Results for 'Damien Wayne Riggs'

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  1.  66
    Reassessing the Foster-Care System: Examining the Impact of Heterosexism on Lesbian and Gay Applicants.Damien Wayne Riggs - 2007 - Hypatia 22 (1):132-148.
    : In this essay, Riggs demonstrates how heterosexism shapes foster-care assessment practices in Australia. Through an examination of lesbian and gay foster-care applicants' assessment reports and with a focus on the heteronormative assumptions contained within them, Riggs demonstrates that foster-care public policy and research on lesbian and gay parenting both promote the idea that lesbian and gay parents are always already "just like" heterosexual parents. To counter this idea of "sameness," Riggs proposes an approach to both assessing (...)
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  2.  11
    Reassessing the Foster-Care System: Examining the Impact of Heterosexism on Lesbian and Gay Applicants.Damien Wayne Riggs - 2007 - Hypatia 22 (1):132-148.
    In this essay, Riggs demonstrates how heterosexism shapes foster-care assessment practices in Australia. Through an examination of lesbian and gay foster-care applicants’ assessment reports and with a focus on the heteronormative assumptions contained within them, Riggs demonstrates that foster-care public policy and research on lesbian and gay parenting both promote the idea that lesbian and gay parents are always already “just like” heterosexual parents. To counter this idea of “sameness,” Riggs proposes an approach to both assessing and (...)
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  3.  13
    Book Review: The Sexual Demon of Colonial Power: Pan-African Embodiment and Erotic Schemes of Empire by Greg Thomas Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 2007 Reviewed by Damien W. Riggs[REVIEW]Damien W. Riggs - 2009 - Body and Society 15 (3):120-121.
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  4.  35
    Critical Reply to'Culpability for Epistemic Injustice: Deontic or Aretetic'by Wayne Riggs.D. A. Coady - 2012 - Social Epistemology: Review and Reply Collective 1 (5):3-6.
  5. Epistemic Value.Wayne D. Riggs - 2009 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
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  6. Understanding, Knowledge, and the Meno Requirement Wayne D. Riggs.Wayne Riggs - manuscript
    Jonathan Kvanvig's book, The Value of Knowledge and the Pursuit of Understanding (Kvanvig, 2003), is a wonderful example of doing epistemology in a style that Kvanvig himself has termed "value−driven epistemology." On this approach, one takes questions about epistemic value to be central to theoretical concerns, including the concern to provide an adequate account of knowledge. This approach yields the demand that theories of knowledge must provide, not just an adequate account of the nature of knowledge, but also an account (...)
     
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  7. Two Problems of Easy Credit.Wayne Riggs - 2009 - Synthese 169 (1):201-216.
    In this paper I defend the theory that knowledge is credit-worthy true belief against a family of objections, one of which was leveled against it in a recent paper by Jennifer Lackey. In that paper, Lackey argues that testimonial knowledge is problematic for the credit-worthiness theory because when person A comes to know that p by way of the testimony of person B, it would appear that any credit due to A for coming to believe truly that p belongs to (...)
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  8. Reliability and the Value of Knowledge.Wayne D. Riggs - 2002 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 64 (1):79-96.
    Reliabilism has come under recent attack for its alleged inability to account for the value we typically ascribe to knowledge. It is charged that a reliably-produced true belief has no more value than does the true belief alone. I reply to these charges on behalf of reliabilism; not because I think reliabilism is the correct theory of knowledge, but rather because being reliably-produced does add value of a sort to true beliefs. The added value stems from the fact that a (...)
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  9. Why Epistemologists Are so Down on Their Luck.Wayne Riggs - 2007 - Synthese 158 (3):329 - 344.
    It is nearly universally acknowledged among epistemologists that a belief, even if true, cannot count as knowledge if it is somehow largely a matter of luck that the person so arrived at the truth. A striking feature of this literature, however, is that while many epistemologists are busy arguing about which particular technical condition most effectively rules out the offensive presence of luck in true believing, almost no one is asking why it matters so much that knowledge be immune from (...)
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  10. ``Understanding, Knowledge, and the M Eno Requirement&Quot.Wayne D. Riggs - 2009 - In Adrian Haddock, Alan Millar & Duncan Pritchard (eds.), Epistemic Value. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
     
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  11. Open-Mindedness.Wayne Riggs - 2010 - Metaphilosophy 41 (1-2):172-188.
    Abstract: Open-mindedness is typically at the top of any list of the intellectual or "epistemic" virtues. Yet, providing an account that simultaneously explains why open-mindedness is an epistemically valuable trait to have and how such a trait is compatible with full-blooded belief turns out to be a challenge. Building on the work of William Hare and Jonathan Adler, I defend a view of open-mindedness that meets this challenge. On this view, open-mindedness is primarily an attitude toward oneself as a believer, (...)
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  12. The Value Turn in Epistemology.Wayne Riggs - 2008 - In Vincent Hendricks (ed.), New Waves in Epistemology. Palgrave-Macmillan. pp. 300--23.
    forthcoming 2007 in New Waves in Epistemology, Vincent Hendricks & Duncan Pritchard, eds.
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  13. Luck, Knowledge, and Control.Wayne Riggs - 2009 - In Pritchard, Haddock & MIllar (eds.), Epistemic Value. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 204--221.
     
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  14. Balancing Our Epistemic Goals.Wayne D. Riggs - 2003 - Noûs 37 (2):342–352.
  15.  15
    Reliability and the Value of Knowledge.Wayne D. Riggs - 2002 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 64 (1):79-96.
    Reliabilism has come under recent attack for its alleged inability to account for the value we typically ascribe to knowledge. It is charged that a reliably-produced true belief has no more value than does the true belief alone. I reply to these charges on behalf of reliabilism; not because I think reliabilism is the correct theory of knowledge, but rather because being reliably-produced does add value of a sort to true beliefs. The added value stems from the fact that a (...)
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  16. Understanding 'Virtue' and the Virtue of Understanding.Wayne D. Riggs - 2003 - In Michael DePaul & Linda Zagzebski (eds.), Intellectual Virtue: Perspectives From Ethics and Epistemology. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 203-226.
     
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  17.  86
    Epistemic Risk and Relativism.Wayne D. Riggs - 2008 - Acta Analytica 23 (1):1-8.
    It is generally assumed that there are (at least) two fundamental epistemic goals: believing truths, and avoiding the acceptance of falsehoods. As has been often noted, these goals are in conflict with one another. Moreover, the norms governing rational belief that we should derive from these two goals depend on how we weight them relative to one another. However, it is not obvious that there is one objectively correct weighting for everyone in all circumstances. Indeed, as I shall argue, it (...)
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  18. Culpability for Epistemic Injustice: Deontic or Aretetic?Wayne Riggs - 2012 - Social Epistemology 26 (2):149-162.
    This paper focuses on several issues that arise in Miranda Fricker?s book Epistemic injustice surrounding her claims about our (moral) culpability for perpetrating acts of testimonial injustice. While she makes frequent claims about moral culpability with respect to specific examples, she never addresses the issue in its full generality, and we are left to extrapolate her general view about moral culpability for acts of testimonial injustice from these more restricted and particular claims. Although Fricker never describes testimonial injustice in such (...)
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  19.  82
    Beyond Truth and Falsehood: The Real Value of Knowing That P.Wayne D. Riggs - 2002 - Philosophical Studies 107 (1):87--108.
    Current epistemological dogma has it that the twin goalsof believing truths and avoiding errors exhaust our cognitive aspirations.On such a view, (call it the TG view) the only evaluationsthat count as genuinely epistemological are those that evaluatesomething (a belief, believer, set of beliefs, a cognitivetrait or process, etc.) in terms of its connection to thesetwo goods. In particular, this view implies that all theepistemic value of knowledge must be derived from thevalue of the two goals cited in TG. I argue (...)
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  20.  73
    What Are the “Chances” of Being Justified?Wayne D. Riggs - 1998 - The Monist 81 (3):452-472.
    It will startle no one to hear that there is widespread disagreement among philosophers about the nature and criteria of epistemic justification. There are many distinct notions of epistemic justification, distinguished from one another in a bewildering variety of ways. There are internalist justification, externalist justification, coherentist justification, foundationalist justification, deontic justification, consequentialist justification, propositional justification, doxastic justification, personal justification, situational justification, objective justification, subjective justification, cognitive justification, and structural justification. None of these is quite equivalent to another, yet each (...)
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  21.  7
    Narratives of Choice Amongst White Australians Who Undertake Surrogacy Arrangements in India.Damien W. Riggs - 2016 - Journal of Medical Humanities 37 (3):313-325.
    This paper reports on a rhetorical analysis of interviews with fifteen white Australian citizens who had undertaken offshore commercial surrogacy in India. Extending previous research, the findings suggest that genetic relatedness was valorized, and surrogacy constructed as a less tenuous route to family formation. The paper concludes with a discussion of the need for further research on 1) how the contentious nature of offshore commercial surrogacy may prevent full consideration of its ethical implications, 2) the differing belief systems between India (...)
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  22.  56
    Luck, Knowledge, and “Mere” Coincidence.Wayne D. Riggs - 2014 - Metaphilosophy 45 (4-5):627-639.
    There are good reasons for pursuing a theory of knowledge by way of understanding the connection between knowledge and luck. Not surprisingly, then, there has been a burgeoning of interest in “luck theories” of knowledge as well as in theories of luck in general. Unfortunately, “luck” proves to be as recalcitrant an analysandum as “knows.” While it is well worth pursuing a general theory of luck despite these difficulties, our theory of knowledge might be made more manageable if we could (...)
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  23.  97
    Can a Coherence Theory Appeal to Appearance States?Jonathan L. Kvanvig & Wayne D. Riggs - 1992 - Philosophical Studies 67 (3):197-217.
    Coherence theorists have universally defined justification as a relation only among (the contents of) belief states, in contradistinction to other theories, such as some versions of founda­tionalism, which define justification as a relation on belief states and appearance states.
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  24.  28
    The Weakness of Strong Justification.Wayne D. Riggs - 1997 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 75 (2):179 – 189.
  25.  8
    Repressing a Privileged Location: Exploring the Uncanniness of White Belonging.Damien W. Riggs - 2003 - Analysis (Australian Centre for Psychoanalysis) 12:83.
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  26.  45
    Representations of Surrogacy in Submissions to a Parliamentary Inquiry in New South Wales.Damien W. Riggs & Clemence Due - 2012 - Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology 16 (1):71-84.
    Whilst feminist commentators have long critiqued surrogacy as a practice of commodification, surrogacy as a mode of family formation continues to grow in popularity. In this paper we explore public representations of surrogacy through a discourse analytic reading of submissions made in Australia to an Inquiry regarding surrogacy legislation. The findings suggest that many submissions relied upon normative understandings of surrogates as either ‘good women’ or ‘bad mothers’. This is of concern given that such public representations may shape the views (...)
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  27.  16
    Beyond Truth and Falsehood: The.Wayne D. Riggs - 2000 - Philosophical Studies:87-108.
    Current epistemological dogma has it that the twin goalsof believing truths and avoiding errors exhaust our cognitive aspirations. On such a view, (call it the "TG view") the only evaluations that count as genuinely epistemological are those that evaluate something (a belief, believer, set of beliefs, a cognitive trait or process, etc.) in terms of its connection to these two goods. In particular, this view implies that all the epistemic value of knowledge must be derived from the value of the (...)
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  28. Getting the Meno Requirement Right.Wayne Riggs - 2009 - In Pritchard, Haddock & MIllar (eds.), Epistemic Value. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 331--38.
     
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  29. Insight, Open−Mindedness and Understanding.Wayne Riggs - manuscript
    I am interested in epistemic virtues for reasons rather different than most. I do not offer a virtue theory of anything, I don't argue that we can solve various long−standing problems in epistemology by appeal to epistemic virtues, nor am I an opponent of any of these things (though I certainly find some of these projects more plausible than others.) Rather, my interest in the epistemic virtues stems from a long−standing commitment to epistemic value pluralism, and a belief that, until (...)
     
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  30. Reliability and the Value of Knowledge1 1. Introduction.Wayne Riggs - manuscript
    Is knowledge more valuable than mere true belief? Few question the value of having true beliefs, and insofar as having knowledge entails (at least) having a true belief, we value knowledge. But traditionally it has been assumed that whatever it takes to turn true belief into knowledge has some additional value. Traditionally, then, philosophers have been committed to what I will call the ‘Value Principle'.
     
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  31.  41
    Review of Jonathan Kvanvig, The Value of Knowledge and the Pursuit of Understanding[REVIEW]Wayne Riggs - 2004 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2004 (3).
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  32. The Lack of Control Account of Luck.Wayne D. Riggs - 2019 - In Ian M. Church & Robert J. Hartman (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of the Philosophy and Psychology of Luck. pp. 125-135.
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  33. ``Understanding `Virtue' and the Virtue of Understanding&Quot.Wayne D. Riggs - 2003 - In Michael DePaul & Linda Zagzebski (eds.), Intellectual Virtue: Persepectives From Ethics and Epistemology. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 203-227.
     
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  34.  34
    “We Grew Here You Flew Here”: Claims to “Home” in the Cronulla Riots.Clemence Due & Damien W. Riggs - 2008 - Colloquy 16:210-228.
    Fiona Allon writes that “ home, now more than ever, is seen as firmly connected to the world of politics and economics, as actively shaped and defined by the public sphere rather than existing simply as a refuge from it.” 1 From this perspective, claims to home as they are located in a relationship to claims of both national and local belonging are often a contested site within Australia, where notions of who is seen to be at home in Australia (...)
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  35.  44
    Riggs on Strong Justification.Joel Katzav - 1998 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 76 (4):631 – 639.
    In 'The Weakness of Strong Justification' Wayne Riggs claims that the requirement that justified beliefs be truth conducive (likely to be true) is not always compatible with the requirement that they be epistemically responsible (arrived at in an epistemically responsible manner)1. He supports this claim by criticising Alvin Goldman's view that if a belief is strongly justified, it is also epistemically responsible. In light of this, Riggs recommends that we develop two independent conceptions of justification, one that (...)
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  36. Knowledge Without Credit, Exhibit 4: Extended Cognition. [REVIEW]Krist Vaesen - 2011 - Synthese 181 (3):515-529.
    The Credit Theory of Knowledge (CTK)—as expressed by such figures as John Greco, Wayne Riggs, and Ernest Sosa—holds that knowing that p implies deserving epistemic credit for truly believing that p . Opponents have presented three sorts of counterexamples to CTK: S might know that p without deserving credit in cases of (1) innate knowledge (Lackey, Kvanvig); (2) testimonial knowledge (Lackey); or (3) perceptual knowledge (Pritchard). The arguments of Lackey, Kvanvig and Pritchard, however, are effective only in so (...)
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  37. Epistemic Value.Adrian Haddock, Alan Millar & Duncan Pritchard (eds.) - 2009 - Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    Recent epistemology has reflected a growing interest in issues about the value of knowledge and the values informing epistemic appraisal. Is knowledge more valuable that merely true belief or even justified true belief? Is truth the central value informing epistemic appraisal or do other values enter the picture? Epistemic Value is a collection of previously unpublished articles on such issues by leading philosophers in the field. It will stimulate discussion of the nature of knowledge and of directions that might be (...)
     
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  38.  86
    Epistemic Value.Adrian Haddock, Alan Millar & Duncan Pritchard (eds.) - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    Recent epistemology has reflected a growing interest in issues about the value of knowledge and the values informing epistemic appraisal. Is knowledge more valuable that merely true belief or even justified true belief? Is truth the central value informing epistemic appraisal or do other values enter the picture? Epistemic Value is a collection of previously unpublished articles on such issues by leading philosophers in the field. It will stimulate discussion of the nature of knowledge and of directions that might be (...)
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  39.  94
    Internalist Virtues and Knowledge.Sarah Wright - 2010 - Acta Analytica 25 (2):119-132.
    What role can intellectual virtues play in an account of knowledge when we interpret those virtues internalistically, i.e., as depending only on internal states of the cognizer? Though it has been argued that internalist virtues are ill suited to play any role in an account of knowledge, I will show that, on the contrary, internalist virtues can play an important role in recent accounts of knowledge developed to utilize externalist virtues. The virtue account of knowledge developed by Linda Zagzebski is (...)
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  40.  91
    Bayesianism and Diverse Evidence: A Reply to Andrew Wayne.Wayne C. Myrvold - 1996 - Philosophy of Science 63 (4):661-665.
    Andrew Wayne discusses some recent attempts to account, within a Bayesian framework, for the "common methodological adage" that "diverse evidence better confirms a hypothesis than does the same amount of similar evidence". One of the approaches considered by Wayne is that suggested by Howson and Urbach and dubbed the "correlation approach" by Wayne. This approach is, indeed, incomplete, in that it neglects the role of the hypothesis under consideration in determining what diversity in a body of evidence (...)
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  41.  18
    Destroying Mara Forever: Buddhist Ethics Essays in Honor of Damien Keown.Damien Keown, John Powers & Charles S. Prebish (eds.) - 2010 - Snow Lion Publications.
    Several contributions in the book show how these principles apply to contemporary problems and moral issues.
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  42.  19
    Interview: Wayne Silby.Wayne Silby - 1992 - Business Ethics 6 (6):28-30.
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  43.  21
    Interview: Wayne Silby.Wayne Silby - 1992 - Business Ethics: The Magazine of Corporate Responsibility 6 (6):28-30.
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  44.  31
    Wayne's World Growing Up in Cleveland, Ohio, 1941-1963.Wayne J. Urban - 1995 - Educational Studies 26 (4):301-320.
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  45. The Nature of Buddhist Ethics.Damien Keown - 1992 - St. Martin's Press.
  46.  67
    Buddhist Ethics: A Very Short Introduction.Damien Keown - 2005 - Oxford University Press.
    The latter half of the twentieth century witnessed a growing interest in Buddhism, and it continues to capture the imagination of many in the West who see it as either an alternative or a supplement to their own religious beliefs. Numerous introductory books have appeared in recent years to cater to this growing interest, but almost none devotes attention to the specifically ethical dimensions of the tradition. For various complex cultural and historical reasons, ethics has not received as much attention (...)
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  47. The Principal Paradox of Time Travel.Peter J. Riggs - 1997 - Ratio 10 (1):48–64.
    Most arguments against the possibility of time travel use the same old, familiar objection: If I could travel back in time, then I could kill my earlier (i.e. younger) self. Since I do exist such an action would result in a contradiction. Therefore time travel is impossible. This is a statement of the Principal Paradox of Time Travel. Some philosophers have argued that such actions as attempting to kill one’s earlier self would always fail and that there is nothing especially (...)
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  48.  73
    Toward the Development of an Elementary Teacher's Science Teaching Efficacy Belief Instrument.Iris M. Riggs & Larry G. Enochs - 1990 - Science Education 74 (6):625-637.
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  49. Whys and Ways of Science: Introducing Philosophical and Sociological Theories of Science.Peter J. Riggs - 1992 - Melbourne University Press.
    Whys and Ways of Science presents the issues, arguments and the theories that have attracted the greatest attention and which are covered in the greater majority of tertiary courses offered in philosophical and social studies of science. A primary aim of the book is to present a suitably broad picture of the spectrum of theories about science without sacrificing too much detail. About one-half of the book is devoted to the most influential philosophical theories of science and scientific change to (...)
     
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  50.  27
    Children's Reasoning and the Mind.P. Mitchell & Kevin J. Riggs (eds.) - 2000 - Psychology Press/Taylor & Francis.
    This book offers a thorough investigation into the development of the cognitive processes that underpin judgements about mental states (often termed 'theory of ...
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