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Daniel Jacobson [35]Danielle S. Jacobson [1]
  1. The Moralistic Fallacy: On the ”Appropriateness' of Emotions.Daniel Jacobson - 2000 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 61 (1):65-90.
    Philosophers often call emotions appropriate or inappropriate. What is meant by such talk? In one sense, explicated in this paper, to call an emotion appropriate is to say that the emotion is fitting: it accurately presents its object as having certain evaluative features. For instance, envy might be thought appropriate when one’s rival has something good which one lacks. But someone might grant that a circumstance has these features, yet deny that envy is appropriate, on the grounds that it is (...)
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    The Moralistic Fallacy: On the 'Appropriateness' of Emotions.Justin D'Arms & Daniel Jacobson - 2000 - Philosophical and Phenomenological Research 61 (1):65-90.
    Philosophers often call emotions appropriate or inappropriate. What is meant by such talk? In one sense, explicated in this paper, to call an emotion appropriate is to say that the emotion is fitting: it accurately presents its object as having certain evaluative features. For instance, envy might be thought appropriate when one's rival has something good which one lacks. But someone might grant that a circumstance has these features, yet deny that envy is appropriate, on the grounds that it is (...)
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  3. Sentiment and Value.Justin D’Arms & Daniel Jacobson - 2000 - Ethics 110 (4):722-748.
  4. In Praise of Immoral Art.Daniel Jacobson - 1997 - Philosophical Topics 25 (1):155-199.
  5. Freedom of Speech Acts? A Response to Langton.Daniel Jacobson - 1995 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 24 (1):64-78.
  6. Seeing by Feeling: Virtues, Skills, and Moral Perception.Daniel Jacobson - 2005 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 8 (4):387-409.
    Champions of virtue ethics frequently appeal to moral perception: the notion that virtuous people can “see” what to do. According to a traditional account of virtue, the cultivation of proper feeling through imitation and habituation issues in a sensitivity to reasons to act. Thus, we learn to see what to do by coming to feel the demands of courage, kindness, and the like. But virtue ethics also claims superiority over other theories that adopt a perceptual moral epistemology, such as intuitionism (...)
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  7.  20
    The Moralistic Fallacy: On the ‘Appropriateness’ of Emotions.Justin D’Arms & Daniel Jacobson - 2000 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 61 (1):65-90.
    Philosophers often call emotions appropriate or inappropriate. What is meant by such talk? In one sense, explicated in this paper, to call an emotion appropriate is to say that the emotion is fitting: it accurately presents its object as having certain evaluative features. For instance, envy might be thought appropriate when one’s rival has something good which one lacks. But someone might grant that a circumstance has these features, yet deny that envy is appropriate, on the grounds that it is (...)
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  8. Fitting Attitude Theories of Value.Daniel Jacobson - 2011 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  9. Utilitarianism Without Consequentialism: The Case of John Stuart Mill.Daniel Jacobson - 2008 - Philosophical Review 117 (2):159-191.
    This essay argues, flouting paradox, that Mill was a utilitarian but not a consequentialist. First, it contends that there is logical space for a view that deserves to be called utilitarian despite its rejection of consequentialism; second, that this logical space is, in fact, occupied by John Stuart Mill. The key to understanding Mill's unorthodox utilitarianism and the role it plays in his moral philosophy is to appreciate his sentimentalist metaethics—especially his account of wrongness in terms of fitting guilt and (...)
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  10. Mill on Liberty, Speech, and the Free Society.Daniel Jacobson - 2000 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 29 (3):276-309.
  11. Ethical Criticism and the Vice of Moderation.Daniel Jacobson - 2005 - In Matthew Kieran (ed.), Contemporary Debates in Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Art. Blackwell. pp. 342--355.
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  12. Expressivism, Morality, and the Emotions.Justin D'Arms & Daniel Jacobson - 1994 - Ethics 104 (4):739-763.
  13. Wrong Kinds of Reason and the Opacity of Normative Force.Justin D’Arms & Daniel Jacobson - 2014 - In Oxford Studies in Metaethics. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 215-244.
     
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  14. Anthropocentric Constraints on Human Value.Daniel Jacobson & Justin D'Arms - 2006 - Oxford Studies in Metaethics 1:99-126.
    According to Cicero, “all emotions spring from the roots of error: they should not be pruned or clipped here and there, but yanked out” (Cicero 2002: 60). The Stoic enthusiasm for the extirpation of emotion is radical in two respects, both of which can be expressed with the claim that emotional responses are never appropriate. First, the Stoics held that emotions are incompatible with virtue , since the virtuous man will retain his equanimity whatever his fate. Grief is always vicious, (...)
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  15.  6
    Wrong Kinds of Reason and the Opacity of Normative Force.Justin D'Arms & Daniel Jacobson - 2014 - Oxford Studies in Metaethics 9.
    The literature on the wrong kind of reason problem largely assumes that such reasons pose only a theoretical problem for certain theories of value rather than a practical problem. Since the normative force of the canonical examples is obvious, the only difficulty is to identify what reasons of the right and wrong kind have in common without circularity. This chapter argues that in addition to the obvious WKRs on which the literature focuses, there are also more interesting WKRs that do (...)
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  16.  89
    Sir Philip Sidney's Dilemma: On the Ethical Function of Narrative Art.Daniel Jacobson - 1996 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 54 (4):327-336.
  17. Demystifying Sensibilities: Sentimental Values and the Instability of Affect.Justin D'Arms & Daniel Jacobson - 2010 - In Peter Goldie (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Emotion. Oxford University Press. pp. 585--613.
     
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  18. J.S. Mill and the Diversity of Utilitarianism.Daniel Jacobson - 2003 - Philosophers' Imprint 3:1-18.
    Mill's famous proportionality statement of the Greatest Happiness Principle (GHP) is commonly taken to specify his own moral theory. And the discussion in which GHP is embedded -- Chapter 2 of Utilitarianism -- predominates the interpretation of Mill's normative philosophy. Largely because of these suppositions, Mill is traditionally read as a particular kind of utilitarian: a maximizing act-consequentialist. This paper argues that the canonical status accorded to Utilitarianism is belied by the text itself, as well as by its historical context, (...)
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  19. Anthropocentric Constraints on Human Value.Daniel Jacobson & Justin D'Arms - 2006 - In Russ Shafer-Landau (ed.), Oxford Studies in Metaethics: Volume 1. Clarendon Press.
     
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  20.  45
    Speech and Action.Daniel Jacobson - 2001 - Legal Theory 7 (2):179-201.
    The fundamental tenet of the liberal conception of free speech is the principle of content neutrality, which Mill espoused in claiming that 1 On this view, the immorality, the falsity, and even the harmfulness of an opinion are not good reasons to censor it. s persuasion may be, not only of the falsity but of the pernicious consequenceslose their immunitys justification can be doubted. But I will not discuss these issues, on which there is already an immense literature, any further (...)
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  21. Regret and Irrational Action.Justin D. Arms & Daniel Jacobson - 2009 - In David Sobel & Steven Wall (eds.), Reasons for Action. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  22. Moral Psychology and Human Agency: Philosophical Essays on the Science of Ethics.Justin D'Arms & Daniel Jacobson (eds.) - 2014 - Oxford University Press.
    This volume examines the implications of developments in the science of ethics for philosophical theorizing about moral psychology and human agency. These ten new essays in empirically informed philosophy illuminate such topics as responsibility, the self, and the role in morality of mental states such as desire, emotion, and moral judgement.
     
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  23.  24
    Brink, David O. Mill’s Progressive Principles.Oxford: Clarendon, 2013. Pp. Xvii+307. $60.00.Daniel Jacobson - 2015 - Ethics 126 (1):204-210.
  24. Freedom of Speech : Why Freedom of Speech Includes Hate Speech.Daniel Jacobson - 2007 - In Jesper Ryberg, Thomas S. Petersen & Clark Wolf (eds.), New Waves in Applied Ethics. Palgrave-Macmillan.
     
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  25.  60
    Review of Berys Gaut, Art, Emotion and Ethics[REVIEW]Daniel Jacobson - 2008 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (3).
  26.  34
    Jerrold Levinson, Ed., Aesthetics and Ethics: Essays at the Intersection:Aesthetics and Ethics: Essays at the Intersection.Daniel Jacobson - 1999 - Ethics 110 (1):215-219.
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  27.  33
    Book Notes. [REVIEW]Emmett L. Bradbury, Anne W. Eaton, Sandra Jane Fairbanks, Jeffrey R. Flynn, Daniel Jacobson, Kenton F. Machina, Michael Pakaluk, Sebastian G. Rand, Lloyd Steffen & Patricia H. Werhane - 2002 - Ethics 113 (1):191-198.
  28.  42
    Book ReviewGeorgia Warnke,. Legitimate Differences: Interpretation in the Abortion Controversy and Other Public Debates. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1999. Pp. 214. $40.00. [REVIEW]Daniel Jacobson - 2001 - Ethics 111 (3):653-655.
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  29. Ethical Perspective: On Narrative Art and Moral Perception.Daniel Jacobson - 1994 - Dissertation, University of Michigan
    Horace recommended that poets "mingle the useful and the sweet"; but the champions of an ethical function for art have yet to explain how moral and aesthetic values can truly be mingled. Their proposed ethical functions too often seem irrelevant to what we most care about in art. Moreover, we need an explanation of what art has to show us that is of ethical significance, and that we don't already know. ;The answer is to be found in the "thick concepts" (...)
     
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  30. Mill.Daniel Jacobson - 2020 - Routledge.
     
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  31.  16
    Review: David O. Brink, Mill’s Progressive Principles. [REVIEW]Daniel Jacobson - 2015 - Ethics 126 (1):204-210.
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  32.  20
    Review of Henry R. West (Ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Mill's Utilitarianism[REVIEW]Daniel Jacobson - 2006 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (7).
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  33.  10
    Review of Robert Hinde, Why Good is Good: The Sources of Morality[REVIEW]Daniel Jacobson - 2002 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2002 (9).
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  34.  87
    The Academic Betrayal of Free Speech.Daniel Jacobson - 2004 - Social Philosophy and Policy 21 (2):48-80.
    “ 'Free speech' is just the name we give to verbal behavior that serves the substantive agendas we wish to advance”—or so literary theorist and professor of law Stanley Fish has claimed. This cynical dictum is one of several skeptical challenges to freedom of speech that have been extremely influential in the American academy. I will follow the skeptics' lead by distinguishing between two broad styles of critique: the progressive and the postmodern. Fish's dictum, however, like many of the bluntest (...)
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  35.  4
    Sensorimotor Control of Vocal Production in Early Childhood.Nichole E. Scheerer, Danielle S. Jacobson & Jeffery A. Jones - 2020 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 149 (6):1071-1077.
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  36.  30
    Book Notes. [REVIEW]Zed Adams, Daniel Farnham, Ian Farrell, Daniel Jacobson & Paul B. Thompson - 2006 - Ethics 116 (2):445-450.