Results for 'Daniel J. Peterson'

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  1. Methodological Naturalism.Daniel J. McKaughan & Erik L. Peterson - 2013 - In Robert Fastiggi (ed.), New Catholic Encyclopedia (Supplement 2012-13: Ethics and Philosophy). Gale-Cengage Learning.
  2.  34
    Jacob Boehme and Paul Tillich: A Reassessment of the Mystical Philosopher and Systematic Theologian.Daniel J. Peterson - 2006 - Religious Studies 42 (2):225.
    Jacob Boehme, the seventeenth-century mystical philosopher, had a significant influence upon Paul Tillich. In this article I offer a reassessment of the relationship between these two thinkers by arguing for an orthodox interpretation of Boehme's doctrine of God that links him more closely with Tillich than recent commentators have suggested. Specifically, I show how Boehme and Tillich stand united against the heterodox Hegel in their presentation of a dynamic process of divinity's self-differentiation and reconciliation that completes itself apart from history (...)
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  3.  16
    Knowledge as Agreement: Inviting Indigenous Innuendo.Daniel J. Peterson - unknown
    By contrasting rational knowledge with relational knowledge, this paper discusses the forming of agreements as the pursuit of knowledge. Knowledge as agreement is thus discussed in this paper via research methods including ‘autoethnography’ . Pursuing knowledge by virtue of agreements is subsequently valued after positioning the author as a non-Indigenous ‘dagay’, positioning the paper itself as a dissertation, and after assuming an initial relationship between the reader and author. The paper occurs within the cultural context of ‘academia’. Once rational knowledge (...)
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  4.  18
    A Perfect Storm: Examining the Synergistic Effects of Negative and Positive Emotional Instability on Promoting Weight Loss Activities in Anorexia Nervosa.Edward A. Selby, Talea Cornelius, Kara B. Fehling, Amy Kranzler, Emily A. Panza, Jason M. Lavender, Stephen A. Wonderlich, Ross D. Crosby, Scott G. Engel, James E. Mitchell, Scott J. Crow, Carol B. Peterson & Daniel Le Grange - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  5. The Moral of the Story: Literature and Public Ethics.J. Patrick Dobel, Henry T. Edmondson Iii, Gregory R. Johnson, Peter Kalkavage, Judith Lee Kissell, Peter Augustine Lawler, Alan Levine, Daniel J. Mahoney, Will Morrisey, Pádraig Ó Gormaile, Paul C. Peterson, Michael Platt, Robert M. Schaefer, James Seaton & Juan José Sendín Vinagre - 2000 - Lexington Books.
    The contributors to The Moral of the Story, all preeminent political theorists, are unified by their concern with the instructive power of great literature. This thought-provoking combination of essays explores the polyvalent moral and political impact of classic world literatures on public ethics through the study of some of its major figures-including Shakespeare, Dante, Cervantes, Jane Austen, Henry James, Joseph Conrad, Robert Penn Warren, and Dostoevsky. Positing the uniqueness of literature's ability to promote dialogue on salient moral and intellectual virtues, (...)
     
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  6.  18
    Assessing Agricultural Education: Agricultural Economics at a Crossroads. [REVIEW]E. Wesley F. Peterson, Fred J. Ruppel & Daniel I. Padberg - 1988 - Agriculture and Human Values 5 (4):26-33.
    Colleges of agriculture are being forced to adapt to a changing world. The forces behind these changes affect all departments within the college. In this paper, the place of agricultural economics within the college and within the university is identified, the current situation facing the discipline is outlined, and strategies for responding to the forces of change are discussed. Three alternatives are available: continuation, termination, and metamorphosis. Different departments are likely to pursue different strategies. Some may disappear altogether or may (...)
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  7. Book Reviews. [REVIEW]Mark C. E. Peterson, Abrahim H. Khan, Charles Creegan, Matthew J. Mancini, Delno C. West & Daniel A. Dombrowski - 1989 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 25 (2).
     
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  8.  30
    Book Reviews Section 3.Roger R. Woock, Macauley Jr, John M. Beck, Janice F. Weaver, Patti Mcgill Peterson, Stanley L. Goldstein, A. Richard King, Don E. Post, Faustine C. Jones, Edward H. Berman, Thomas O. Monahan, William R. Hazard, J. Estill Alexander, William D. Page, Daniel S. Parkinson, Richard O. Dalbey, Frances J. Nesmith, William Rosenfield, Verne Keenan, Robert Girvan & Robert Gallacher - 1973 - Educational Studies 4 (2):84-99.
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  9.  18
    The Return of Radical Theology: A Critical Examination of Peterson and Zbaraschuk, Eds., Resurrecting the Death of God.George Shields - 2014 - Process Studies 43 (2):29-46.
    This review article critically examines the anthology Resurrecting the Death of God: The Origins, Influence, and Return of Radical Theology, edited by Daniel Peterson and G. Michael Zbaraschuk. After making brief but largely appreciative summary comments on a number of essays, the article focuses attention on contributions by John Cobb on the theology of Altizer, John Roth on Levinas, and J. W. Robbins on the politics of de Tocqueville's concept of God. Suggestions are provided for inclusion of a (...)
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  10. Gorillas in Our Midst: Sustained Inattentional Blindness for Dynamic Events.Daniel J. Simons & Christopher Chabris - 1999 - Perception 28 (9):1059-1074.
  11. First Outline of a System of the Philosophy of Nature.F. W. J. Schelling & Keith R. Peterson (eds.) - 2004 - State University of New York Press.
    Schelling's first systematic attempt to articulate a complete philosophy of nature.
     
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  12. Change Blindness: Past, Present, and Future.Daniel J. Simons & Ronald A. Rensink - 2005 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (1):16-20.
    Change blindness is the striking failure to see large changes that normally would be noticed easily. Over the past decade this phenomenon has greatly contributed to our understanding of attention, perception, and even consciousness. The surprising extent of change blindness explains its broad appeal, but its counterintuitive nature has also engendered confusions about the kinds of inferences that legitimately follow from it. Here we discuss the legitimate and the erroneous inferences that have been drawn, and offer a set of requirements (...)
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  13. Change Blindness.Daniel J. Simons & Daniel T. Levin - 1997 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 1 (1):241-82.
  14.  47
    Chimpanzee Minds: Suspiciously Human?Daniel J. Povinelli & Jennifer Vonk - 2003 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (4):157-160.
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    Film, Popular Entertainment, and the Melting Pot Through the Lens of Modernist Culture: Daniel J. Singal.Daniel J. Singal - 2013 - Modern Intellectual History 10 (2):489-501.
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  16. Rational Social and Political Polarization.Daniel J. Singer, Aaron Bramson, Patrick Grim, Bennett Holman, Jiin Jung, Karen Kovaka, Anika Ranginani & William J. Berger - 2019 - Philosophical Studies 176 (9):2243-2267.
    Public discussions of political and social issues are often characterized by deep and persistent polarization. In social psychology, it’s standard to treat belief polarization as the product of epistemic irrationality. In contrast, we argue that the persistent disagreement that grounds political and social polarization can be produced by epistemically rational agents, when those agents have limited cognitive resources. Using an agent-based model of group deliberation, we show that groups of deliberating agents using coherence-based strategies for managing their limited resources tend (...)
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  17. We Don't Need a Microscope to Explore the Chimpanzee's Mind.Daniel J. Povinelli & Jennifer Vonk - 2004 - Mind and Language 19 (1):1-28.
    The question of whether chimpanzees, like humans, reason about unobservable mental states remains highly controversial. On one account, chimpanzees are seen as possessing a psychological system for social cognition that represents and reasons about behaviors alone. A competing account allows that the chimpanzee's social cognition system additionally construes the behaviors it represents in terms of mental states. Because the range of behaviors that each of the two systems can generate is not currently known, and because the latter system depends upon (...)
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  18. We Don't Need a Microscope to Explore the Chimpanzee's Mind.Daniel J. Povinelli & Jennifer Vonk - 2006 - In Susan L. Hurley & Matthew Nudds (eds.), Rational Animals? Oxford University Press. pp. 1-28.
  19. What Epistemic Reasons Are For: Against the Belief-Sandwich Distinction.Daniel J. Singer & Sara Aronowitz - forthcoming - In Billy Dunaway & David Plunkett (eds.), Meaning, Decision, and Norms: Themes from the Work of Allan Gibbard.
    The standard view says that epistemic normativity is normativity of belief. If you’re an evidentialist, for example, you’ll think that all epistemic reasons are reasons to believe what your evidence supports. Here we present a line of argument that pushes back against this standard view. If the argument is right, there are epistemic reasons for things other than belief. The argument starts with evidentialist commitments and proceeds by a series of cases, each containing a reason. As the cases progress, the (...)
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  20.  7
    Change Blindness.Daniel J. Simons & Daniel T. Levin - 1997 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 1 (7):261-267.
  21. How to Be an Epistemic Consequentialist.Daniel J. Singer - 2018 - Philosophical Quarterly 68 (272):580-602.
    Epistemic consequentialists think that epistemic norms are about believing the truth and avoiding error. Recently, a number of authors have rejected epistemic consequentialism on the basis that it incorrectly sanctions tradeoffs of epistemic goodness. Here, I argue that epistemic consequentialists should borrow two lessons from ethical consequentialists to respond to these worries. Epistemic consequentialists should construe their view as an account of right belief, which they distinguish from other notions like rational and justified belief. Epistemic consequentialists should also make their (...)
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  22.  56
    Permissible Epistemic Trade-Offs.Daniel J. Singer - 2019 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 97 (2):281-293.
    ABSTRACTRecent rejections of epistemic consequentialism, like those from Firth, Jenkins, Berker, and Greaves, have argued that consequentialism is committed to objectionable trade-offs and suggest...
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  23.  93
    Current Approaches to Change Blindness.Daniel J. Simons - 2000 - Visual Cognition 7:1-15.
  24. Everything Flows: Towards a Processual Philosophy of Biology.Daniel J. Nicholson & John A. Dupre (eds.) - 2018 - Oxford University Press.
    This collection of essays explores the metaphysical thesis that the living world is not made up of substantial particles or things, as has often been assumed, but is rather constituted by processes. The biological domain is organised as an interdependent hierarchy of processes, which are stabilised and actively maintained at different timescales. Even entities that intuitively appear to be paradigms of things, such as organisms, are actually better understood as processes. Unlike previous attempts to articulate processual views of biology, which (...)
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  25. Attentional Capture and Inattentional Blindness.Daniel J. Simons - 2000 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 4 (4):147-155.
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    Diversity, Not Randomness, Trumps Ability.Daniel J. Singer - 2019 - Philosophy of Science 86 (1):178-191.
    A number of formal models, including a highly influential model from Hong and Page, purport to show that functionally diverse groups often beat groups of individually high-performing agents in solving problems. Thompson argues that in Hong and Page’s model, that the diverse groups are created by a random process explains their success, not the diversity. Here, I defend the diversity interpretation of the Hong and Page result. The failure of Thompson’s argument shows that to understand the value of functional diversity, (...)
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  27. Change Blindness in the Absence of a Visual Disruption.Daniel J. Simons, Steven Franconeri & Rebecca Reimer - 2000 - Perception 29 (10):1143-1154.
  28. Mind the Is-Ought Gap.Daniel J. Singer - 2015 - Journal of Philosophy 112 (4):193-210.
    The is-ought gap is Hume’s claim that we can’t get an ‘ought’ from just ‘is’s. Prior (“The Autonomy of Ethics,” 1960) showed that its most straightforward formulation, a staple of introductory philosophy classes, fails. Many authors attempt to resurrect the claim by restricting its domain syntactically or by reformulating it in terms of models of deontic logic. Those attempts prove to be complex, incomplete, or incorrect. I provide a simple reformulation of the is-ought gap that closely fits Hume’s description of (...)
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  29. The Concept of Mechanism in Biology.Daniel J. Nicholson - 2012 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 43 (1):152-163.
    The concept of mechanism in biology has three distinct meanings. It may refer to a philosophical thesis about the nature of life and biology (‘mechanicism’), to the internal workings of a machine-like structure (‘machine mechanism’), or to the causal explanation of a particular phenomenon (‘causal mechanism’). In this paper I trace the conceptual evolution of ‘mechanism’ in the history of biology, and I examine how the three meanings of this term have come to be featured in the philosophy of biology, (...)
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  30.  41
    Science, Community, and the Transformation of American Philosophy, 1860-1930.Daniel J. Wilson - 1990 - University of Chicago Press.
    In the first book-length study of American philosophy at the turn of the century, Daniel J. Wilson traces the formation of philosophy as an academic discipline. Wilson shows how the rise of the natural and physical sciences at the end of the nineteenth century precipitated a "crisis of confidence" among philosophers as to the role of their discipline. Deftly tracing the ways in which philosophers sought to incorporate scientific values and methods into their outlook and to redefine philosophy itself, (...)
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  31. Evidence for Preserved Representations in Change Blindness.Daniel J. Simons, Christopher Chabris & Tatiana Schnur - 2002 - Consciousness and Cognition 11 (1):78-97.
    People often fail to detect large changes to scenes, provided that the changes occur during a visual disruption. This phenomenon, known as ''change blindness,'' occurs both in the laboratory and in real-world situations in which changes occur unexpectedly. The pervasiveness of the inability to detect changes is consistent with the theoretical notion that we internally represent relatively little information from our visual world from one glance at a scene to the next. However, evidence for change blindness does not necessarily imply (...)
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  32. A New Direction for Science and Values.Daniel J. Hicks - 2014 - Synthese 191 (14):3271-95.
    The controversy over the old ideal of “value-free science” has cooled significantly over the past decade. Many philosophers of science now agree that even ethical and political values may play a substantial role in all aspects of scientific inquiry. Consequently, in the last few years, work in science and values has become more specific: Which values may influence science, and in which ways? Or, how do we distinguish illegitimate from illegitimate kinds of influence? In this paper, I argue that this (...)
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  33. Neither Logical Empiricism nor Vitalism, but Organicism: What the Philosophy of Biology Was.Daniel J. Nicholson & Richard Gawne - 2015 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 37 (4):345-381.
    Philosophy of biology is often said to have emerged in the last third of the twentieth century. Prior to this time, it has been alleged that the only authors who engaged philosophically with the life sciences were either logical empiricists who sought to impose the explanatory ideals of the physical sciences onto biology, or vitalists who invoked mystical agencies in an attempt to ward off the threat of physicochemical reduction. These schools paid little attention to actual biological science, and as (...)
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  34.  40
    Your Mind Wanders Weakly, Your Mind Wanders Deeply: Objective Measures Reveal Mindless Reading at Different Levels.Daniel J. Schad, Antje Nuthmann & Ralf Engbert - 2012 - Cognition 125 (2):179-194.
  35.  16
    An Abstract to Concrete Shift in the Development of Biological Thought: The Insides Story.Daniel J. Simons & Frank C. Keil - 1995 - Cognition 56 (2):129-163.
  36. Authentic Faith and Acknowledged Risk: Dissolving the Problem of Faith and Reason.Daniel J. McKaughan - 2013 - Religious Studies 49 (1):101-124.
    One challenge to the rationality of religious commitment has it that faith is unreasonable because it involves believing on insufficient evidence. However, this challenge and influential attempts to reply depend on assumptions about what it is to have faith that are open to question. I distinguish between three conceptions of faith each of which can claim some plausible grounding in the Judaeo-Christian tradition. Questions about the rationality or justification of religious commitment and the extent of compatibility with doubt look different (...)
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  37. Basic Problems of Philosophy Edited by Daniel J. Bronstein, Yervant H. Krikorian [and] Philip P. Wiener.Daniel J. Bronstein - 1964 - Prentice-Hall.
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  38.  21
    Leibniz on ‘Prophets’, Prophecy, and Revelation: DANIEL J. COOK.Daniel J. Cook - 2009 - Religious Studies 45 (3):269-287.
    During Leibniz's lifetime, interest in the interpretation of the Bible and biblical prophecy became central to the theological and political concerns of Protestant Europe. Leibniz's treatment of this phenomenon will be examined in the light of his views on the nature of revelation and its role in his defence of Christianity. It will be argued that Leibniz's defence of the miracle of revelation – unlike his arguments on behalf of the core Christian mysteries of the Trinity and Incarnation – is (...)
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  39. The Self: Elevated in Consciousness and Extended in Time.Daniel J. Povinelli - 2001 - In Chris Moore & Karen Lemmon (eds.), The Self in Time: Developmental Perspectives. Lawrence Erlbaum. pp. 75-95.
  40. Organisms ≠ Machines.Daniel J. Nicholson - 2013 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 44 (4):669-678.
    The machine conception of the organism (MCO) is one of the most pervasive notions in modern biology. However, it has not yet received much attention by philosophers of biology. The MCO has its origins in Cartesian natural philosophy, and it is based on the metaphorical redescription of the organism as a machine. In this paper I argue that although organisms and machines resemble each other in some basic respects, they are actually very different kinds of systems. I submit that the (...)
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  41.  48
    CEO International Assignment Experience and Corporate Social Performance.Daniel J. Slater & Heather R. Dixon-Fowler - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 89 (3):473-489.
    Research suggests that international assignment experience enhances awareness of societal stakeholders, influences personal values, and provides rare and valuable resources. Based on these arguments, we hypothesize that CEO international assignment experience will lead to increased corporate social performance (CSP) and will be moderated by the CEO's functional background. Using a sample of 393 CEOs of S&P 500 companies and three independent data sources, we find that CEO international assignment experience is positively related to CSP and is significantly moderated by the (...)
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  42. The Machine Conception of the Organism in Development and Evolution: A Critical Analysis.Daniel J. Nicholson - 2014 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 48:162-174.
    This article critically examines one of the most prevalent metaphors in modern biology, namely the machine conception of the organism (MCO). Although the fundamental differences between organisms and machines make the MCO an inadequate metaphor for conceptualizing living systems, many biologists and philosophers continue to draw upon the MCO or tacitly accept it as the standard model of the organism. This paper analyses the specific difficulties that arise when the MCO is invoked in the study of development and evolution. In (...)
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  43.  15
    Toward a Science of Other Minds: Escaping the Argument by Analogy.Daniel J. Povinelli, Jesse M. Bering & Steve Giambrone - 2000 - Cognitive Science 24 (3):509-541.
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  44.  58
    Inferring Other Minds: Failure of the Argument by Analogy.Daniel J. Povinelli & Steve Giambrone - 1999 - Philosophical Topics 27 (1):167-202.
  45.  17
    Morasses, Diamond, and Forcing.Daniel J. Velleman - 1982 - Annals of Mathematical Logic 23 (2):199.
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    Correction To: Rational Social and Political Polarization.Daniel J. Singer, Aaron Bramson, Patrick Grim, Bennett Holman, Jiin Jung, Karen Kovaka, Anika Ranginani & William J. Berger - 2019 - Philosophical Studies 176 (9):2269-2269.
    In the original publication of the article, the Acknowledgement section was inadvertently not included. The Acknowledgement is given in this Correction.
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  47. The Return of the Organism as a Fundamental Explanatory Concept in Biology.Daniel J. Nicholson - 2014 - Philosophy Compass 9 (5):347-359.
    Although it may seem like a truism to assert that biology is the science that studies organisms, during the second half of the twentieth century the organism category disappeared from biological theory. Over the past decade, however, biology has begun to witness the return of the organism as a fundamental explanatory concept. There are three major causes: (a) the realization that the Modern Synthesis does not provide a fully satisfactory understanding of evolution; (b) the growing awareness of the limits of (...)
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  48.  14
    On the Possibilities of Detecting Intentions Prior to Understanding Them.Daniel J. Povinelli - 2001 - In Bertram Malle, L. J. Moses & Dare Baldwin (eds.), Intentions and Intentionality: Foundations of Social Cognition. MIT Press. pp. 225--248.
  49.  53
    Explicit Pre-Training Instruction Does Not Improve Implicit Perceptual-Motor Sequence Learning.Daniel J. Sanchez & Paul J. Reber - 2013 - Cognition 126 (3):341-351.
  50.  23
    The Influence of Niels Bohr on Max Delbrück: Revisiting the Hopes Inspired by “Light and Life”.Daniel J. McKaughan - 2005 - Isis 96 (4):507-529.
    The impact of Niels Bohr’s 1932 “Light and Life” lecture on Max Delbrück’s lifelong search for a form of “complementarity” in biology is well documented and much discussed, but the precise nature of that influence remains subject to misunderstanding. The standard reading, which sees Delbrück’s transition from physics into biology as inspired by the hope that investigation of biological phenomena might lead to a breakthrough discovery of new laws of physics, is colored much more by Erwin Schrödinger’s What Is Life? (...)
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