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  1. `If Adorno Isn't the Devil, It's Because He's a Jew': Lyotard's Misreading of Adorno Through Thomas Mann's Dr Faustus.Dan Webb - 2009 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 35 (5):517-531.
    In this article, I explore the relationship between the philosophy of Theodor Adorno and the Bilderverbot , or biblical Second Commandment against images. My starting point is J. F. Lyotard's construction of the melancholic sublime in his essay `What is the Postmodern?', which I argue he uses to critique Adorno's aesthetics, and, more generally, his position as a `modern' thinker. To prove that Lyotard had Adorno in mind when he constructed the category of the melancholic sublime, I return to an (...)
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  2.  1
    Declensions of the Self: A Bestiary of Modernity.Jean-Jacques Defert, Trevor Tchir & Dan Webb (eds.) - 2008 - Cambridge Scholars Press.
    This work is a collective reflection on the modern self as a narrative. Modernity as a metamorphic conglomeration of permeating discourses, new practices and institutional forms, a historical unfolding of centrifugal and centripetal discursive dynamics of regulation and normalization offers limitless grounds for a critical investigation. The modern self, both as the revelation of the inner self and as a reflection of the collective, arises from the dialogical interplay within the intersubjective communicative space of social discourse. The bestiary proposed in (...)
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    Urban Common Property: Notes Towards a Political Theory of the City.Dan Webb - 2014 - Radical Philosophy Review 17 (2):371-394.
    In this article I make three inter-related arguments. First, I argue that contemporary critical political theory should re-assert the city as a privileged site of political action. Second, I suggest that in the process of such a re-assertion, the dominant “open” conception of the city, characteristic of much critical urban studies, should be reworked in order to be properly “political”; that is, framed within an agonistic, Left-Schmittian model of politics. Finally, I claim that one way to “politicize” the city in (...)
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