Results for 'Dalsukh Bhai Dharmakirti'

178 found
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  1.  62
    Buddhist Idealism, Epistemic and Otherwise: Thoughts on the Alternating Perspectives of Dharmakīrti.Dan Arnold - 2008 - Sophia 47 (1):3-28.
    Some influential interpreters of Dharmakīrti have suggested understanding his thought in terms of a ‘sliding scale of analysis.’ Here it is argued that this emphasis on Dharmakīrti's alternating philosophical perspectives, though helpful in important respects, obscures the close connection between the two views in play. Indeed, with respect to these perspectives as Dharmakīrti develops them, the epistemology is the same either way. Insofar as that is right, John Dunne's characterization of Dharmakīrti's Yogācāra as ‘epistemic idealism ’ may not, after all, (...)
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  2.  16
    Shifting Concepts: The Realignment of Dharmakīrti on Concepts and the Error of Subject/Object Duality in Pratyabhijñā Śaiva Thought.Catherine Prueitt - 2017 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 45 (1):21-47.
    Contemporary scholars have begun to document the extensive influence of the sixth to seventh century Buddhist philosopher Dharmakīrti on Pratyabhijñā Śaiva thought. Utpaladeva and Abhinavagupta’s adaptation of Dharmakīrti’s apoha theory provides a striking instance of the creative ways in which these Śaivas use Dharmakīrti’s ideas to argue for positions that Dharmakīrti would emphatically reject. Both Dharmakīrti and these Śaivas emphasize that the formation of a concept involves both objective and subjective factors. Working within a certain perceptual environment, factors such as (...)
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  3. Realizing the Unreal: Dharmakīrti’s Theory of Yogic Perception. [REVIEW]John D. Dunne - 2006 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 34 (6):497-519.
    The Buddhist epistemologist Dharmakīrti (fl. ca. 7th century C.E.) developed a theory of yogic perception that achieved much influence among Buddhist thinkers in India and Tibet. His theory includes an odd problem: on Dharmakīrti’s view, many of the paradigmatic objects of the adept’s meditations do not really exist. How can one cultivate a meditative perception of the nonexistent? This ontological difficulty stems from Dharmakīrti’s decision to construe the Four Noble Truths as the paradigmatic objects of yogic perception. For him, this (...)
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  4. How to Avoid Solipsism While Remaining an Idealist: Lessons From Berkeley and Dharmakirti.Jeremy E. Henkel - 2013 - Comparative Philosophy 3 (1):58-73.
    This essay examines the strategies that Berkeley and Dharmakīrti utilize to deny that idealism entails solipsism. Beginning from similar arguments for the non-existence of matter, the two philosophers employ markedly different strategies for establishing the existence of other minds. This difference stems from their responses to the problem of intersubjective agreement. While Berkeley’s reliance on his Cartesian inheritance does allow him to account for intersubjective agreement without descending into solipsism, it nevertheless prevents him from establishing the existence of other finite (...)
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  5. Dharmakirti, Davidson, and Knowing Reality.Lajos Brons - 2013 - Comparative Philosophy 3 (1):30-57.
    If we distinguish phenomenal effects from their noumenal causes, the former being our conceptual(ized) experiences, the latter their grounds or causes in reality ‘as it is’ independent of our experience, then two contradictory positions with regards to the relationship between these two can be distinguished: either phenomena are identical with their noumenal causes, or they are not. Davidson is among the most influential modern defenders of the former position, metaphysical non-dualism. Dharmakīrti’s strict distinction between ultimate and conventional reality, on the (...)
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  6.  11
    On the Relative Chronology of Dharmakīrti and Samantabhadra.Piotr Balcerowicz - 2016 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 44 (3):437-483.
    In the discussions concerning the date of Dharmakīrti, Jaina sources have never been seriously taken into account. They may, however, provide a valuable insight because Dharmakīrti both criticised and was criticised by Jaina thinkers. Two Jaina authors, Samantabhadra and Pūjyapāda Devanandin, may prove crucial in determining the actual dates of Dharmakīrti. The paper argues that Dharmakīrti directly influenced Samantabhadra in a number of ways, which sets the terminus ante quem for Dharmakīrti, and his traditional chronology has to be reconsidered in (...)
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  7.  67
    Bhaṭṭa Rāmakaṇṭha’s Elaboration of Self-Awareness , and How It Differs From Dharmakīrti’s Exposition of the Concept.Alex Watson - 2010 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 38 (3):297-321.
    The article considers what happened to the Buddhist concept of self-awareness ( svasaṃvedana ) when it was appropriated by Śaiva Siddhānta. The first section observes how it was turned against Buddhism by being used to attack the momentariness of consciousenss and to establish its permanence. The second section examines how self-awareness differs from I-cognition ( ahampratyaya ). The third section examines the difference between the kind of self-awareness elaborated by Rāmakaṇṭha (‘reflexive awareness’) and a kind elaborated by Dharmakīrti (‘intentional self-awareness’). (...)
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  8.  47
    Dharmakīrti on the Role of Causation in Inference as Presented in Pramāṇavārttika Svopajñavṛtti 11–38.Brendan S. Gillon & Richard P. Hayes - 2008 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 36 (3):335-404.
    In the svārthānumāna chapter of his Pramāṇavārttika, the Buddhist philosopher Dharmakīrti presented a defense of his claim that legitimate inference must rest on a metaphysical basis if it is to be immune from the risks ordinarily involved in inducing general principles from a finite number of observations. Even if one repeatedly observes that x occurs with y and never observes y in the absence of x, there is no guarantee, on the basis of observation alone, that one will never observe (...)
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  9.  60
    Dharmakīrti’s Criticism of Anityatva in the Sāṅkhya Theory.Toshikazu Watanabe - 2011 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 39 (4-5):553-569.
    In his Pramāṇaviniścaya 3, Dharmakīrti criticizes the view of the Sāṅkhyas that the word anityatva (“impermanence”) means a process of transformation ( pariṇāma ) of primordial matter ( pradhāna ). In this connection, he deals with the following two explanations of transformation: (1) the disappearance ( tirodhāna ) of the previous dharma of an entity ( dharmin/dravya ) and (2) the cessation ( nivṛtti ) of the previous state ( avasthā ) of an entity ( avasthātṛ ). In response to (...)
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  10.  61
    Breaking the Circle. Dharmakīrti’s Response to the Charge of Circularity Against the Apoha Theory and its Tibetan Adaptation.Pascale Hugon - 2009 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 37 (6):533-557.
    This paper examines the Buddhist’s answer to one of the most famous (and more intuitive) objections against the semantic theory of “exclusion” ( apoha ), namely, the charge of circularity. If the understanding of X is not reached positively, but X is understood via the exclusion of non-X, the Buddhist nominalist is facing a problem of circularity, for the understanding of X would depend on that of non-X, which, in turn, depends on that of X. I distinguish in this paper (...)
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  11.  32
    Is Dharmakīrti Grabbing the Rabbit by the Horns? A Reassessment of the Scope of Prameya in Dharmakīrtian Epistemology.Pascale Hugon - 2011 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 39 (4-5):367-389.
    This paper attempts to make sense of Dharmakīrti’s conflicting statements regarding the object of valid cognition ( prameya ) in various parts of his works, considering in particular the claims that (i) there are two kinds of prameyas (particulars and universals), (ii) the particular alone is prameya , and (iii) what is non-existent also qualifies as prameya . It inquires into the relationship between validity ( prāmāṇya ), reliability ( avisaṃvāda ) and causal efficacy ( arthakriyā ) and suggests that (...)
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  12.  14
    Śālikanātha’s Criticism of Dharmakīrti’s Svasaṃvedana Theory.Taiken Kyuma - 2010 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 38 (3):247-259.
    The aim of this paper is to clarify how Śālikanātha’s epistemology can be distinguished from that of Dharmakīrti, especially in terms of their respective views on cognitive form (ākāra). It has been pointed out that Śālikanātha’s tripuṭī theory and svayaṃprakāśa theory are very close to Dharmakīrti’s epistemology. However, it remains questionable if Śālikanātha, who belongs to the Prābhākara branch of the Mīmāṃsā and is therefore a nirākāravādin, can subscribe to notions that Dharmakīrti developed on the basis of sākāravāda. The present (...)
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  13. Recognizing Reality Dharmakirti's Philosophy and its Tibetan Interpretations.Georges B. J. Dreyfus - 1997
  14.  13
    Dharmakirti's Theory of Inference Revaluation and Reconstruction.B. S. Gillon - 2002
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  15.  84
    Dignāga and Dharmakīrti on Perception and Self-Awareness.Christian Coseru - 2016 - In John Powers (ed.), The Buddhist World. London and New York: Routledge. pp. 526–537.
    Like many of their counterparts in the West, Buddhist philosophers realized a long time ago that our linguistic and conceptual practices are rooted in pre-predicative modes of apprehension that provide implicit access to whatever is immediately present to awareness. This paper examines Dignāga’s and Dharmakīrti’s contributions to what has come to be known as “Buddhist epistemology” (sometimes referred in the specialist literature by the Sanskrit neologism pramāṇavāda, lit. “doctrine of epistemic warrants”), focusing on the phenomenological and epistemic role of perception (...)
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  16.  54
    Are Reasons Causally Relevant for Action? Dharmakīrti and the Embodied Cognition Paradigm.Christian Coseru - 2017 - In Steven Michael Emmanuel (ed.), Buddhist Philosophy: A Comparative Approach. Hoboken, USA: Wiley Blackwell. pp. 109–122.
    How do mental states come to be about something other than their own operations, and thus to serve as ground for effective action? This papers argues that causation in the mental domain should be understood to function on principles of intelligibility (that is, on principles which make it perfectly intelligible for intentions to have a causal role in initiating behavior) rather than on principles of mechanism (that is, on principles which explain how causation works in the physical domain). The paper (...)
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  17.  70
    Self-Awareness (Svasaṃvedana) and Infinite Regresses: A Comparison of Arguments by Dignāga and Dharmakīrti.Birgit Kellner - 2011 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 39 (4-5):411-426.
    This paper compares and contrasts two infinite regress arguments against higher-order theories of consciousness that were put forward by the Buddhist epistemologists Dignāga (ca. 480–540 CE) and Dharmakīrti (ca. 600–660). The two arguments differ considerably from each other, and they also differ from the infinite regress argument that scholars usually attribute to Dignāga or his followers. The analysis shows that the two philosophers, in these arguments, work with different assumptions for why an object-cognition must be cognised: for Dignāga it must (...)
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  18.  10
    On Dharmakīrti’s Notion of Contingency/Dependence, with a Special Focus on Vināśa.Masamichi Sakai - 2018 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 46 (3):419-436.
    The concept of contingency is very much debated. In this paper, I’ll offer a novel interpretation of it in Dharmakīrti’s ontology, focusing on his treatment and understanding of vināśa which is, according to Dharmakīrti, not contingent and thus occurs necessarily to everything. I will do so by clarifying some important terms, motivating and explaining Dharmakīrti’s position, and analyzing firsthand some Dharmakīrtian debate excerpts with Nyāya and/or Vaiśeṣika philosophers as the main opponents. In the course of this, I will show that (...)
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  19.  57
    Atheology and Buddhalogy In Dharmakīrti’s Pramānavārttika.Roger R. Jackson - 1999 - Faith and Philosophy 16 (4):472-505.
    This article seeks to clarify the relation between arguments for atheism and descriptions of the summum bonum in Indian Buddhism, through the analysis of one influential text. I begin by noting that a number of writers have detected a tension between, on the one hand, Buddhist refutations of the existence of “God” and, on the other, Buddhist claims about the nature of the ultimate, which often appears to have God-like qualities. I then turn to a locus classicus of Mahāyāna Buddhist (...)
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  20. Dharmakīrti and Husserl on Negative Judgments.Zhihua Yao - 2007 - In Chan-Fai Cheung & Chung-Chi Yu (eds.), Phenomenology 2005, Vol. I, Selected Essays from Asia,. Zeta Books. pp. 731-746.
    Among various opinions in the controversy over the the cognition of non-existent objects (asad-ālambana-vijñāna) among various Buddhist and Indian philosophical schools or in the debate on the objectless presentations (gegenstandslose Vorstellungen) happened in the early development of phenomenology and analytic philosophy, I find that Dharmakīrti and Husserl hold similar views. Both of them have less interest in redefining the ontological status of nonexistent objects than Russell and Meinong. Rather they engage themselves in analyzing the experiential structure of negative cognition and (...)
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  21. Dharmakirti and Priest on Change.Chris Mortensen - 2004 - Philosophy East and West 54 (1):20-28.
    : Competing accounts of change and motion are given by the seventh-century Buddhist logician Dharmakirti and the contemporary analytical philosopher Graham Priest. They agree on much, but disagree on the issue of the Law of Non-Contradiction. This paper takes Dharmakirti's side, appealing to current space-time theory, while making some qualifications.
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  22.  15
    Dharmakīrti and His Commentators on the Process of Perceptual Activities.Jeson Woo - 2019 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 47 (1):31-48.
    In the tradition of Dharmakīrti, perception is, by definition, free from conceptual construction. Insofar as perception is thus, it lacks the nature of determining its object. Without identifying its object, how does perception lead one to a successful action? Perception in isolation would not be pramāṇa unless it is supplemented by perceptual judgement. This paper looks at how Dharamkīrti and his commentators offer solutions to the contradiction between perception’s foundational role and its seeming dependence on conceptual construction. The key point (...)
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  23.  21
    Karmic Imprints, Exclusion, and the Creation of the Worlds of Conventional Experience in Dharmakīrti’s Thought.Catherine Prueitt - 2018 - Sophia 57 (2):313-335.
    Dharmakīrti’s apoha theory of concept formation aims to provide an account of intersubjectivity without relying on the existence of real universals. He uses the pan-Yogācāra theory of karmic imprints to claim that sentient beings form concepts by treating unique particulars as if a certain subset of them had the same effects. Since this judgment of sameness depends on an individual's habits, desires, and sensory capacities, and these in turn depend on the karmic imprints developed over countless lifetimes and continuously reshaped (...)
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  24.  97
    Dharmakīrti's Dualism: Critical Reflections on a Buddhist Proof of Rebirth.Dan Arnold - 2008 - Philosophy Compass 3 (5):1079-1096.
    Dharmakīrti, elaborating one of the Buddhist tradition's most complete defenses of rebirth, advanced some of this tradition's most explicitly formulated arguments for mind-body dualism. At the same time, Dharmakīrti himself may turn out to be vulnerable to some of the same kinds of arguments pressed against physicalists. It is revealing, then, that in arguing against physicalism himself, Dharmakīrti does not have available to him what some would judge to be more promising arguments for dualism (arguments, in particular, following Kant's 2nd (...)
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  25.  60
    A "Restricted" Interpretation of Dharmakīrti's Philosophy. [REVIEW]Christian Coseru - 2006 - H-Net Reviews in the Humanities and Social Sciences.
    The continuing surge in work on Dharmakīrti represents one of the most fertile enterprises within the field of Buddhist Studies. The only South Asian philosopher to have been the subject of four international conferences, Dharmakīrti commands a veritable legacy of scholarship, whether directly, through the translation and study of his own works, or indirectly, through the study of his followers, commentators, and one-time opponents.[1] In the context of this burgeoning enterprise, characterized by a high degree of specialization, any attempt to (...)
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  26.  20
    Dignāga, Kumārila and Dharmakīrti on the Potential Problem of Pramāṇa and Phala Having Different Objects.Kei Kataoka - 2016 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 44 (2):229-239.
    Following Dharmakīrti’s interpretation, PS I 9ab has been understood as stating a view common to both Sautrāntikas and Yogācāras, i.e. a view that self-awareness is the result of a means of valid cognition. It has also been understood that Dignāga accepts two different views attributed to Sautrāntikas with regard to pramāṇaphala: in PS ad I 8cd he regards the cognition of an external object as the result; in PS ad I 9ab–cd he alternatively presents another view that self-awareness is the (...)
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  27.  31
    Sātmaka, Nairātmya, and A-Nairātmya: Dharmakīrti’s Counter-Argument Against the Proof of Ātman. [REVIEW]Kyo Kano - 2011 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 39 (4-5):391-410.
    Ātman (soul) and Nairātmya (no soul) are, for the Brahmanical schools and the Buddhists respectively, equally fundamental tenets which neither side can concede to the other. Among the 16 formulations presented by Uddyotakara, the fifteenth, which is a proof of Ātman and is originally an indirect proof ( avīta/āvīta ), is presented in a prasaṅga -style, and contains double negation ( na nairātmyam ) in the thesis. However, it is perhaps Dharmakīrti who first transformed it into a normal style ( (...)
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  28.  22
    Determining Which Jaina Philosopher Was the Object of Dharmakīrti's Criticisms.Fujinaga Sin - 2000 - Philosophy East and West 50 (3):378-384.
    Dharmakīrti's critique of Jaina philosophy is examined under three categories: epistemology, ontology, and ethics. It is shown that the target of this critique was Samantabhadra, who, like Dharmakīrti, was also a native of southern India.
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  29. Dharmakīrti's Pramāṇavārttika: An Annotated Translation of the Fourth Chapter (Parārthānumāna). Dharmakīrti - 2000 - Österreichische Akademie Der Wissenschaften.
     
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  30.  15
    Dharmakīrti on the Cessation of Suffering: A Critical Edition with Translation and Comments of Manorathanandinʼs Vṛtti and Vibhūticandraʼs Glosses on Pramāṇavārttika Ii.190-216.Cristina Pecchia (ed.) - 2015 - Leiden: Brill.
    Liberation is a fundamental subject in South Asian doctrinal and philosophical reflection. This book is a study of the discussion of liberation from suffering presented by Dharmakīrti, one of the most influential Indian philosophers. It includes an edition and translation of the section on the cessation of suffering according to Manorathanandin, the last commentator on Dharmakīrti’s Pramāṇavārttika in the Sanskrit cosmopolis. The edition is based on the manuscript used by Sāṅkṛtyāyana and other sources. Methodological issues related to editing ancient Sanskrit (...)
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  31. Buddhist Theory of Perception with Special Reference to Pramāṇa Vārttika of Dharmakīrti.C. S. Vyas - 1991 - Navrang.
    Summary An attempt is made in this book to expound the Buddhist theory of perception as conceived by Dinnaga and Dharmkirti, especially as presented in Pramanavarttika of the latter. The study is divided into nine chapters. The first chapter deals with the Dinaga-Dharmakirti logico-epistemological sub-system within the overall system of Buddhist philosophy. The second chapter brings out the unique contribution of Pramanavarttika as a commentary to Pramanasamuccaya of Dinnaga. The third and fourth chapters are focused on the pre-Dinnaga and (...)
     
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  32. Scripture, Logic, Language Essays on Dharmakirti and His Tibetan Successors.Tom J. F. Tillemans - 1999
  33.  52
    Can the Fool Lead the Blind? Perception and the Given in Dharmakīrti's Thought.George Dreyfus - 1996 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 24 (3):209-229.
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  34. Dharmakirti's Theory of Inference: Revaluation and Reconstruction.Brendan S. Gillon - 2005 - Mind 114 (455):768-772.
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  35. In Defense of Dharmakīrti -- A Response to Tanaka.Chris Mortensen - 2007 - Philosophy East and West 57 (2):253-256.
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  36.  28
    Dharmakīrti.Vincent Eltschinger - 2010 - Revue Internationale de Philosophie 253 (3):397-440.
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  37.  39
    Dharmakīrti's Theory of Truth.Shoryu Katsura - 1984 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 12 (3):215-235.
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  38. Dharmakīrti and Priest on an Inconsistent Theory of Change — a Comment to Mortensen.Koji Tanaka - 2007 - Philosophy East and West 57 (2):244-252.
  39.  25
    Dharmakīrti Against Physicalism.John Taber - 2003 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 31 (4):479-502.
  40.  14
    Dharmakīrti.Tom Tillemans - forthcoming - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  41. In Defense of Dharmakīrti: A Response to Tanaka.Chris Mortensen - 2007 - Philosophy East and West 57 (2):253-256.
  42.  21
    DharmakĪrti and Tibetans onAd $$\Underset{\Raise0.3em\Hbox{$\Smash{\Scriptscriptstyle\Cdot}$}}{R} $$ Śyānupalabdhihetu.Tom J. F. Tillemans - 1995 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 23 (2):129-149.
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  43.  25
    Dharmakīrti and His Commentators on Yogipratyaksa.Jeson Woo - 2003 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 31 (4):439-448.
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  44.  19
    Whose Experience Validates What for Dharmakīrti.R. Hayes - 1997 - In Bimal Krishna Matilal, Jitendranath Mohanty & Purusottama Bilimoria (eds.), Relativism, Suffering, and Beyond: Essays in Memory of Bimal K. Matilal. Oxford University Press.
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  45.  31
    Introduction to Dharmakīrti's Theory of Inference as Presented in Pramā $$\Underset{\Raise0.3em\Hbox{$\Smash{\Scriptscriptstyle\Cdot}$}}{N}$$ Avārttika Svopajñav $$\Underset{\Raise0.3em\Hbox{$\Smash{\Scriptscriptstyle\Cdot}$}}{T}$$ Tti 1–10. [REVIEW]Richard P. Hayes & Brendan S. Gillon - 1991 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 19 (1):1-73.
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  46. Defining and Redefining Svalaksana: Dharmakirti's Concept and its Tibetan Modification.Chizuko Yoshimizu - 2004 - In Musashi Tachikawa, Shoun Hino & Toshihiro Wada (eds.), Three Mountains and Seven Rivers: Prof. Motilal Banarsidass Publishers. pp. 117--133.
     
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  47.  85
    Dharmakirti on the Distinction Between Svarthanumana and Pararthanumana.Mangala R. Chinchore - 1988 - Indian Philosophical Quarterly 15 (2):177-188.
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  48.  12
    Much Ado About Nothing: Kumārila, Śāntarakṣita, and Dharmakīrti on the Cognition of Non-BeingNichts Bleibt Nichts: Die Buddhistische Zurückweisung von Kumārila's Abhāvapramāṇa; Übersetzung Und Interpretation von Śāntarakṣita's Tattvasaṅgraha Vv. 1647-1690 MIT Kamalaśīla's Tattvasaṅgrahapañjikā Sowie Ansätze Und Arbeitshypothese Zur Geschichte Negativer Erkenntnis in der Indischen PhilosophieMuch Ado About Nothing: Kumarila, Santaraksita, and Dharmakirti on the Cognition of Non-BeingNichts Bleibt Nichts: Die Buddhistische Zuruckweisung von Kumarila's Abhavapramana; Ubersetzung Und Interpretation von Santaraksita's Tattvasangraha Vv. 1647-1690 MIT Kamalasila's Tattvasangrahapanjika Sowie Ansatze Und Arbeitshypothese Zur Geschichte Negativer Erkenntnis in der Indischen Philosophie. [REVIEW]John Taber & Birgit Kellner - 2001 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 121 (1):72.
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  49. Once Again on Dharmakīrti's Deviation From Dignāga on Pratyak $\Underset{\Raise0.3em\Hbox{$\Underset{\Raise0.3em\Hbox{\Smash{\Scriptscriptstyle\Cdot}$}}{s}$}}{s} " />Âbhāsa. [REVIEW]Eli Franco - 1986 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 14 (1).
     
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  50.  10
    Much Ado About Nothing: Kumārila, Śāntarakṣita, and Dharmakīrti on the Cognition of Non-Being. [REVIEW]John Taber - 2001 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 121 (1):72-88.
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