Results for 'Daniel J. Whiting'

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Daniel Whiting
University of Southampton
  1.  7
    Daniel J. DiCenso and Rebecca Maloy, Eds., Chant, Liturgy, and the Inheritance of Rome: Essays in Honour of Joseph Dyer. London: Henry Bradshaw Society and Woodbridge, UK: Boydell, 2017. Pp. Xxiv, 572; Many Black-and-White Figures and Musical Examples, and 24 Tables. $99. ISBN: 978-1-907497-34-6.Table of Contents Available Online at Https://Boydellandbrewer.Com/Chant-Liturgy-and-the-Inheritance-of-Rome.Html. [REVIEW]Eleanor J. Giraud - 2020 - Speculum 95 (1):224-225.
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  2. Conservatives and Racists: Inferential Role Semantics and Pejoratives.Daniel J. Whiting - 2008 - Philosophia 36 (3):375-388.
    According to inferential role semantics, for any given expression to possess a particular meaning one must be disposed to make or, alternatively, acknowledge as correct certain inferential transitions involving it. As Williamson points out, pejoratives such as ‘Boche’ seem to provide a counter-example to IRS. Many speakers are neither disposed to use such expressions nor consider it proper to do so. But it does not follow, as IRS appears to entail, that such speakers do not understand pejoratives or that they (...)
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  3.  20
    ‘Black Pain is a White Commodity’: Moving Beyond Postcolonial Theory in Practical Theology: #CaesarMustFall!Daniel J. Louw - 2017 - Hts Theological Studies 73 (4):1-14.
    Postcolonialism and decolonising campaigns are expressions of human pain on the level of identity confusion, ideological abuse and structural oppression. The slogan ‘Black Pain is a White Commodity’ in the #MustFall campaigns is critically analysed within the framework of postcolonial theory and imperialistic power categories. The basic hypothesis of the article is that in early Christianity, pantokrator images of God were influenced by iconography stemming mostly from the Roman Emperor cult and Egyptian mythology. The power and dominiumship of God directly (...)
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  4. AUGUSTINE'S CONFESSIONS - (P.) White (Ed.) Augustine: Confessions Books V–IX. Pp. Xii + 358. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2019. Paper, £24.99, US$31.99 (Cased, £79.99, US$105). ISBN: 978-0-521-25351-2 (978-1-107-00959-2 Hbk). [REVIEW]Daniel J. Crosby - forthcoming - The Classical Review:1-3.
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  5.  29
    Bio Engagement: Making a Christian Difference Through Bioethics Today: Edited by N M de S Cameron, S E Daniels, B J White. William B Eerdmans Publishing Company, 2000, Pound14.99, Pp 265 + Xiii. ISBN 0-8028-4793-. [REVIEW]N. Fennemore - 2002 - Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (3):209-210.
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  6.  5
    Luisa Nardini, Interlacing Traditions: Neo-Gregorian Chant Propers in Beneventan Manuscripts. . Toronto: Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies, 2016. Pp. Xvi, 444; 15 Color Plates, 1 Black-and-White Figure, 1 Map, and Many Musical Examples and Tables. $100. ISBN: 978-0-88844-205-5. [REVIEW]Daniel J. DiCenso - 2019 - Speculum 94 (4):1199-1201.
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  7.  7
    Doxastic Normativity.Daniel J. Singer - 2013 - Dissertation, University of Michigan
    There is a puzzle about Hume's is-ought gap involving an epistemic `ought'. From the premise `Snow is white,' we can infer `Sophia's belief that snow is white is correct.' `Snow is white' is paradigmatically non-normative, and that Sophia's belief is correct, a claim about what belief she ought to have, seems to be normative. The argument seems valid, so the is-ought gap is supposed to block this kind of inference. The puzzle is over whether we should give up on the (...)
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  8.  18
    Cameron, Nigel M. De S., Scott E. Daniels, and Barbara J. White, Eds. Bioengagement: Making a Christian Difference Through Bioethics Today. [REVIEW]Scott B. Rae - 2001 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 1 (1):107-108.
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  9.  20
    Nonviolence and the Nightmare: King and Black Self-Defense.Daniel J. Ott - 2018 - American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 39 (1):64-73.
    I remember the first time that I heard James Cone's voice. A well-established, white scholar had just given what I thought to be a solid presentation on Martin Luther King Jr.'s notion of the "beloved community." When he had finished, Cone was one of the first to speak in the question and answer period. His strong tenor was piercing: "You can't talk about the dream, if you're not going to talk about the nightmare." He went on to clarify his worry (...)
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  10.  4
    Personal Reflections on Studying Royce After Curry.Daniel J. Brunson - 2021 - The Pluralist 16 (2):30-38.
    I studied Royce a bit as an undergraduate, and in graduate school, I took a course that included readings from Race Questions. Memory was, and is, an abiding interest of mine, and so I focused on that element of Royce’s thought—specifically, the community of memory and of hope in his Problem of Christianity. I suppose I had a naïve sense of Royce’s racism at the time—something along these lines: “Of course, a nineteenth-century white man was racist, but he was not (...)
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  11. Polarization and Belief Dynamics in the Black and White Communities: An Agent-Based Network Model From the Data.Patrick Grim, Stephen B. Thomas, Stephen Fisher, Christopher Reade, Daniel J. Singer, Mary A. Garza, Craig S. Fryer & Jamie Chatman - 2012 - In Christoph Adami, David M. Bryson, Charles Offria & Robert T. Pennock (eds.), Artificial Life 13. MIT Press.
    Public health care interventions—regarding vaccination, obesity, and HIV, for example—standardly take the form of information dissemination across a community. But information networks can vary importantly between different ethnic communities, as can levels of trust in information from different sources. We use data from the Greater Pittsburgh Random Household Health Survey to construct models of information networks for White and Black communities--models which reflect the degree of information contact between individuals, with degrees of trust in information from various sources correlated with (...)
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  12.  15
    Guyda Armstrong, Rhiannon Daniels, and Stephen J. Milner, Eds., The Cambridge Companion to Boccaccio. Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 2015. Pp. Xxxv, 256; 6 Black-and-White Figures. $84.99. ISBN: 978-1-107-01435-0.Table of Contents Available Online at Http://Www.Cambridge.Org/Us/Academic/Subjects/Literature/European-Literature/Cambridge-Companion-Boc caccio?Format=HB. [REVIEW]Janet Levarie Smarr - 2016 - Speculum 91 (4):1063-1065.
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  13. Truth: The Aim and Norm of Belief.Daniel Whiting - 2013 - Teorema: International Journal of Philosophy 32 (3):121-136.
    Invited contribution to The Aim of Belief, a special issue of Teorema, guest-edited by J. Zalabardo.
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  14.  16
    Alison Williams Lewin, Negotiating Survival: Florence and the Great Schism, 1378–1417. Madison and Teaneck, N.J.: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press; London: Associated University Presses, 2003. Pp. 283; Black-and-White Frontispiece and 1 Black-and-White Figure. $55.Daniel Williman - 2005 - Speculum 80 (4):1320-1321.
  15. Sharon Anderson-Gold, Unnecessary Evil. Albany, NY: State University of New York Press, 2000, 138 Pp.(Index). ISBN 0-7914-4820-7, $16.95 (Pb). Filippo Aureli and Frans BM De Waal, Eds., Natural Conflict Resolution. Berkeley, Calif.: University of California Press, 2000, 409 Pp.(Index). ISBN 0-520-22346-2, $24.95 (Pb). [REVIEW]Nigel M. De S. Cameron, Scott E. Daniels, Barbara J. White & Edward S. Casey - 2001 - Journal of Value Inquiry 35:587-590.
     
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  16. DFL 65.00. Dolan, B.(Ed.): 2000, Malthus, Medicine, & Morality:'Malthusianism'after 1798. Clio Medica 59. Amsterdam/Atlanta: Rodopi. 232 Pages. ISBN: 90-420-0841-5. Price: DFL 40.00. [REVIEW]N. M. De S. Cameron, S. E. Daniels & B. J. White - 2001 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 4 (115).
     
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  17. The Multidisciplinary Guidelines for Diagnosis and Referral in Cerebral Visual Impairment.Frouke N. Boonstra, Daniëlle G. M. Bosch, Christiaan J. A. Geldof, Catharina Stellingwerf & Giorgio Porro - 2022 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 16.
    IntroductionCerebral visual impairment is an important cause of visual impairment in western countries. Perinatal hypoxic-ischemic damage is the most frequent cause of CVI but CVI can also be the result of a genetic disorder. The majority of children with CVI have cerebral palsy and/or developmental delay. Early diagnosis is crucial; however, there is a need for consensus on evidence based diagnostic tools and referral criteria. The aim of this study is to develop guidelines for diagnosis and referral in CVI according (...)
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  18.  5
    Studies in Aristotle.Dominic J. O'Meara - 1981 - The Catholic University of America Press.
    From the Preface: -/- "The majority of the papers contained in this volume was delivered in the fall of 1978 at The Catholic University of America as part of the Machette series of lectures on Aristotle. Although collections of essays on Aristotle are hardly lacking at present, this volume presents new studies which, it is hoped, give some idea of the variety of philosophical perspectives in which Aristotle has held and continues to hold great interest and of the scholarly analysis (...)
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  19. Praise and Blame.Daniel J. Miller - 2022 - 1000-Word Philosophy.
    We praise people for morally good things: giving to charity, being generous, having compassion for the needy. We blame for morally bad things: cheating on one’s spouse, being selfish, harboring ill will towards others. What are praise and blame, though? When are they appropriate? This essay reviews influential answers to these questions.
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  20. Basic Problems of Philosophy Edited by Daniel J. Bronstein, Yervant H. Krikorian [and] Philip P. Wiener.Daniel J. Bronstein - 1964 - Prentice-Hall.
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  21.  21
    Leibniz on ‘Prophets’, Prophecy, and Revelation: DANIEL J. COOK.Daniel J. Cook - 2009 - Religious Studies 45 (3):269-287.
    During Leibniz's lifetime, interest in the interpretation of the Bible and biblical prophecy became central to the theological and political concerns of Protestant Europe. Leibniz's treatment of this phenomenon will be examined in the light of his views on the nature of revelation and its role in his defence of Christianity. It will be argued that Leibniz's defence of the miracle of revelation – unlike his arguments on behalf of the core Christian mysteries of the Trinity and Incarnation – is (...)
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  22. Rational Social and Political Polarization.Daniel J. Singer, Aaron Bramson, Patrick Grim, Bennett Holman, Jiin Jung, Karen Kovaka, Anika Ranginani & William J. Berger - 2019 - Philosophical Studies 176 (9):2243-2267.
    Public discussions of political and social issues are often characterized by deep and persistent polarization. In social psychology, it’s standard to treat belief polarization as the product of epistemic irrationality. In contrast, we argue that the persistent disagreement that grounds political and social polarization can be produced by epistemically rational agents, when those agents have limited cognitive resources. Using an agent-based model of group deliberation, we show that groups of deliberating agents using coherence-based strategies for managing their limited resources tend (...)
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  23.  3
    An Aims-Based Curriculum: The Significance of Human Flourishing for Schools.Michael J. Reiss & John White - 2013 - Institute of Education Press.
    An Aims-based Curriculum spells out a ground-breaking alternative to the familiar school curriculum constructed around a number of largely academic subjects. Its starting point is not subjects, but what schools should be for. It argues that aims are not to be seen as high-sounding principles that can be easily ignored: they are the lifeblood of everything a school does. -/- The book begins with general aims to do with equipping each learner to lead a personally fulfilling life, and to help (...)
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  24. Everything Flows: Towards a Processual Philosophy of Biology.Daniel J. Nicholson & John Dupré (eds.) - 2018 - Oxford University Press.
    This collection of essays explores the metaphysical thesis that the living world is not made up of substantial particles or things, as has often been assumed, but is rather constituted by processes. The biological domain is organised as an interdependent hierarchy of processes, which are stabilised and actively maintained at different timescales. Even entities that intuitively appear to be paradigms of things, such as organisms, are actually better understood as processes. Unlike previous attempts to articulate processual views of biology, which (...)
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  25. How to Be an Epistemic Consequentialist.Daniel J. Singer - 2018 - Philosophical Quarterly 68 (272):580-602.
    Epistemic consequentialists think that epistemic norms are about believing the truth and avoiding error. Recently, a number of authors have rejected epistemic consequentialism on the basis that it incorrectly sanctions tradeoffs of epistemic goodness. Here, I argue that epistemic consequentialists should borrow two lessons from ethical consequentialists to respond to these worries. Epistemic consequentialists should construe their view as an account of right belief, which they distinguish from other notions like rational and justified belief. Epistemic consequentialists should also make their (...)
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  26.  2
    Caring About Other People.Daniel J. Brunson - 2022 - The Pluralist 17 (2):8-12.
    during july 2020—eight months into the COVID-19 pandemic, and four months after the first US stay-at-home orders—a metaphorically viral quote misattributed to Dr. Anthony Fauci spread across social media: "I don't know how to explain to you that you should care about other people." This line encapsulated the frustration of those willing to sacrifice personal autonomy to limit the spread of COVID-19 and highlighted a consistent individualist tension in US culture.How consistent this tension is can be seen by tracing the (...)
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  27.  50
    Diversity, Not Randomness, Trumps Ability.Daniel J. Singer - 2019 - Philosophy of Science 86 (1):178-191.
    A number of formal models, including a highly influential model from Hong and Page, purport to show that functionally diverse groups often beat groups of individually high-performing agents in solving problems. Thompson argues that in Hong and Page’s model, that the diverse groups are created by a random process explains their success, not the diversity. Here, I defend the diversity interpretation of the Hong and Page result. The failure of Thompson’s argument shows that to understand the value of functional diversity, (...)
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  28. Gorillas in Our Midst: Sustained Inattentional Blindness for Dynamic Events.Daniel J. Simons & Christopher Chabris - 1999 - Perception 28 (9):1059-1074.
  29. Mind the Is-Ought Gap.Daniel J. Singer - 2015 - Journal of Philosophy 112 (4):193-210.
    The is-ought gap is Hume’s claim that we can’t get an ‘ought’ from just ‘is’s. Prior (“The Autonomy of Ethics,” 1960) showed that its most straightforward formulation, a staple of introductory philosophy classes, fails. Many authors attempt to resurrect the claim by restricting its domain syntactically or by reformulating it in terms of models of deontic logic. Those attempts prove to be complex, incomplete, or incorrect. I provide a simple reformulation of the is-ought gap that closely fits Hume’s description of (...)
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  30. The Concept of Mechanism in Biology.Daniel J. Nicholson - 2012 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 43 (1):152-163.
    The concept of mechanism in biology has three distinct meanings. It may refer to a philosophical thesis about the nature of life and biology (‘mechanicism’), to the internal workings of a machine-like structure (‘machine mechanism’), or to the causal explanation of a particular phenomenon (‘causal mechanism’). In this paper I trace the conceptual evolution of ‘mechanism’ in the history of biology, and I examine how the three meanings of this term have come to be featured in the philosophy of biology, (...)
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  31. What Epistemic Reasons Are For: Against the Belief-Sandwich Distinction.Daniel J. Singer & Sara Aronowitz - forthcoming - In Billy Dunaway & David Plunkett (eds.), Meaning, Decision, and Norms: Themes from the Work of Allan Gibbard.
    The standard view says that epistemic normativity is normativity of belief. If you’re an evidentialist, for example, you’ll think that all epistemic reasons are reasons to believe what your evidence supports. Here we present a line of argument that pushes back against this standard view. If the argument is right, there are epistemic reasons for things other than belief. The argument starts with evidentialist commitments and proceeds by a series of cases, each containing a reason. As the cases progress, the (...)
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  32.  66
    Permissible Epistemic Trade-Offs.Daniel J. Singer - 2019 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 97 (2):281-293.
    ABSTRACTRecent rejections of epistemic consequentialism, like those from Firth, Jenkins, Berker, and Greaves, have argued that consequentialism is committed to objectionable trade-offs and suggest...
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  33. Authentic Faith and Acknowledged Risk: Dissolving the Problem of Faith and Reason.Daniel J. McKaughan - 2013 - Religious Studies 49 (1):101-124.
    One challenge to the rationality of religious commitment has it that faith is unreasonable because it involves believing on insufficient evidence. However, this challenge and influential attempts to reply depend on assumptions about what it is to have faith that are open to question. I distinguish between three conceptions of faith each of which can claim some plausible grounding in the Judaeo-Christian tradition. Questions about the rationality or justification of religious commitment and the extent of compatibility with doubt look different (...)
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  34. Is the Cell Really a Machine?Daniel J. Nicholson - 2019 - Journal of Theoretical Biology 477:108–126.
    It has become customary to conceptualize the living cell as an intricate piece of machinery, different to a man-made machine only in terms of its superior complexity. This familiar understanding grounds the conviction that a cell's organization can be explained reductionistically, as well as the idea that its molecular pathways can be construed as deterministic circuits. The machine conception of the cell owes a great deal of its success to the methods traditionally used in molecular biology. However, the recent introduction (...)
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  35. A New Direction for Science and Values.Daniel J. Hicks - 2014 - Synthese 191 (14):3271-95.
    The controversy over the old ideal of “value-free science” has cooled significantly over the past decade. Many philosophers of science now agree that even ethical and political values may play a substantial role in all aspects of scientific inquiry. Consequently, in the last few years, work in science and values has become more specific: Which values may influence science, and in which ways? Or, how do we distinguish illegitimate from illegitimate kinds of influence? In this paper, I argue that this (...)
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  36. Change Blindness: Past, Present, and Future.Daniel J. Simons & Ronald A. Rensink - 2005 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (1):16-20.
    Change blindness is the striking failure to see large changes that normally would be noticed easily. Over the past decade this phenomenon has greatly contributed to our understanding of attention, perception, and even consciousness. The surprising extent of change blindness explains its broad appeal, but its counterintuitive nature has also engendered confusions about the kinds of inferences that legitimately follow from it. Here we discuss the legitimate and the erroneous inferences that have been drawn, and offer a set of requirements (...)
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  37. Change Blindness.Daniel J. Simons & Daniel T. Levin - 1997 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 1 (1):241-82.
  38. Neither Logical Empiricism nor Vitalism, but Organicism: What the Philosophy of Biology Was.Daniel J. Nicholson & Richard Gawne - 2015 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 37 (4):345-381.
    Philosophy of biology is often said to have emerged in the last third of the twentieth century. Prior to this time, it has been alleged that the only authors who engaged philosophically with the life sciences were either logical empiricists who sought to impose the explanatory ideals of the physical sciences onto biology, or vitalists who invoked mystical agencies in an attempt to ward off the threat of physicochemical reduction. These schools paid little attention to actual biological science, and as (...)
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  39.  48
    Chimpanzee Minds: Suspiciously Human?Daniel J. Povinelli & Jennifer Vonk - 2003 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (4):157-160.
  40. We Don't Need a Microscope to Explore the Chimpanzee's Mind.Daniel J. Povinelli & Jennifer Vonk - 2004 - Mind and Language 19 (1):1-28.
    The question of whether chimpanzees, like humans, reason about unobservable mental states remains highly controversial. On one account, chimpanzees are seen as possessing a psychological system for social cognition that represents and reasons about behaviors alone. A competing account allows that the chimpanzee's social cognition system additionally construes the behaviors it represents in terms of mental states. Because the range of behaviors that each of the two systems can generate is not currently known, and because the latter system depends upon (...)
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  41. Modern Liberty and its Discontents.Daniel J. Mahoney & Paul Seaton (eds.) - 1998 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    In this book, distinguished French philosopher Pierre Manent addresses a wide range of subjects, including the Machiavellian origins of modernity, Tocqueville's analysis of democracy, the political role of Christianity, the nature of totalitarianism, and the future of the nation-state. As a whole, the book constitutes a meditation on the nature of modern freedom and the permanent discontents which accompany it. Modern Liberty and its Discontents is both an important contribution to an understanding of modern society, and a significant contribution to (...)
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  42.  40
    Hellenistic Philosophy R. W. Sharples: Stoics, Epicureans and Sceptics: An Introduction to Hellenistic Philosophy . Pp. Xiv + 154. London and New York: Routledge, 1996. Cased, £30 (Paper, £10.99). ISBN: 0-415-11034-3 (0-415-11035-1 Pbk). [REVIEW]J. I. Daniel - 1999 - The Classical Review 49 (01):127-.
  43. We Don't Need a Microscope to Explore the Chimpanzee's Mind.Daniel J. Povinelli & Jennifer Vonk - 2006 - In Susan L. Hurley & Matthew Nudds (eds.), Rational Animals? Oxford University Press. pp. 1-28.
  44. Organisms ≠ Machines.Daniel J. Nicholson - 2013 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 44 (4):669-678.
    The machine conception of the organism (MCO) is one of the most pervasive notions in modern biology. However, it has not yet received much attention by philosophers of biology. The MCO has its origins in Cartesian natural philosophy, and it is based on the metaphorical redescription of the organism as a machine. In this paper I argue that although organisms and machines resemble each other in some basic respects, they are actually very different kinds of systems. I submit that the (...)
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  45. Reconceptualizing the Organism: From Complex Machine to Flowing Stream.Daniel J. Nicholson - 2018 - In Daniel J. Nicholson & John A. Dupre (eds.), Everything Flows: Towards a Processual Philosophy of Biology.
    This chapter draws on insights from non-equilibrium thermodynamics to demonstrate the ontological inadequacy of the machine conception of the organism. The thermodynamic character of living systems underlies the importance of metabolism and calls for the adoption of a processual view, exemplified by the Heraclitean metaphor of the stream of life. This alternative conception is explored in its various historical formulations and the extent to which it captures the nature of living systems is examined. Following this, the chapter considers the metaphysical (...)
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  46.  79
    Theorizing About Faith and Faithfulness with Jonathan Kvanvig.Daniel J. McKaughan & Daniel Howard-Snyder - 2021 - Religious Studies.
    What are faith and faithfulness, and how are they related? We consider two views that express very different answers to these questions. On our view, faith and faithfulness are distinct and yet complement each other. Faith is resilient reliance and faithfulness is resilient reliability, both of which involve conative and/or affective elements. In contrast, while Jonathan Kvanvig also holds that faith involves conative and/or affective elements, he identifies faith with a disposition to act in service of an ideal in the (...)
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  47. The Machine Conception of the Organism in Development and Evolution: A Critical Analysis.Daniel J. Nicholson - 2014 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 48:162-174.
    This article critically examines one of the most prevalent metaphors in modern biology, namely the machine conception of the organism (MCO). Although the fundamental differences between organisms and machines make the MCO an inadequate metaphor for conceptualizing living systems, many biologists and philosophers continue to draw upon the MCO or tacitly accept it as the standard model of the organism. This paper analyses the specific difficulties that arise when the MCO is invoked in the study of development and evolution. In (...)
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  48.  9
    Change Blindness.Daniel J. Simons & Daniel T. Levin - 1997 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 1 (7):261-267.
  49. The Return of the Organism as a Fundamental Explanatory Concept in Biology.Daniel J. Nicholson - 2014 - Philosophy Compass 9 (5):347-359.
    Although it may seem like a truism to assert that biology is the science that studies organisms, during the second half of the twentieth century the organism category disappeared from biological theory. Over the past decade, however, biology has begun to witness the return of the organism as a fundamental explanatory concept. There are three major causes: (a) the realization that the Modern Synthesis does not provide a fully satisfactory understanding of evolution; (b) the growing awareness of the limits of (...)
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  50.  35
    The Hebbian Paradigm Reintegrated: Local Reverberations as Internal Representations.Daniel J. Amit - 1995 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (4):617-626.
    The neurophysiological evidence from the Miyashita group's experiments on monkeys as well as cognitive experience common to us all suggests that local neuronal spike rate distributions might persist in the absence of their eliciting stimulus. In Hebb's cell-assembly theory, learning dynamics stabilize such self-maintaining reverberations. Quasi-quantitive modeling of the experimental data on internal representations in association-cortex modules identifies the reverberations as the internal code. This leads to cognitive and neurophysiological predictions, many following directly from the language used to describe the (...)
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