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  1.  19
    The sociocognitive approach in critical discourse studies and the phenomenological sociology of knowledge: intersections.Daniel Gyollai - 2022 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 21 (3):539-558.
    This article argues that phenomenological sociology has great potential to provide a strong theoretical support to the Sociocognitive Approach in Critical Discourse Studies. SCA is interested in the interconnections between knowledge, discourse and society while placing subjectivity in the centre of its framework. It looks into the correlative relationship between personal- and socially shared knowledge, and the significance of these correlations to discourse production and interpretation. Analogously, phenomenological sociology explores the interrelated structures of subjectivity, knowledge and the social world. It (...)
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  2.  15
    Getting into it in the wrong way: Interpretative phenomenological analysis and the hermeneutic circle.Daniel Gyollai - 2020 - Nursing Philosophy 21 (2):e12294.
    This article critically analyses the hermeneutic commitment of interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA). In the theoretical framework of IPA, the role of preconceptions and prejudices is consistently downplayed; priority is given to the participant's own words. Paley has argued that IPA’s interpretative phase is always and necessarily determined by the researcher's fore‐conceptions, as opposed to the participant's narrative. I demonstrate that IPA’s failure to recognize the importance of an external frame of reference in interpretation may arise from the misunderstanding of the (...)
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  3.  13
    The Role of Relevance in Stereotyping: a Schutzian Approach to Social Categorisation.Daniel Gyollai - 2022 - Human Studies 45 (4):613-628.
    This article demonstrates that Alfred Schutz’s theory of _typification_ and _relevance_ together have a great potential to conceptually clarify certain aspects of self-categorisation theory. More specifically, it focuses on the motivational bases of stereotyping, one of the core mechanisms underlying the categorisation of people into groups. Social psychologists have found that stereotyping of out-group members is motivated by factors, such as uncertainty reduction, or the enhancement of the self-esteem of in-group members. What categories and corresponding stereotypes are being activated and (...)
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