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  1.  6
    A Criticism of a False Idealism and Onward to Hegel.Daniel E. Shannon - 1995 - The Owl of Minerva 27 (1):19-36.
    Many of you may be familiar with what is today called the “Gaia hypothesis.” It consists in the thesis that the earth is a super-organism that exhibits specific properties of life: It regulates its own temperature, “excretes” waste, combats poisonous “infections,” and the like. In a word, it maintains homoeostasis. The hypothesis has supposedly been established by using a scientific method: the proposal of a hypothesis putatively based on observation and the reasonable explanation of the data. It was offered ostensibly (...)
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  2.  7
    Hegel’s Criticism of Analogical Procedure and the Search For Final Purpose.Daniel E. Shannon - 1988 - The Owl of Minerva 19 (2):169-182.
    In the section called “Observation of Nature” in the Phenomenology of Spirit, Hegel considers and criticizes a particular form of methodology which seeks final purposes by analogy. Through this methodology what is essential for thought is the recognition and demarcation of differentiae, which are imputed to natural objects as qualities by which things maintain their distinct and separate character - what Hegel calls their “being-for-self.” By these differentiae, then, the objects are categorized into types, or “natural kinds,” which, in turn, (...)
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  3.  8
    Hegel.Daniel E. Shannon - 1996 - Philosophy and Theology 9 (3-4):351-388.
    This paper considers Hegel’s treatment of the dispute between modern philosophy and faith in his Phenomenology of Spirit. The paper shows that Hegel is concerned with this dispute as part of his systematic program to advance the true philosophical concept of self and world, but, by so doing, he supports ahumanistic reconciliation between Christianity and the secular values of the Enlightenment. The paper contains extensive discussions of Hegel’s views on the French philosophes, and it shows how he used their writings (...)
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  4.  11
    Dialectic and Gospel in the Development of Hegel’s Thinking. [REVIEW]Daniel E. Shannon - 2001 - The Owl of Minerva 32 (2):206-212.
    This work focuses on Hegel’s development concerning his philosophy of religion, beginning with his school days at Stuttgart, and ending with the publication of the Phenomenology of Spirit. The first half of the book is devoted to Hegel’s thought prior to the composition of the Phenomenology of Spirit, and the second half is devoted to a reading and interpretation of those chapters in the Phenomenology which concern religion. Unlike other interpreters of Hegel’s development, Crites is concerned principally with understanding Hegel’s (...)
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    Sublime Understanding: Aesthetic Reflection in Kant and Hegel. [REVIEW]Daniel E. Shannon - 2002 - Review of Metaphysics 56 (2):450-451.
    This study concerns the role of reflective judgment in both aesthetical appreciation and one’s self-understanding in relation to an unfamiliar other. Pillow’s thesis is that “Sublime reflection can provide … a model for a kind of interpretive response to the uncanny Other ‘outside’ our conceptual grasp. It thereby advances our sense-making pursuits even while eschewing unified, conceptual determination”. His principal focus is on Kant’s development of sublime judgment in the third Critique, where this form of reflective judgment becomes central to (...)
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  6.  6
    The God Within. [REVIEW]Daniel E. Shannon - 1999 - The Owl of Minerva 31 (1):79-87.
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