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Profile: Daniel Berthold (Bard College)
  1.  45
    Talking Cures: A Lacanian Reading of Hegel and Kierkegaard on Language and Madness.Daniel Berthold - 2009 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 16 (4):299-311.
  2.  42
    Kierkegaard and Camus: Either/Or? [REVIEW]Daniel Berthold - 2013 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 73 (2):137-150.
    The philosophies of Søren Kierkegaard and Albert Camus have typically been considered as inverted images of each other. Kierkegaard turns to faith in God as a path of redemption from meaninglessness while Camus rejects faith as a form of intellectual suicide and cowardice. I argue that an analysis of key terms of contest—faith and lucidity, revolt and suicide, Abraham and Sisyphus, despair and its overcoming—serves to blur the lines of contrast, making Kierkegaard and Camus much closer in their views of (...)
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  3.  15
    The Author as Stranger.Daniel Berthold - 2012 - Idealistic Studies 42 (2-3):227-246.
    I argue that not only do Nietzsche and Camus share a sense of the world as fundamentally “strange,” but that each adopts an authorial position as stranger to the reader as well. The various strategies of concealment, evasion, and silence they employ to assure their authorial strangeness are in the service of what Roland Barthes and Michel Foucault would later call “the death of the author,” the disappearance of the author as authority over his or her own text. I argue (...)
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  4.  27
    The Author as Stranger: Nietzsche and Camus.Daniel Berthold - 2012 - Idealistic Studies 42 (2-3):227-246.
    I argue that not only do Nietzsche and Camus share a sense of the world as fundamentally “strange,” but that each adopts an authorial position as stranger to the reader as well. The various strategies of concealment, evasion, and silence they employ to assure their authorial strangeness are in the service of what Roland Barthes and Michel Foucault would later call “the death of the author,” the disappearance of the author as authority over his or her own text. I argue (...)
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  5.  33
    Talking Cures, the Clinic, and the Value of the Ineffable.Daniel Berthold - 2009 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 16 (4):325-328.
  6.  24
    Live or Tell.Daniel Berthold - 2006 - Philosophy and Literature 30 (2):361-377.
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  7.  17
    Passing-Over: The Death of the Author in Hegel's Philosophy.Daniel Berthold - 2009 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 47 (1):25-47.
    Criticism of Hegel has been a central preoccupation of “postmodern” philosophy, from critical theory and deconstruction to Lacanianpsychoanalytic theory and Foucauldian “archaeology.” One of the most frequent criticisms is that Hegel’s invocation of “absolute knowledge”installs him in a position of authorial arrogance, of God-like authority, leaving the reader in a position of subservience to the Sage’s perfectwisdom. The argument of this article is that this sort of criticism is profoundly ironic, since Hegel’s construction of the role of the Sage possessing (...)
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  8.  2
    A Penchant For Disguise: The Death of the Author in Kierkegaard and Nietzsche.Daniel Berthold - 2010 - Clio: A Journal of Literature, History, and the Philosophy of History 39 (3):333-358.
    This chapter situates Kierkegaard's commitment to death in companionship with a similar, if not identical, commitment on the part of Friedrich Nietzsche. Both conceptualize the relation between self and other as occurring across an abyss of difference that dissolves the authority of the author, and adhere to a philosophy of language in which the author's text becomes infinitely interpretable according to the position occupied by the reader. But notwithstanding the inventiveness with which Kierkegaard and Nietzsche practice the art of dying, (...)
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  9.  1
    Passing-Over: The Death of the Author in Hegel’s Philosophy.Daniel Berthold - 2009 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 47 (1):25-47.
    Criticism of Hegel has been a central preoccupation of “postmodern” philosophy, from critical theory and deconstruction to Lacanianpsychoanalytic theory and Foucauldian “archaeology.” One of the most frequent criticisms is that Hegel’s invocation of “absolute knowledge”installs him in a position of authorial arrogance, of God-like authority, leaving the reader in a position of subservience to the Sage’s perfectwisdom. The argument of this article is that this sort of criticism is profoundly ironic, since Hegel’s construction of the role of the Sage possessing (...)
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  10.  3
    Giorgio Agamben, The Sacrament of Language (Palo Alto: Stanford University Press, 2011).Daniel Berthold - 2011 - Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 32 (1).
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  11. A Question Of Style: Hegel and Kierkegaard on Language, Communication, and the Ethics of Authorship.Daniel Berthold - 2006 - Clio 35:179-200.
     
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  12. The Author as Stranger: Nietzsche and Camus.Daniel Berthold - 2012 - Idealistic Studies 42 (2-3):227-246.
    I argue that not only do Nietzsche and Camus share a sense of the world as fundamentally “strange,” but that each adopts an authorial position as stranger to the reader as well. The various strategies of concealment, evasion, and silence they employ to assure their authorial strangeness are in the service of what Roland Barthes and Michel Foucault would later call “the death of the author,” the disappearance of the author as authority over his or her own text. I argue (...)
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