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Dan Kaufman
University of Colorado, Boulder
Daniel A. Kaufman
Missouri State University
  1. Locke on Individuation and the Corpuscular Basis of Kinds.Dan Kaufman - 2007 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 75 (3):499–534.
    In a well-known paper, Reginald Jackson expresses a sentiment not uncommon among readers of Locke: “Among the merits of Locke’s Essay…not even the friendliest critic would number consistency.”2 This unflattering opinion of Locke is reiterated by Maurice Mandelbaum: “Under no circumstances can [Locke] be counted among the clearest and most consistent of philosophers.”3 The now familiar story is that there are innumerable inconsistencies and internal problems contained in Locke’s Essay. In fact, it is probably safe to say that there is (...)
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  2. Descartes's Creation Doctrine and Modality.Dan Kaufman - 2002 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 80 (1):24 – 41.
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  3.  36
    Cartesian Substances, Individual Bodies, and Corruptibility.Dan Kaufman - 2014 - Res Philosophica 91 (1):71-102.
    According to the Monist Interpretation of Descartes, there is really only one corporeal substance—the entire extended plenum. Evidence for this interpretation seems to be provided by Descartes in the Synopsis of the Meditations, where he claims that all substances are incorruptible. Finite bodies, being corruptible, would then fail to be substances. On the other hand, ‘body, taken in the general sense,’ being incorruptible, would be a corporeal substance. In this paper, I defend a Pluralist Interpretation of Descartes, according to which (...)
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  4. Divine Simplicity and the Eternal Truths in Descartes.Dan Kaufman - 2003 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (4):553 – 579.
  5. Descartes on the Objective Reality of Materially False Ideas.Dan Kaufman - 2000 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 81 (4):385–408.
    “The Standard Interpretation” of Descartes on material falsity states that Descartes believed that materially false ideas (MFIs) lack “objective reality” [realitas objectiva]. The argument for the Standard Interpretation depends on a statement from the “Third Meditation” that MFIs are caused by nothing. This statement, in conjunction with a causal principle introduced by Descartes, seems to entail that MFIs lack objective reality. However, the Standard Interpretation is incorrect. First, I argue that, despite initial appearances, the manner in which Descartes understands the (...)
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  6. The Resurrection of the Same Body and the Ontological Status of Organisms: What Locke Should Have (and Could Have) Told Stillingfleet.Dan Kaufman - 2008 - In Hoffman Owen (ed.), Contemporary Perspectives on Early Modern Philosophy. Broadview.
    Vere Chappell has pointed out that it is not clear whether Locke has a well-developed ontology or even whether he is entitled to have one.2 Nevertheless, it is clear that Locke believes that there are organisms, and it is clear that he thinks that there are substances. But does he believe that organisms are substances? There are certainly parts of the Essay in which Locke seems unequivocally to state that organisms are substances. For instance, in 2.23.3 Locke uses men and (...)
     
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  7. Descartes on Composites, Incomplete Substances, and Kinds of Unity.Dan Kaufman - 2008 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 90 (1):39-73.
    It is widely-accepted that Descartes is a substance dualist, i.e. that he holds that there are two and only two kinds of finite substance – mind and body. However, several scholars have argued that Descartes is a substance trialist, where the third kind of substance he admits is the substantial union of a mind and a body, the human being. In this paper, I argue against the trialist interpretation of Descartes. First, I show that the strongest evidence for trialism, based (...)
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  8. God's Immutability and the Necessity of Descartes's Eternal Truths.Dan Kaufman - 2005 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 43 (1):1-19.
  9. Infimus Gradus Libertatis? Descartes on Indifference and Divine Freedom.Dan Kaufman - 2003 - Religious Studies 39 (4):391-406.
    Descartes held the doctrine that the eternal truths are freely created by God. He seems to have thought that a proper understanding of God's freedom entails such a doctrine concerning the eternal truths. In this paper, I examine Descartes' account of divine freedom. I argue that Descartes' statements about indifference, namely that indifference is the lowest grade of freedom and that indifference is the essence of God's freedom are not incompatible. I also show how Descartes arrived at his doctrine of (...)
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  10.  47
    Normative Criticism and the Objective Value of Artworks.Daniel A. Kaufman - 2002 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 60 (2):151–166.
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  11. Locks, Schlocks, and Poisoned Peas: Boyle on Actual and Dispositive Qualities.Dan Kaufman - 2006 - In Daniel Garber & Steven Nadler (eds.), Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy Volume 3. Clarendon Press.
     
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  12.  43
    Family Resemblances, Relationalism, and the Meaning of 'Art'.Daniel A. Kaufman - 2007 - British Journal of Aesthetics 47 (3):280-297.
    Peter Kivy has maintained that the Wittgensteinian account of ‘art’ ‘is not a going concern’ and that ‘the traditional task of defining the work of art is back in fashion, with a vengeance’. This is true, in large part, because of the turn towards relational definitions of ‘art’ taken by philosophers in the 1960s; a move that is widely believed to have countered the Wittgensteinian charge that ‘art’ is an open concept and which gave rise to a ‘New Wave’ in (...)
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  13.  70
    Composite Objects and the Abstract/Concrete Distinction.Daniel A. Kaufman - 2002 - Journal of Philosophical Research 27:215-238.
    In his latest book, Realistic Rationalism (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1998), Jerrold J. Katz proposes an ontology designed to handle putative counterexamples to the traditional abstract/concrete distinction. Objects like the equator and impure sets, which appear to have both abstract and concrete components, are problematic for classical Platonism, whose exclusive categories of objects with spatiotemporal location and objects lacking spatial or temporal location leave no room for them. Katz proposes to add a “composite” category to Plato’s dualistic ontology, which is (...)
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  14. Locke on Individuation and the Corpuscular Basis of Kinds1.Dan Kaufman - 2007 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 75 (3):499-534.
    In this paper, I examine the crucial relationship between Locke’s theory of individuation and his theory of kinds. Locke holds that two material objects—e.g., a mass of matter and an oak tree—can be in the same place at the same time, provided that they are ‘of different kinds’. According to Locke, kinds are nominal essences, that is, general abstract ideas based on objective similarities between particular individuals. I argue that Locke’s view on coinciding material objects is incompatible with his view (...)
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  15.  62
    Art and Freedom.Daniel A. Kaufman - 2004 - British Journal of Aesthetics 44 (3):307-309.
  16.  38
    Dan O'Brien, Introduction to the Theory of Knowledge. [REVIEW]Daniel A. Kaufman - 2009 - Teaching Philosophy 32 (4):413-417.
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  17.  47
    Knowledge, Wisdom, and the Philosopher.Daniel A. Kaufman - 2006 - Philosophy 81 (1):129-151.
    The overarching thesis of this essay is that despite the etymological relationship between the word ‘philosophy’ and wisdom—the word ‘philosophos’, in Greek, means ‘lover of wisdom’—and irrespective of the longstanding tradition of identifying philosophers with ‘wise men’—mainline philosophy, historically, has had little interest in wisdom and has been preoccupied primarily with knowledge. Philosophy, if we are speaking of the mainline tradition, has had and continues to have more in common with the natural and social sciences than it does with the (...)
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  18.  31
    Critical Justification and Critical Laws.Daniel A. Kaufman - 2003 - British Journal of Aesthetics 43 (4):393-400.
    This essay counters the claim, made by Arnold Isenberg, Mary Mothersill, and others, that there can be no straightforward justification of critical evaluations of artworks, because there can be no critical laws. My argument is that if we adopt an Aristotelian view of the value of artworks, the problem of critical laws is reduced to a mere problem of scope and is easily solved. An Aristotelian system of kind classification, which groups artworks according to common formal and narrative purposes, provides (...)
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  19.  18
    Rationalism, Naturalism, and Conservatism.Daniel Kaufman - 2000 - Southwest Philosophy Review 17 (1):123-136.
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  20.  12
    Reality in Common Sense: Reflections on Realism and Anti–Realism From a 'Common Sense Naturalist'Perspective.Daniel A. Kaufman - 2002 - Philosophical Investigations 25 (4):331-361.
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  21.  17
    Interpretation and the “Investigative” Concept of Criticism.Daniel A. Kaufman - 2012 - Angelaki 17 (1):3 - 12.
    Angelaki, Volume 17, Issue 1, Page 3-12, March 2012.
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  22.  22
    Between Reason and Common Sense. On the Very Idea of Necessary (Though Unwarranted) Belief.Daniel A. Kaufman - 2005 - Philosophical Investigations 28 (2):134–158.
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  23.  17
    Review of David Clemenson, Descartes' Theory of Ideas[REVIEW]Dan Kaufman - 2008 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (3).
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  24.  17
    A Word From the Editors.Daniel A. Kaufman - 1999 - Philosophical Forum 30 (1):1–1.
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  25.  14
    Review of Stephen Gaukroger (Ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Descartes' Meditations[REVIEW]Dan Kaufman - 2006 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (6).
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  26.  1
    Descartes on the Objective Reality of Materially False Ideas.Dan Kaufman - 2000 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 81 (4):385-408.
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  27. The Routledge Companion to Seventeenth Century Philosophy.Dan Kaufman (ed.) - 2015 - Routledge.
    The Seventeenth century is one of the most important periods in the history of Western philosophy, witnessing philosophical, scientific, religious and social change on a massive scale. In spite of this, there are remarkably few comprehensive, single volume surveys of the period as a whole. The Routledge Companion to Seventeenth Century Philosophy is an outstanding and comprehensive survey of this momentous period, covering the major thinkers, topics and movements in Seventeenth century philosophy. It is divided into seven parts: Historical Context (...)
     
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