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Daniel Brauner [4]Daniel J. Brauner [4]
  1.  19
    Ethics and the Daily Language of Medical Discourse.Suzanne Poirier & Daniel J. Brauner - 1988 - Hastings Center Report 18 (4):5-9.
    The standard medical case report often reduces patients and caregivers to complexes of medical facts and clinical decisions. Restructuring the genre itself to acknowledge the human dimensions of both patients and physicians allows questions of human values to regain their stature as integral components of the discourse.
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  2. The voices of the medical record.Suzanne Poirier & Daniel J. Brauner - 1990 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 11 (1).
    The medical record, as a managerial, historic, and legal document, serves many purposes. Although its form may be well established and many of the cases documented in it routine in medical experience, what is written in the medical record nevertheless records decisions and actions of individuals. Viewed as an interpretive text, it can itself become the object of interpretation. This essay applies literary theory and methodology to the structure, content, and writing style(s) of an actual medical record for the purpose (...)
     
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  3.  32
    History Matters.Caitjan Gainty, Geoffrey Rees & Daniel Brauner - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (1):76-77.
  4.  28
    The Structure of Autonomy–Paternalism: An Exercise in Framing and Reframing.Daniel J. Brauner - 2016 - American Journal of Bioethics 16 (8):15-17.
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  5.  11
    Organ Donation among Undocumented Hispanic Immigrants: An Assessment of Knowledge and Attitudes.Joshua Baru, Brian Lucas, Carmen Martinez & Daniel Brauner - 2013 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 24 (4):364-372.
    BackgroundUndocumented immigrants can donate their organs, but lack access to organ transplantation. This challenges foundational principles of organ donation: fairness and informed consent. Little is known about undocumented immigrants’ knowledge of barriers to their access to organ transplantation or how this might affect their decision to donate their organs.MethodsThe study was performed in an urban, university-affiliated, safety-net hospital. We interviewed hospitalized patients who selfidentified as undocumented immigrants and were unaware of having any contraindication to organ donation (for example, cancer). We (...)
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  6.  25
    How a Model Based on Linguistic Theory Can Improve the Assessment of Decision-Making Capacity for Persons with Dementia.Daniel J. Brauner & Susan E. Merel - 2006 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 17 (2):139-148.
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  7.  10
    Never a Simple Choice: Claude S. Beck and the Definitional Surplus in Decision-Making About CPR.Geoffrey Rees, Caitjan Gainty & Daniel Brauner - 2014 - Medicine Studies 4 (1):91-101.
    Each time patients and their families are asked to make a decision about resuscitation, they are also asked to engage the political, social, and cultural concerns that have shaped its history. That history is exemplified in the career of Claude S. Beck, arguably the most influential researcher and teacher of resuscitation in the twentieth century. Careful review of Beck’s work discloses that the development and popularization of the techniques of resuscitation proceeded through a multiplication of definitions of death. CPR consequently (...)
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  8.  63
    Never a Simple Choice: Claude S. Beck and the Definitional Surplus in Decision-Making About CPR. [REVIEW]Geoffrey Rees, Caitjan Gainty & Daniel Brauner - 2014 - Medicine Studies 4 (1):91-101.
    Each time patients and their families are asked to make a decision about resuscitation, they are also asked to engage the political, social, and cultural concerns that have shaped its history. That history is exemplified in the career of Claude S. Beck, arguably the most influential researcher and teacher of resuscitation in the twentieth century. Careful review of Beck’s work discloses that the development and popularization of the techniques of resuscitation proceeded through a multiplication of definitions of death. CPR consequently (...)
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