosz takes from Gilles Deleuze's work on Friedrich Nietzsche and Baruch Spinoza, this essay argues that, despite her productive reworking of homophobia in terms of "active" and "reactive" forces, Grosz's application of Spinoza is only partial. Focusing on Spinoza's evaluation of bodies, the essay both critiques Grosz's approach to (...)
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  48.  60
    Anti-Realism and Logic.A. J. Dale - 1989 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 40 (2):213-217.
  49.  28
    The Ethics of Withholding and Withdrawing Critical Care.Lee M. Sanders & Thomas A. Raffin - 1993 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 2 (2):175.
    For the 17 centuries since Hippocrates called for “the most desperate remedies in desperate cases,” physicians have adhered steadfastly to two cooperative goals: to prolong life and to relieve suffering. ut during the past 50 years, mechanical interventions at the edge of life have thrown those aims into dramatic conflict. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation, mechanical ventilation, feeding tubes, and the intensive care unit have postponed physiologic death for many patients who are anencephalic, comatose, or in a persistent vegetative state or prefer death (...)
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  50.  53
    The Disjunctive Syllogism and Subjunctive Conditionals.A. J. Dale - 1984 - Philosophical Quarterly 34 (135):152-156.
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