Results for 'Damasio's confusion'

76 found
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  1.  45
    Formalisation of Damasio’s Theory of Emotion, Feeling and Core Consciousness.Tibor Bosse, Catholijn M. Jonker & Jan Treur - 2008 - Consciousness and Cognition 17 (1):94-113.
    This paper contributes an analysis and formalisation of Damasio’s theory on core consciousness. Three important concepts in this theory are ‘emotion’, ‘feeling’ and ‘feeling a feeling’ . In particular, a simulation model is described of the dynamics of basic mechanisms leading via emotion and feeling to core consciousness, and dynamic properties are formally specified that hold for these dynamics at a more global level. These properties have been automatically checked for the simulation model. Moreover, a formal analysis is made of (...)
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  2. Damasio's Error and Descartes' Truth: An Inquiry Into Consciousness, Metaphysics, and Epistemology.Andrew L. Gluck - 2007 - University of Scranton Press.
    The question of the relationship between mind and body as posed by Descartes, Spinoza, and others remains a fundamental debate for philosophers. In _Damasio’s Error and Descartes’ Truth_, Andrew Gluck constructs a pluralistic response to the work of neurologist Antonio Damasio. Gluck critiques the neutral monistic assertions found in _Descartes’ Error _and _Looking for Spinoza_ from a philosophical perspective, advocating an adaptive theory—physical monism in the natural sciences, dualism in the social sciences, and neutral monism in aesthetics. Gluck’s work is (...)
     
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  3.  44
    C. S. Peirce, Antonio Damasio, and Embodied Cognition: A Contemporary Post-Darwinian Account of Feeling and Emotion in the ‘Cognition Series’.Lara M. Trout - 2008 - Contemporary Pragmatism 5 (1):79-108.
    A post-Darwinian conception of feeling and emotion is necessary in order to better appreciate the embodied, personalized, and socialized nature of cognition in Peirce's late 1860's Journal of Speculative Philosophy "cognition series." Peirce both distinguishes between and renders synonymous the terms "feeling" and "emotion," a fruitful ambiguity that underscores how easily one's process of thinking can be influenced by idiosyncratic concerns. My reading of this series is a proactive one in which I employ the work of Antonio Damasio to highlight (...)
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  4. Damasio's Error?Jaak Panksepp - 2003 - Consciousness and Emotion 4 (1):111-134.
     
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  5.  8
    Stronger Autonomic Response Accompanies Better Learning: A Test of Damasio's Somatic Marker Hypothesis.Sid Carter & Marcia Smith Pasqualini - 2004 - Cognition and Emotion 18 (7):901-911.
  6.  1
    Damasio’s Body-Map-Based View, Panksepp’s Affect-Centric View, and the Evolutionary Advantages of Consciousness.Jane Anderson - 2019 - South African Journal of Philosophy 38 (4):419-432.
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  7.  78
    Damasio’s Error.Aaron Sloman - 2004 - The Philosophers' Magazine 28 (28):61-64.
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  8.  25
    A Nested-Sign Diagram Analysis of Antonio Damasio's Looking for Spinoza.J. Raymond Zimmer - 2003 - Semiotics:157-167.
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  9. Cartesian Error and Damasio's Jargon.Gian Luigi Brena - 2011 - Verifiche: Rivista Trimestrale di Scienze Umane 40 (1-3):5-23.
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  10.  82
    Proper Embodiment: The Role of the Body in Affect and Cognition.Mog Stapleton - 2012 - Dissertation, University of Edinburgh
    Embodied cognitive science has argued that cognition is embodied principally in virtue of grossmorphological and sensorimotor features. This thesis argues that cognition is also internally embodied in affective and fine-grained physiological features whose transformative roles remain mostlyunnoticed in contemporary cognitive science. I call this ‘proper embodiment’. I approach this larger subject by examining various emotion theories in philosophy and psychology. These tend to emphasiseone of the many gross components of emotional processes, such as ‘feeling’ or ‘judgement’ to thedetriment of the (...)
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  11. Intenzionalità e azione nel mondo delle emozioni: Damasio e i suoi critici: rilevanza filosofica di un dialogo scientifico.Selene Mezzalira - 2011 - Verifiche: Rivista Trimestrale di Scienze Umane 40 (1):153-199.
    The aim of this paper is to introduce the debate on some relevant philosophical problems raised by Damasio‟s works. I will start with some critiques against Damasio‟s approach, such as his falling back into cartesianism or into some form of mentalism, his failing to consider the results of psychiatry and neurodynamics, the «mereological fallacy» of his representationalism. I will discuss other issues such as the interpretation of emotional processes, the problem of separation between feelings and emotions, the marginal role of (...)
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  12. Easy's Gettin' Harder All the Time: The Computational Theory and Affective States.Jason Megill & Jon Cogburn - 2005 - Ratio 18 (3):306-316.
    We argue that A. Damasio’s (1994) Somatic Marker hypothesis can explain why humans don’t generally suffer from the frame problem, arguably the greatest obstacle facing the Computational Theory of Mind. This involves showing how humans with damaged emotional centers are best understood as actually suffering from the frame problem. We are then able to show that, paradoxically, these results provide evidence for the Computational Theory of Mind, and in addition call into question the very distinction between easy and hard problems (...)
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  13.  3
    Emotions, intentionality, and practical rationality the contrast between the theories of emotions of William James and Antonio Damasio.Sebastián Pereira Restrepo - 2019 - Ideas Y Valores 68 (170):13-36.
    RESUMEN Se presentan y discuten las teorías de las emociones de W. James y de A. Damasio, enfatizando en la intencionalidad de las emociones y en su vínculo con la racionalidad práctica. Se argumenta que la propuesta de James enfrenta varias dificultades para dar cuenta de ambos aspectos de las emociones, y se muestra cómo la teoría neo-jamesiana de Damasio supera en parte algunas de esas dificultades, pero también da pie a otras objeciones. Se resume la propuesta de Jesse Prinz (...)
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  14.  5
    “[G]Azing Into the Synaptic Chasm”: The Brain in Beckett’s Writing.Rina Kim - 2016 - Journal of Medical Humanities 37 (2):149-160.
    This paper argues that Samuel Beckett’s interest in functions of the brain is not only evidenced in his notebooks, taken from a number of psychology and psycho-physiognomy texts in the early 1930s, but is also explored and expanded in his fiction and drama. This paper investigates Beckett’s fascination with the limits of “cerebral consciousness” and the brain’s failure to consciously perceive certain bodily modifications especially when processing emotion. Like Antonio Damasio’s definition of emotion as essentially the bodily modifications that include (...)
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  15. Review of M. R. Bennett & P. M. S. Hacker, Philosophical Foundations of Neuroscience. [REVIEW]Joel Smith - 2005 - Mind 114 (454):391-394.
    In this long and detailed book Bennett and Hacker set themselves two ambitious tasks. The first is to offer a philosophical critique of, what they argue are, philosophical confusions within contemporary cognitive neuroscience. The second is to present a ‘conceptual reference work for cognitive neuroscientists who wish to check the contour lines of the psychological concept relevant to their investigation’ (p.7). In the process they cover an astonishing amount of material. The first two chapters present a critical history of neuroscience (...)
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  16.  19
    Spinoza’s Missing Physiology.Raphaële Andrault - 2019 - Perspectives on Science 27 (2):214-243.
    In his Handbook of Physiology, the nineteenth-century physician Johannes Müller cited the third part of the Ethics entirely: no one, he held, had ever explained "static connections among passions" better than Spinoza. Earlier, Goethe referred to the famous physiologist Boerhaave as a "master of clinical medicine and the last disciple of Spinoza". And more than a century later, in his book Looking for Spinoza, the neuroscientist Antonio Damasio considered that Spinoza's Ethics offered the proper philosophical framework for understanding the neurology (...)
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  17. Spinoza’s Anticipation of Contemporary Affective Neuroscience.H. M. Ravven - 2003 - Consciousness and Emotion 4 (2):257-290.
    Spinoza speculated on how ethics could emerge from biology and psychology rather than disrupt them and recent evidence suggests he might have gotten it right. His radical deconstruction and reconstruction of ethics is supported by a number of avenues of research in the cognitive and neurosciences. This paper gathers together and presents a composite picture of recent research that supports Spinoza’s theory of the emotions and of the natural origins of ethics. It enumerates twelve naturalist claims of Spinoza that now (...)
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  18. Review of Damasio, Descartes' Error. [REVIEW]Daniel C. Dennett - manuscript
    The legacy of René Descartes' notorious dualism of mind and body extends far beyond academia into everyday thinking: "These athletes are prepared both mentally and physically," and "There's nothing wrong with your body--it's all in your mind." Even among those of us who have battled Descartes' vision, there has been a powerful tendency to treat the mind (that is to say, the brain) as the body's boss, the pilot of the ship. Falling in with this standard way of thinking, we (...)
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  19. Mallon, R., B1 Marslen-Wilson, WD, 271 Navarra, J., B13 Nichols, S., B1.D. Boatman, S. Boudelaa, C. A. Camp, A. Damasio, H. Damasio, N. F. Dronkers, S. A. Gelman, T. Grabowski, G. Hickok & P. Indefrey - 2004 - Cognition 92:353.
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  20. Reconciling Cognitive and Perceptual Theories of Emotion: A Representational Proposal.Louis C. Charland - 1997 - Philosophy of Science 64 (4):555-579.
    The distinction between cognitive and perceptual theories of emotion is entrenched in the literature on emotion and is openly used by individual emotion theorists when classifying their own theories and those of others. In this paper, I argue that the distinction between cognitive and perceptual theories of emotion is more pernicious than it is helpful, while at the same time insisting that there are nonetheless important perceptual and cognitive factors in emotion that need to be distinguished. A general representational metatheoretical (...)
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  21. The Feeling of Doing – Nietzsche on Agent Causation.Manuel Dries - 2013 - Nietzscheforschung 20 (1):235-247.
    This article examines Nietzsche’s analysis of the phenomenology of agent causation. Sense of agent causation, our sense of self-efficacy, is tenacious because it originates, according to Nietzsche’s hypothesis, in the embodied and situated experience of effort in overcoming resistances. It arises at the level of the organism and is sustained by higher-order cognitive functions. Based on this hypothesis, Nietzsche regards the sense of self as emerging from a homeostatic system of drives and affects that unify such as to maintain self-efficacy (...)
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  22. Two Myths About Somatic Markers.Stefan Linquist & Jordan Bartol - 2013 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 64 (3):455-484.
    Research on patients with damage to ventromedial frontal cortices suggests a key role for emotions in practical decision making. This field of investigation is often associated with Antonio Damasio’s Somatic Marker Hypothesis—a putative account of the mechanism through which autonomic tags guide decision making in typical individuals. Here we discuss two questionable assumptions—or ‘myths’—surrounding the direction and interpretation of this research. First, it is often assumed that there is a single somatic marker hypothesis. As others have noted, however, Damasio’s ‘hypothesis’ (...)
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  23. Cartesianism, the Embodied Mind, and the Future of Cognitive Research.Philippe Gagnon - 2015 - In Dirk Evers, Michael Fuller, Anne Runehov & Knut-Willy Sæther (eds.), Do Emotions Shape the World? Biennial Yearbook of the European Society for the Study of Science and Theology 2015-2016. Martin-Luther-Universität. pp. 225-244.
    In his oft-cited book Descartes' Error, Antonio Damasio claims that Descartes is responsible for having stifled the development of modern neurobiological science, in particular as regards the objective study of the physical and physiological bases for emotive and socially-conditioned cognition. Most of Damasio’s book would stand without reference to Descartes, so it is intriguing to ask why he launched this attack. What seems to fuel such claims is a desire for a more holistic understanding of the mind, the brain and (...)
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  24.  17
    Understanding the Mind's Will.Antonio R. Damasio - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (4):589-589.
  25.  19
    Damage to Broca’s Area OR the Anterior Temporal Lobe is Implicated in Stroke-Induced Agrammatic Comprehension: It Depends on the Task.Rogalsky Corianne, LaCroix Arianna, Chen Kuan-Hua, Anderson Steven, Damasio Hanna, Love Tracy & Hickok Greg - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  26.  11
    Dancing with Damasio: Complementary Aspects of Kinesthesia, Complementary Approaches to Dance.Susan Pashman - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 51 (4):26-43.
    Accounting for expression presents a central problem for aesthetic theories; It is the problem of how a nonsentient physical object—a painting, a concerto, a dance—can “carry” or convey human emotion. How, for example, does a perceived shape or “form” become a “felt” form? In dance, to speak of “form” is to refer to both the changing shape of the dancer’s body and the dynamic shape the dancer’s movements describe in space. Dance is distinguished from some other visual arts in that (...)
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  27.  11
    Editor’s Choices.Daniel N. Robinson - 2001 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 21 (1):80-86.
    Reviews the books, Emotion and peace of mind: From stoic agitation to Christian temptation by Richard Sorabji and Other minds by Anita Avramides . The two works considered here are deeply serious and composed by scholars who have executed their projects with undeviating integrity. In Emotion and Peace of Mind, based on his Gifford Lectures, Richard Sorabji moves the reader through a veritable course of study on a subject as notoriously protean as it is central to the lived life. The (...)
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  28. D Daehler, MW, 130,131,149,152, 153,155,156,157,172,183 Damasio, A., 88 Dattel, AR, 149,150,152,153,154.P. L. Cannon, H. W. Carmichael, C. S. Casey, R. Catrambone, R. I. Charles, V. M. Chase, P. W. Cheng, M. T. H. Chi, M. Chiu & K. N. Clayton - 1997 - In Lyn D. English (ed.), Mathematical Reasoning: Analogies, Metaphors, and Images. L. Erlbaum Associates.
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  29. The Conceptual Framework for the Investigation of Emotions.P. M. S. Hacker - 2009 - In Ylva Gustafsson, Camilla Kronqvist & Michael McEachrane (eds.), Emotions and Understanding: Wittgensteinian Perspectives. Palgrave-Macmillan.
    The experimental study of the emotions as pursued by LeDoux and Damasio is argued to be flawed as a consequence of the inadequate conceptual framework inherited from the work of William James. This paper clarifes the conceptual structures necessary for any discussion of the emotions. Emotions are distinguished from appetites and other non-emotional feelings, as well as from agitations and moods. Emotional perturbations are distinguished from emotional attitudes and motives. The causes of an emotion are differentiated from the objects of (...)
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  30. The Conceptual Framework for the Investigation of the Emotions.Peter M. S. Hacker - 2004 - International Review of Psychiatry 16 (3):199-208.
    The experimental study of the emotions as pursued by LeDoux and Damasio is argued to be flawed as a consequence of the inadequate conceptual framework inherited from the work of William James. This paper clarifes the conceptual structures necessary for any discussion of the emotions. Emotions are distinguished from appetites and other non-emotional feelings, as well as from agitations and moods. Emotional perturbations are distinguished from emotional attitudes and motives. The causes of an emotion are differentiated from the objects of (...)
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  31.  26
    Basic Emotions and Their Biological Substrates: A Nominalistic Interpretation.Peter Zachar & S. Bartlett - 2002 - Consciousness and Emotion 2 (2):189-221.
    The thesis of this article is that an attitude akin to pragmatism is internal to the scientific enterprise itself, and as a result many scientists will make the same types of non-essentialistic interpretations of their subject matter that are made by pragmatists. This is demonstrably true with respect to those scientists who study the biological basis of emotion such as Panksepp, LeDoux, and Damasio. Even though these scientists are also influenced by what cognitive psychologists call the essentialist bias, their research (...)
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  32. Self-Deception as Affective Coping. An Empirical Perspective on Philosophical Issues.Federico Lauria, Delphine Preissmann & Fabrice Clément - 2016 - Consciousness and Cognition 41:119-134.
    In the philosophical literature, self-deception is mainly approached through the analysis of paradoxes. Yet, it is agreed that self-deception is motivated by protection from distress. In this paper, we argue, with the help of findings from cognitive neuroscience and psychology, that self-deception is a type of affective coping. First, we criticize the main solutions to the paradoxes of self-deception. We then present a new approach to self-deception. Self-deception, we argue, involves three appraisals of the distressing evidence: (a) appraisal of the (...)
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  33. Why Emotions Do Not Solve the Frame Problem.Madeleine Ransom - 2016 - In Vincent Müller (ed.), Fundamental Issues of Artificial Intelligence. Springer. pp. 353-365.
    Attempts to engineer a generally intelligent artificial agent have yet to meet with success, largely due to the (intercontext) frame problem. Given that humans are able to solve this problem on a daily basis, one strategy for making progress in AI is to look for disanalogies between humans and computers that might account for the difference. It has become popular to appeal to the emotions as the means by which the frame problem is solved in human agents. The purpose of (...)
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  34. Somatic Markers and Response Reversal: Is There Orbitofrontal Cortex Dysfunction in Boys With Psychopathic Tendencies?R. J. R. Blair, E. Colledge & D. G. V. Mitchell - 2001 - Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology 29 (6):499-511.
    This study investigated the performance of boys with psychopathic tendencies and comparison boys, aged 9 to 17 years, on two tasks believed to be sensitive to amygdala and orbitofrontal cortex func- tioning. Fifty-one boys were divided into two groups according to the Psychopathy Screening Device (PSD, P. J. Frick & R. D. Hare, in press) and presented with two tasks. The tasks were the gambling task (A. Bechara, A. R. Damasio, H. Damasio, & S. W. Anderson, 1994) and the Intradimensional/ (...)
     
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  35.  92
    The Somatic Marker Hypotheses, and What the Iowa Gambling Task Does and Does Not Show.Giovanna Colombetti - 2008 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 59 (1):51-71.
    Damasio's somatic marker hypothesis (SMH) is a prominent neuroscientific hypothesis about the mechanisms implementing decision-making. This paper argues that, since its inception, the SMH has not been clearly formulated. It is possible to identify at least two different hypotheses, which make different predictions: SMH-G, which claims that somatic states generally implement preferences and are needed to make a decision; and SMH-S, which specifically claims that somatic states assist decision-making by anticipating the long-term outcomes of available options. This paper also (...)
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  36. What Role Do the Emotions Play in Cognition? Towards a New Alternative to Cognitive Theories of Emotion.Jason L. Megill - 2003 - Consciousness and Emotion 4 (1):81-100.
    This paper has two aims: (1) to point the way towards a novel alternative to cognitive theories of emotion, and (2) to delineate a number of different functions that the emotions play in cognition, functions that become visible from outside the framework of cognitive theories. First, I hold that the Higher Order Representational (HOR) theories of consciousness — as generally formulated — are inadequate insofar as they fail to account for selective attention. After posing this dilemma, I resolve it in (...)
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  37.  68
    Conscious Machines: Memory, Melody and Muscular Imagination. [REVIEW]Susan A. J. Stuart - 2010 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 9 (1):37-51.
    A great deal of effort has been, and continues to be, devoted to developing consciousness artificially (A small selection of the many authors writing in this area includes: Cotterill (J Conscious Stud 2:290–311, 1995 , 1998 ), Haikonen ( 2003 ), Aleksander and Dunmall (J Conscious Stud 10:7–18, 2003 ), Sloman ( 2004 , 2005 ), Aleksander ( 2005 ), Holland and Knight ( 2006 ), and Chella and Manzotti ( 2007 )), and yet a similar amount of effort has (...)
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  38.  26
    Introduction: Educational Neuroscience.Kathryn E. Patten & Stephen R. Campbell - 2011 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (1):1-6.
    This chapter presents emotion as a function of brain‐body interaction, as a vital part of a multi‐tiered phylogenetic set of neural mechanisms, evoked by both instinctive processes and learned appraisal systems, and argues to establish the primacy of emotion in relation to cognition. Primarily based on Damasio's somatic marker hypothesis, but also incorporating elements of Lazarus' appraisal theory, this paper presents a neuropedagogical model of emotion, the somatic appraisal model of affect. SAMA identifies quintessential components, facets, and functions of (...)
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  39.  59
    “Of What Use Are the Odes? ” Cognitive Science, Virtue Ethics, and Early Confucian Ethics.Edward Slingerland - 2011 - Philosophy East and West 61 (1):80-109.
    In his well-known 1994 work Descartes’ Error, the neuroscientist Antonio Damasio describes his work with patients suffering from damage to the prefrontal cortex, a center of emotion processing in the brain. The accidents or strokes that had caused this damage had spared these patients’ “higher” cognitive faculties: their short- and long-term memories, abstract reasoning skills, mathematical aptitude, and performance on standard IQ tests were completely unimpaired. They were also perfectly healthy physically, with no apparent motor or sensory disabilities. Nonetheless, these (...)
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  40.  2
    Zero Degree Affects.Moysés Pinto Neto & Charles Borges - 2019 - Revista de Filosofia Aurora 31 (54).
    This essay seeks a new approach between philosophy and neuroscience inspired by the recent ontological turn to think about one of the affects modulations across the contemporary sociopolitical scenario. In this regard, it theoretically triangulates the appropriation of Spinoza's philosophy by neuroscientist Antonio Damasio and the reception of Damasio's neuroscience by philosopher Catherine Malabou, taking Gilles Deleuze as a connecting point between these perspectives. It proposes to think the concept of destructive plasticity as a metamorphosis in the organism that, (...)
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  41.  35
    VII. Emotions, Rationality, and Mind/Body1: Patricia Greenspan.Patricia Greenspan - 2003 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 52:113-125.
    There are now quite a number of popular or semi-popular works urging rejection of the old opposition between rationality and emotion. They present evidence or theoretical arguments that favour a reconception of emotions as providing an indispensable basis for practical rationality. Perhaps the most influential is neuroanatomist Antonio Damasio's Descartes' Error, which argues from cases of brain lesion and other neurological causes of emotional deficit that some sort of emotional ‘marking,’ of memories of the outcomes of our choices with (...)
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  42.  20
    The Somatic Appraisal Model of Affect: Paradigm for Educational Neuroscience and Neuropedagogy.Kathryn E. Patten - 2011 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (1):87-97.
    This chapter presents emotion as a function of brain-body interaction, as a vital part of a multi-tiered phylogenetic set of neural mechanisms, evoked by both instinctive processes and learned appraisal systems, and argues to establish the primacy of emotion in relation to cognition. Primarily based on Damasio's somatic marker hypothesis, but also incorporating elements of Lazarus' appraisal theory, this paper presents a neuropedagogical model of emotion, the somatic appraisal model of affect (SAMA). SAMA identifies quintessential components, facets, and functions (...)
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  43.  11
    Emotions on a Continuum.David D. Franks - 2010 - Emotion Review 2 (2):105-106.
    An alternative approach to emotion is presented here, which differs from that of Kagan and others. It orders emotion along a continuum of the embodiment of emotion, starting with a clear but rare case of pure emotion and at the other extreme discusses Damasio’s intelligent prefrontal patients who could not feel emotions critical to social life.
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  44. Formal Analysis of Dynamics Within Philosophy of Mind by Computer Simulation.Tibor Bosse, Martijn C. Schut & Jan Treur - 2009 - Minds and Machines 19 (4):543-555.
    Computer simulations can be useful tools to support philosophers in validating their theories, especially when these theories concern phenomena showing nontrivial dynamics. Such theories are usually informal, whilst for computer simulation a formally described model is needed. In this paper, a methodology is proposed to gradually formalise philosophical theories in terms of logically formalised dynamic properties. One outcome of this process is an executable logic-based temporal specification, which within a dedicated software environment can be used as a simulation model to (...)
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  45.  42
    How Do We Embody Intentionality?Anton Lethin - 2002 - In Martin Hahn & B. Ramberg (eds.), Journal of Consciousness Studies. MIT Press. pp. 36-44.
    The enactive view states that mental processes are embodied in the sensorimotor activity of the organism. This paper seeks to show how it is possible to be conscious of intentions in an embodied way, by adding detail about muscle spindle action to a theory put forward by Damasio. Consciousness is here understood as the awareness of our intentionality. This is a motor plan to interact with the environment, and is expressed in the body. As the body prepares the muscles to (...)
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  46.  10
    Emotion and Consciousness: Part II.Douglas F. Watt - 2000 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 7 (3):72-84.
    A Review of Antonio Damasio's ‘The Feeling Of What Happens: Body and Emotion in the Making of Consciousness’.
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  47.  8
    Utilitarian Decision or Random Decision? Critique of a Thesis Rooted in Cognitive Neuroscience.Alejandro Rosas & Caviedes - 2013 - Ideas Y Valores 62 (153):179-199.
    RESUMEN Diversos estudios han concluido que los pacientes con daño en la Corteza Frontal -CF- o Corteza Prefrontal Ventromedial -CPV- muestran una disposición a herir directamente a otra persona con el fin de salvar varias vidas en sus respuestas a los "dilemas morales personales", revelando una posible carencia de empatía. No obstante, cuando evalúan conductas carentes de empatía sin justificación utilitarista, sus respuestas son normales. Defendemos aquí que los pacientes sufren una deficiencia cognitiva relacionada con la hipótesis de marcador somático (...)
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  48.  7
    Internal Perception.Luigi Pastore & Sara Dellantonio - 2017 - Springer Berlin Heidelberg.
    Chapter 1 First Person Access to Mental States. Mind Science and Subjective Qualities -/- Abstract. The philosophy of mind as we know it today starts with Ryle. What defines and at the same time differentiates it from the previous tradition of study on mind is the persuasion that any rigorous approach to mental phenomena must conform to the criteria of scientificity applied by the natural sciences, i.e. its investigations and results must be intersubjectively and publicly controllable. In Ryle’s view, philosophy (...)
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  49.  57
    The New LeDoux: Survival Circuits, and the Surplus Meaning of ‘Fear’.Raamy Majeed - forthcoming - Philosophical Quarterly.
    LeDoux’s (1996) pioneering work on the neurobiology of fear has played a crucial role in informing debates in the philosophy of emotion. For example, it plays a key part in Griffiths’s (1997) argument for why emotions don’t form a natural kind. Likewise, it is employed by Faucher and Tappolet (2002) to defend pro-emotion views, which claim that emotions aid reasoning (de Sousa 1987, Damasio 1994). LeDoux, however, now argues that his work has been misread (2012, 2016, 2017, 2019). He argues (...)
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  50.  23
    The Literary Mind.Mark Turner - 1996 - Oxford University Press.
    We usually consider literary thinking to be peripheral and dispensable, an activity for specialists: poets, prophets, lunatics, and babysitters. Certainly we do not think it is the basis of the mind. We think of stories and parables from Aesop's Fables or The Thousand and One Nights, for example, as exotic tales set in strange lands, with spectacular images, talking animals, and fantastic plots--wonderful entertainments, often insightful, but well removed from logic and science, and entirely foreign to the world of everyday (...)
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