Results for 'Daniel H. Prank'

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  1. Terence Irwin, A History of Western Philosophy: I Classical Thought . Pp. Xii + 266. ISBN 0-19-219296 & 0-19-289177-4.Daniel H. Prank - 1990 - Polis: The Journal for Ancient Greek Political Thought 9 (2):214-219.
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  2.  45
    H. Richard Niebuhr's Reading of George Herbert Mead: Correcting, Completing, and Looking Ahead.Joshua Daniel - 2016 - Journal of Religious Ethics 44 (1):92-115.
    In this essay, I reconstruct H. Richard Niebuhr's interpretation of George Herbert Mead's account of the social constitution of the self. Specifically, I correct Niebuhr's interpretation, because it mischaracterizes Mead's understanding of social constitution as more dialogical than ecological. I also argue that Niebuhr's interpretation needs completing because it fails to engage one of Mead's more significant notions, the I/me distinction within the self. By reconstructing Niebuhr's account of faith and responsibility as theologically self-constitutive through Mead's I/me distinction, I demonstrate (...)
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  3.  37
    Robust Liberalism: H. Richard Niebuhr and the Ethics of American Public Life by Timothy A. Beach-Verhey (Review).Joshua L. Daniel - 2013 - American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 34 (2):189-192.
    Those most intimate with the works of H. Richard Niebuhr, who return to them time after time for theological and ethical sustenance, know that they exemplify a more interesting thinker than his brother, Reinhold. Of course, Reinhold was and remains the more public figure, read seriously in his time by politicians and theologians, celebrated by our current president, and enjoying renewed scholarly interest resulting in new editions of out-of-print works and a number of critical studies. Meanwhile, H. Richard continues to (...)
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  4.  14
    The History of Al-Tabarī, Vol. XXXI: The War Between Brothers, A. D. 809-813/A. H. 193-198The History of Al-Tabari, Vol. XXXI: The War Between Brothers, A. D. 809-813/A. H. 193-198. [REVIEW]Elton L. Daniel & Michael Fishbein - 1994 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 114 (2):282.
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  5. John Toland: His Methods, Manners, and Mind.Stephen H. Daniel - 1984 - Mcgill-Queen's University Press.
    This study is the first sympathetic philosophical treatment in English of the complete works of John Toland . Professor Daniel presents Toland as a champion of religious toleration and civil liberty whose writing is important because it brings together many of the ideas, themes, and controversies that dominated the early modern period in Europe. Best known for his call for common-sense thinking in the deist manifesto Christianity Not Mysterious, Toland gained notoriety as editor and biographer of Milton, Harrington, and (...)
     
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  6.  23
    Darius the Mede: A Study in Historical Identification.K. H. - 1959 - Review of Metaphysics 13 (1):192-192.
    An attempt to justify the historical references to Darius the Mede in the Book of Daniel.--K. H.
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  7.  16
    Montréal Conference Summaries.Stephen H. Daniel & Sébastien Charles - 2012 - Berkeley Studies 23:54-57.
    In June of 2012 scholars from Europe and North America met in Montreal to commemorate the 300th anniversary of the publication of George Berkeley's *Passive Obedience*. In this article Stephen Daniel summarizes the English presentations, and Sébastien Charles summarizes the French presentations, on how Berkeley invokes naturalistic themes in developing a moral theory while still allowing a role for God.
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  8.  9
    Approaches to Education for Character: Strategies for Change in Higher Education.S. O. H. - 1969 - Review of Metaphysics 23 (2):361-362.
    These papers were delivered at the 1966 Meeting of the Conference on Science, Philosophy, and Religion in Their Relation to the Democratic Way of Life. They all deal in some way with education and professional training, although, in spite of the subtitle's enticement, there is almost no discussion of strategy for change in higher education. There is much hard analysis of what is going on in higher education and even a little musing about how things might or should be, but (...)
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    Cellular Mechanisms of Long-Term Depression in the Cerebellum.F. Crépel, N. Hemart, D. Jaillard & H. Daniel - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (3):347-353.
  10. Piow Capture.H. Daniel - 1968 - In Peter Koestenbaum (ed.), Proceedings. [San Jose? Calif.. pp. 1--291.
     
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  11. How Berkeley Redefines Substance.Stephen H. Daniel - 2013 - Berkeley Studies 24:40-50.
    In several essays I have argued that Berkeley maintains the same basic notion of spiritual substance throughout his life. Because that notion is not the traditional (Aristotelian, Cartesian, or Lockean) doctrine of substance, critics (e.g., John Roberts, Tom Stoneham, Talia Mae Bettcher, Margaret Atherton, Walter Ott, Marc Hight) claim that on my reading Berkeley either endorses a Humean notion of substance or has no recognizable theory of substance at all. In this essay I point out how my interpretation does not (...)
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  12. Berkeley on God's Knowledge of Pain.Stephen H. Daniel - 2018 - In Stefan Storrie (ed.), Berkeley's Three Dialogues: New Essays. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 136-145.
    Since nothing about God is passive, and the perception of pain is inherently passive, then it seems that God does not know what it is like to experience pain. Nor would he be able to cause us to experience pain, for his experience would then be a sensation (which would require God to have senses, which he does not). My suggestion is that Berkeley avoids this situation by describing how God knows about pain “among other things” (i.e. as something whose (...)
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  13. Berkeley, Hobbes, and the Constitution of the Self.Stephen H. Daniel - 2015 - In Sébastien Charles (ed.), Berkeley Revisited: Moral, Social and Political Philosophy. Voltaire Foundation. pp. 69-81.
    By focusing on the exchange between Descartes and Hobbes on how the self is related to its activities, Berkeley draws attention to how he and Hobbes explain the forensic constitution of human subjectivity and moral/political responsibility in terms of passive obedience and conscientious submission to the laws of the sovereign. Formulated as the language of nature or as pronouncements of the supreme political power, those laws identify moral obligations by locating political subjects within those networks of sensible signs. When thus (...)
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  14. Berkeley's Stoic Notion of Spiritual Substance.Stephen H. Daniel - 2008 - In New Interpretations of Berkeley's Thought. Humanity Books.
    For Berkeley, minds are not Cartesian spiritual substances because they cannot be said to exist (even if only conceptually) abstracted from their activities. Similarly, Berkeley's notion of mind differs from Locke's in that, for Berkeley, minds are not abstract substrata in which ideas inhere. Instead, Berkeley redefines what it means for the mind to be a substance in a way consistent with the Stoic logic of 17th century Ramists on which Leibniz and Jonathan Edwards draw. This view of mind, I (...)
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  15. Berkeley's Pantheistic Discourse.Stephen H. Daniel - 2001 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 49 (3):179-194.
    Berkeley's immaterialism has more in common with views developed by Henry More, the mathematician Joseph Raphson, John Toland, and Jonathan Edwards than those of thinkers with whom he is commonly associated (e.g., Malebranche and Locke). The key for recognizing their similarities lies in appreciating how they understand St. Paul's remark that in God "we live and move and have our being" as an invitation to think to God as the space of discourse in which minds and ideas are identified. This (...)
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  16. The Ramist Context of Berkeley's Philosophy.Stephen H. Daniel - 2001 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 9 (3):487 – 505.
    Berkeley's doctrines about mind, the language of nature, substance, minima sensibilia, notions, abstract ideas, inference, and freedom appropriate principles developed by the 16th-century logician Peter Ramus and his 17th-century followers (e.g., Alexander Richardson, William Ames, John Milton). Even though Berkeley expresses himself in Cartesian or Lockean terms, he relies on a Ramist way of thinking that is not a form of mere rhetoric or pedagogy but a logic and ontology grounded in Stoicism. This article summarizes the central features of Ramism, (...)
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  17. Berkeley's Christian Neoplatonism, Archetypes, and Divine Ideas.Stephen H. Daniel - 2001 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 39 (2):239-258.
    Berkeley's doctrine of archetypes explains how God perceives and can have the same ideas as finite minds. His appeal of Christian neo-Platonism opens up a way to understand how the relation of mind, ideas, and their union is modeled on the Cappadocian church fathers' account of the persons of the trinity. This way of understanding Berkeley indicates why he, in contrast to Descartes or Locke, thinks that mind (spiritual substance) and ideas (the object of mind) cannot exist or be thought (...)
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  18. Berkeley's Rejection of Divine Analogy.Stephen H. Daniel - 2011 - Science Et Esprit 63 (2):149-161.
    Berkeley argues that claims about divine predication (e.g., God is wise or exists) should be understood literally rather than analogically, because like all spirits (i.e., causes), God is intelligible only in terms of the extent of his effects. By focusing on the harmony and order of nature, Berkeley thus unites his view of God with his doctrines of mind, force, grace, and power, and avoids challenges to religious claims that are raised by appeals to analogy. The essay concludes by showing (...)
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  19.  37
    Rudolf A. Makkreel and Frithjof Rodi, Editors. "Wilhelm Dilthey: Selected Works". Vol. 5: "Poetry and Experience". [REVIEW]Stephen H. Daniel - 1986 - New Vico Studies 4:175.
  20. Stoicism in Berkeley's Philosophy.Stephen H. Daniel - 2011 - In Bertil Belfrage & Timo Airaksinen (eds.), Berkeley's Lasting Legacy: 300 Years Later. Cambridge Scholars Press. pp. 121-34.
    Commentators have not said much regarding Berkeley and Stoicism. Even when they do, they generally limit their remarks to Berkeley’s Siris (1744) where he invokes characteristically Stoic themes about the World Soul, “seminal reasons,” and the animating fire of the universe. The Stoic heritage of other Berkeleian doctrines (e.g., about mind or the semiotic character of nature) is seldom recognized, and when it is, little is made of it in explaining his other doctrines (e.g., immaterialism). None of this is surprising, (...)
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  21. Edwards' Occasionalism.Stephen H. Daniel - 2010 - In Don Schweitzer (ed.), Jonathan Edwards as Contemporary. Peter Lang. pp. 1-14.
    Instead of focusing on the Malebranche-Edwards connection regarding occasionalism as if minds are distinct from the ideas they have, I focus on how finite minds are particular expressions of God's will that there be the distinctions by which ideas are identified and differentiated. This avoids problems, created in the accounts of Fiering, Lee, and especially Crisp, about the inherently idealist character of Edwards' occasionalism.
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  22. Berkeley, Suárez, and the Esse-Existere Distinction.Stephen H. Daniel - 2000 - American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 74 (4):621-636.
    For Berkeley, a thing's existence 'esse' is nothing more than its being perceived 'as that thing'. It makes no sense to ask (with Samuel Johnson) about the 'esse' of the mind or the specific act of perception, for that would be like asking what it means for existence to exist. Berkeley's "existere is percipi or percipere" (NB 429) thus carefully adopts the scholastic distinction between 'esse' and 'existere' ignored by Locke and others committed to a substantialist notion of mind. Following (...)
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  23. Berkeley's Doctrine of Mind and the “Black List Hypothesis”: A Dialogue.Stephen H. Daniel - 2013 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 51 (1):24-41.
    Clues about what Berkeley was planning to say about mind in his now-lost second volume of the Principles seem to abound in his Notebooks. However, commentators have been reluctant to use his unpublished entries to explicate his remarks about spiritual substances in the Principles and Dialogues for three reasons. First, it has proven difficult to reconcile the seemingly Humean bundle theory of the self in the Notebooks with Berkeley's published characterization of spirits as “active beings or principles.” Second, the fact (...)
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  24. Edwards as Philosopher.Stephen H. Daniel - 2007 - In Stephen J. Stein (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Jonathan Edwards. Cambridge University Press. pp. 162-80.
  25. How Berkeley's Works Are Interpreted.Stephen H. Daniel - 2010 - In Silvia Parigi (ed.), George Berkeley: Science and Religion in the Age of Enlightenment. Springer.
    Instead of interpreting Berkeley in terms of the standard way of relating him to Descartes, Malebranche, and Locke, I suggest we consider relating him to other figures (e.g., Stoics, Ramists, Suarez, Spinoza, Leibniz). This allows us to integrate his published and unpublished work, and reveals how his philosophic and non-philosophic work are much more aligned with one another. I indicate how his (1) theory of powers, (2) "bundle theory" of the mind, and (3) doctrine of "innate ideas" are understood in (...)
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  26. Fringes And Transitive States In William James' Concept Of The Stream Of Thought.Stephen H. Daniel - 1976 - Auslegung 3:64-78.
  27. Les limites de la philosophie naturelle de Berkeley.Stephen H. Daniel - 2004 - In Sébastien Charles (ed.), Science et épistémologie selon Berkeley. Presses de l’Université Laval. pp. 163-70.
    (Original French text followed by English version.) For Berkeley, mathematical and scientific issues and concepts are always conditioned by epistemological, metaphysical, and theological considerations. For Berkeley to think of any thing--whether it be a geometrical figure or a visible or tangible object--is to think of it in terms of how its limits make it intelligible. Especially in De Motu, he highlights the ways in which limit concepts (e.g., cause) mark the boundaries of science, metaphysics, theology, and morality.
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  28.  32
    Reexamining Berkeley's Philosophy.Stephen H. Daniel (ed.) - 2007 - University of Toronto Press.
    This collection confronts the question: how can we know anything about the world if all we know are our ideas?
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  29.  15
    C.J. Mccracken And I.C. Tipton, Eds., Berkeley's Principles And Dialogues: Background Source Materials. [REVIEW]Stephen H. Daniel - 2001 - Philosophy in Review 21 (5):362-364.
  30.  21
    Berkeley's Non-Cartesian Notion of Spiritual Substance.Stephen H. Daniel - 2018 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 56 (4):659-682.
    As central as the notion of mind is for Berkeley, it is not surprising that what he means by mind stirs debate. At issue are questions about not only what kind of thing a mind is but also how we can know it. This convergence of ontological and epistemological interests in discussing mind has led some commentators to argue that Berkeley's appeal to the Cartesian vocabulary of 'spiritual substance' signals his appropriation of elements of Descartes's theory of mind. But in (...)
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  31. Introduction.Stephen H. Daniel - 2007 - In Reexamining Berkeley's Philosophy.
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  32.  12
    Substance and Person: Berkeley on Descartes and Locke.Stephen H. Daniel - 2018 - Ruch Filozoficzny 74 (4):7.
    In his post-1720 works, Berkeley focuses his comments about Descartes on mechanism and about Locke on general abstract ideas. He warns against using metaphysical principles to explain observed regularities, and he extends his account to include spiritual substances (including God). Indeed, by calling a substance a spirit, he emphasizes how a person is simply the will that ideas be differentiated and associated in a certain way, not some <i>thing</i> that engages in differentiation. In this sense, a substance cannot be conceived (...)
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  33.  60
    Metaphor in the Historiography of Philosophy.Stephen H. Daniel - 1986 - Clio: A Journal of Literature, History, and the Philosophy of History 15 (2):191-210.
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  34.  28
    Edwards, Berkeley, and Ramist Logic.Stephen H. Daniel - 2001 - Idealistic Studies 31 (1):55-72.
    I will suggest that we can begin to see why Edwards and Berkeley sound so much alike by considering how both think of minds or spiritual substances notas things modeled on material bodies but as the acts by which things are identified. Those acts cannot be described using the Aristotelian subject-predicatelogic on which the metaphysics of substance, properties, attributes, or modes is based because subjects, substances, etc. are themselves initially distinguishedthrough such acts. To think of mind as opposed to matter, (...)
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  35.  9
    The Semiotic Ontology of Edwards, Jonathan.Stephen H. Daniel - 1994 - Modern Schoolman 71 (4):285-304.
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  36. New Interpretations of Berkeley's Thought.Stephen H. Daniel (ed.) - 2007 - Humanity Books.
    In this set of previously unpublished essays, noted scholars from North America and Europe describe how the Irish philosopher George Berkeley (1684-1753) continues to inspire debates about his views on knowledge, reality, God, freedom, mathematics, and religion. Here discussions about Berkeley's account of physical objects, minds, and God's role in human experience are resolved within explicitly ethical and theological contexts. This collection uses debates about Berkeley's immaterialism and theory of ideas to open up a discussion of how divine activity and (...)
     
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  37.  25
    The Harmony of the Leibniz-Berkeley Juxtaposition.Stephen H. Daniel - 2007 - In P. Phemister & S. Brown (eds.), Leibniz and the English-Speaking World. Springer. pp. 163--180.
  38.  65
    "Spinoza on Knowing, Being and Freedom," Ed. J. G. Van der Bend. [REVIEW]Stephen H. Daniel - 1976 - Modern Schoolman 53 (3):329-330.
  39.  33
    Pierre Gassendi and the Birth of Early Modern Philosophy. [REVIEW]Stephen H. Daniel - 2008 - International Philosophical Quarterly 48 (3):410-412.
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  40.  32
    Gayle L. Ormiston and Alan D. Schrift, Editors. "Transforming the Hermeneutic Context: From Nietzsche to Nancy". [REVIEW]Stephen H. Daniel - 1990 - New Vico Studies 8:127.
  41. Myth and Modern Philosophy.Stephen H. Daniel - 1990 - Temple University Press.
    A study of the historiographic significance and use of mythic or fabular thinking in Bacon, Descartes, Mandeville, Vico, Herder, and others.
     
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  42.  6
    Prosocial Behavior and Friendship Quality as Moderators of the Association Between Anxious Withdrawal and Peer Experiences in Portuguese Young Adolescents.Miguel Freitas, António J. Santos, Olívia Ribeiro, João R. Daniel & Kenneth H. Rubin - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  43.  5
    M. Hobbes and America: Exploring the Constitutional Foundations. [REVIEW]Stephen H. Daniel - 1983 - Review of Metaphysics 36 (3):698-699.
    Though some of the critical reviews of Frank M. Coleman's Hobbes and America have alluded to the affinities of his work to that of Strauss, Macpherson, Laslett, and Oakeshott, most have ignored Coleman's specifically philosophic treatment of Hobbes as the foundational thinker most responsive to political realities which emerge in the seventeenth century and still characterize American politics. Coleman's purpose is to demonstrate how the operative American constitutional philosophy can be recognized clearly only when understood in the context of its (...)
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  44.  40
    Preparations for a Research Paper in Philosophy.Stephen H. Daniel - 1979 - Teaching Philosophy 3 (2):185-188.
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  45.  30
    The Semiotic Ontology of Jonathan Edwards.Stephen H. Daniel - 1994 - Modern Schoolman 71 (4):285-304.
    Jonathan Edwards' marginalization in modern philosophy stems from his refusal to endorse the predicational logic and substantialist ontology of the rationalist-empiricist debate. Instead, he appeals to a communicative, semiotic logic of propositions grounded in Stoic thought and thematized by Peter Ramus and his Puritan followers. That alternative logic displays an "ontology of supposition" that guarantees God's existence, justifies typological, magical, and even astrological inferences, undermines modernist dichotomies (e.g., between mind and matter), and invalidates efforts to speak of Edwards' thought in (...)
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  46.  36
    Berkeley and Spinoza.Stephen H. Daniel - 2010 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 135 (1):123-134.
    There is a widespread assumption that Berkeley and Spinoza have little in common, even though early Jesuit critics in France often linked them. Later commentators have also recognized their similarities. My essay focuses on how Berkeley 's comments on the Arnauld-Malebranche debate regarding objective and formal reality and his treatment of god's creation of finite minds within the order of nature relate his theory of knowledge to his doctrine in a way similar to that of Spinoza. On estime souvent que (...)
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  47. Lawrence J. Hatab, Myth and Philosophy: A Contest of Truths. [REVIEW]Stephen H. Daniel - 1991 - Philosophy in Review 11 (5):324-326.
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  48.  5
    Seventeenth-Century Scholastic Treatments of Time.Stephen H. Daniel - 1981 - Journal of the History of Ideas 42 (4):587-606.
  49.  29
    The Narrative Character of Myth and Philosophy in Vico.Stephen H. Daniel - 1988 - International Studies in Philosophy 20 (1):1-9.
  50.  22
    Vico on Mythic Figuration as Prerequisite for Philosophic Literacy.Stephen H. Daniel - 1985 - New Vico Studies 3:61-72.
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