Results for 'Daniel P. Nolan'

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Daniel Nolan
University of Notre Dame
  1. Stoic Gunk.Daniel P. Nolan - 2006 - Phronesis 51 (2):162-183.
    The surviving sources on the Stoic theory of division reveal that the Stoics, particularly Chrysippus, believed that bodies, places and times were such that all of their parts themselves had proper parts. That is, bodies, places and times were composed of gunk. This realisation helps solve some long-standing puzzles about the Stoic theory of mixture and the Stoic attitude to the present.
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  2. Chance and Necessity.Daniel Nolan - 2016 - Philosophical Perspectives 30 (1):294-308.
    A principle endorsed by many theories of objective chance, and practically forced on us by the standard interpretation of the Kolmogorov semantics for chance, is the principle that when a proposition P has a chance, any proposition Q that is necessarily equivalent to P will have the same chance as P. Call this principle SUB (for the substitution of necessary equivalents into chance ascriptions). I will present some problems for a theory of chance, and will argue that the best way (...)
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  3. What is Conscience and Why is Respect for It so Important?Daniel P. Sulmasy - 2008 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 29 (3):135-149.
    The literature on conscience in medicine has paid little attention to what is meant by the word ‘conscience.’ This article distinguishes between retrospective and prospective conscience, distinguishes synderesis from conscience, and argues against intuitionist views of conscience. Conscience is defined as having two interrelated parts: (1) a commitment to morality itself; to acting and choosing morally according to the best of one’s ability, and (2) the activity of judging that an act one has done or about which one is deliberating (...)
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  4.  48
    Tolerance, Professional Judgment, and the Discretionary Space of the Physician.Daniel P. Sulmasy - 2017 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 26 (1):18-31.
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  5.  7
    Whole-Brain Death and Integration: Realigning the Ontological Concept with Clinical Diagnostic Tests.Daniel P. Sulmasy - 2019 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 40 (5):455-481.
    For decades, physicians, philosophers, theologians, lawyers, and the public considered brain death a settled issue. However, a series of recent cases in which individuals were declared brain dead yet physiologically maintained for prolonged periods of time has challenged the status quo. This signals a need for deeper reflection and reexamination of the underlying philosophical, scientific, and clinical issues at stake in defining death. In this paper, I consider four levels of philosophical inquiry regarding death: the ontological basis, actual states of (...)
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  6.  28
    Conscience, Tolerance, and Pluralism in Health Care.Daniel P. Sulmasy - 2019 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 40 (6):507-521.
    Increasingly, physicians are being asked to provide technical services that many believe are morally wrong or inconsistent with their beliefs about the meaning and purposes of medicine. This controversy has sparked persistent debate over whether practitioners should be permitted to decline participation in a variety of legal practices, most notably physician-assisted suicide and abortion. These debates have become heavily politicized, and some of the key words and phrases are being used without a clear understanding of their meaning. In this essay, (...)
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  7.  53
    The Varieties of Human Dignity: A Logical and Conceptual Analysis.Daniel P. Sulmasy - 2013 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (4):937-944.
    The word ‘dignity’ is used in a variety of ways in bioethics, and this ambiguity has led some to argue that the term must be expunged from the bioethical lexicon. Such a judgment is far too hasty, however. In this article, the various uses of the word are classified into three serviceable categories: intrinsic, attributed, and inflorescent dignity. It is then demonstrated that, logically and linguistically, the attributed and inflorescent meanings of the word presuppose the intrinsic meaning. Thus, one cannot (...)
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  8. Dignity and Bioethics : History, Theory, and Selected Applications.Daniel P. Sulmasy - 2008 - In Adam Schulman (ed.), Human Dignity and Bioethics: Essays Commissioned by the President's Council on Bioethics. [President's Council on Bioethics.
     
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  9.  63
    “Reinventing” the Rule of Double Effect.Daniel P. Sulmasy - 2007 - In Bonnie Steinbock (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Bioethics. Oxford University Press. pp. 114--49.
    The Rule of Double Effect has played an important role in bioethics, especially during the last fifty years. Its major application in bioethics has been in providing physicians who are opposed to euthanasia with a moral justification for using opioid analgesics in treating the pain of patients whose death might thereby be hastened. It has also prominently been applied to certain obstetric cases. The scope of application of double effect is actually much broader than medical ethics, extending to cover such (...)
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  10.  13
    The Invention of Athens.Daniel P. Tompkins & Nicole Loraux - 1988 - History and Theory 27 (3):306.
  11. Speaking of the Value of Life.Daniel P. Sulmasy - 2011 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 21 (2):181-199.
    The notion of the value of life is often invoked in discussions regarding medical care for the sick and the dying. This theme has figured in arguments about medical ethics for decades, but many of the phrases associated with this concept have received little serious scrutiny. It is true that some philosophers have declared a few commonly used phrases such as “the sanctity of life,” “the infinite value of life,” and “the value of life itself” to be unclear at best (...)
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  12.  76
    Diseases and Natural Kinds.Daniel P. Sulmasy - 2005 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 26 (6):487-513.
    David Thomasma called for the development of a medical ethics based squarely on the philosophy of medicine. He recognized, however, that widespread anti-essentialism presented a significant barrier to such an approach. The aim of this article is to introduce a theory that challenges these anti-essentialist objections. The notion of natural kinds presents a modest form of essentialism that can serve as the basis for a foundationalist philosophy of medicine. The notion of a natural kind is neither static nor reductionistic. Disease (...)
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  13.  63
    Killing and Allowing to Die: Another Look.Daniel P. Sulmasy - 1998 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 26 (1):55-64.
    One of the most important questions in the debate over the morality of euthanasia and assisted suicide is whether an important distinction between killing patients and allowing them to die exists. The U.S. Supreme Court, in rejecting challenges to the constitutionality of laws prohibiting physician-assisted suicide, explicitly invoked this distinction, but did not explicate or defend it. The Second Circuit of the U.S. Court of Appeals had previously asserted, also without argument, that no meaningful distinction exists between killing and allowing (...)
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  14.  19
    Christian Witness in Health Care.Daniel P. Sulmasy - 2016 - Christian Bioethics 22 (1):45-61.
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  15.  23
    Edmund Pellegrino's Philosophy and Ethics of Medicine: An Overview.Daniel P. Sulmasy - 2014 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 24 (2):105-112.
    Pellegrino was there at the beginning of the field. In the 1950s and 60s, before there was a Kennedy Institute of Ethics or a Hastings Center; before the word ‘bioethics’ itself was coined, Pellegrino was writing articles such as "Ethical Considerations in the Practice of Medicine and Nursing," published in 1964. He was among those who started the Society for Health and Human Values—a precursor organization to the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities. He was the founding editor of the (...)
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  16. Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy: Volume Iii.Daniel Garber & Steven Nadler (eds.) - 2006 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Table of Contents Note from the Editors 1. Deflating Descartes’ Causal Axiom, Tad Schmaltz 2. The Dustbin Theory of Mind: A Cartesian Legacy?, Lawrence Nolan and John Whipple 3. Is Descartes a Libertarian?, C. P. Ragland 4. The Scholastic Resources for Descartes’ Concept of God as Causa Sui, Richard Lee 5. Hobbesian Mechanics, Doug Jesseph 6. Locks, Schlocks, and Poisoned Peas: Boyle on Actual and Dispositive Qualities, Dan Kaufman 7. Atomism, Monism, and Causation in the Natural Philosophy of Margaret (...)
     
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  17.  12
    The Development of Children's Regret and Relief.Daniel P. Weisberg & Sarah R. Beck - 2012 - Cognition and Emotion 26 (5):820-835.
  18.  65
    What is an Oath and Why Should a Physician Swear One?Daniel P. Sulmasy - 1999 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 20 (4):329-346.
    While there has been much discussion about the role of oaths in medical ethics, this discussion has previously centered on the content of various oaths. Little conceptual work has been done to clarify what an oath is, or to show how an oath differs from a promise or a code of ethics, or to explore what general role oath-taking by physicians might play in medical ethics. Oaths, like promises, are performative utterances. But oaths are generally characterized by their greater moral (...)
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  19.  87
    Deliberative Democracy and Stem Cell Research in New York State: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly.Daniel P. Sulmasy - 2009 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 19 (1):pp. 63-78.
    Many states in the U.S. have adopted policies regarding human embryonic stem cell (hESC) research in the last few years. Some have arrived at these policies through legislative debate, some by referendum, and some by executive order. New York has chosen a unique structure for addressing policy decisions regarding this morally controversial issue by creating the Empire State Stem Cell Board with two Committees—an Ethics Committee and a Funding Committee. This essay explores the pros and cons of various policy arrangements (...)
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  20.  91
    Commentary: Double Effect—Intention is the Solution, Not the Problem.Daniel P. Sulmasy - 2000 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 28 (1):26-29.
  21. Death, Dignity, and the Theory of Value.Daniel P. Sulmasy - 2002 - Ethical Perspectives 9 (2):103-130.
    The word ‘dignity’ arises continuously in the debate over euthanasia and assisted suicide, both in Europe and in North America. Unlike the phrases ‘autonomy’ and ‘slippery slope’, ‘dignity’ is used by those on both sides of the question. For example, the organizations most prominently associated with the campaign that culminated in the recent legalization of euthanasia in Belgium are the Association pour la Droit de Mourir dans la Dignité and Recht op Waardig Sterven. Yet when Belgium passed its euthanasia law, (...)
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  22.  44
    Terri Schiavo and the Roman Catholic Tradition of Forgoing Extraordinary Means of Care.Daniel P. Sulmasy - 2005 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 33 (2):359-362.
    Media coverage and statements by various Catholic spokespersons regarding the case of Terri Schiavo has generated enormous and deeply unfortunate confusion regarding Church teaching about the use of life-sustaining treatments. Two weeks ago, for example, I received a letter from the superior of a community of Missionary Sisters of Charity, who operate a hospice here in the United States The Missionary Sisters of Charity are the community founded by Mother Theresa, the 20th Century saint whose primary ministry was to rescue (...)
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  23.  22
    Death and Dignity in Catholic Christian Thought.Daniel P. Sulmasy - 2017 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 20 (4):537-543.
    This article traces the history of the concept of dignity in Western thought, arguing that it became a formal Catholic theological concept only in the late nineteenth century. Three uses of the word are distinguished: intrinsic, attributed, and inflorescent dignity, of which, it is argued, the intrinsic conception is foundational. The moral norms associated with respect for intrinsic dignity are discussed briefly. The scriptural and theological bases for adopting the concept of dignity as a Christian idea are elucidated. The article (...)
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  24.  26
    Dear Dr. Peabody.Daniel P. Sulmasy - 2016 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 59 (4):562-566.
    Francis W. Peabody, MDDepartment of MedicineBoston City Hospital and Harvard Medical SchoolBoston, MassachusettsMarch 19, 2017Dear Dr. Peabody,Thank you for giving us the opportunity to review your manuscript "The Care of the Patient." It has been carefully considered by the editors and two external reviewers. We regret to inform you that it cannot be considered further for publication in the Prestigious Journal of Medicine.Chief among our reasons is that it is overly long. Opinion pieces—especially non-data driven articles about topics like ethics—should (...)
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  25.  6
    Darwin's Malthusian Metaphor and Russian Evolutionary Thought, 1859-1917.Daniel P. Todes - 1987 - Isis 78 (4):537-551.
  26. What's so Special About Medicine?Daniel P. Sulmasy - 1993 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 14 (1):379-380.
    Health care has increasingly come to be understood as a commodity. The ethical implications of such an understanding are significant. The author argues that health care is not a commodity because health care (1) is non-proprietary, (2) serves the needs of persons who, as patients, are uniquely vulnerable, (3) essentially involves a special human relationship which ought not be bought or sold, (4) helps to define what is meant by necessity and cannot be considered a commodity when subjected to rigorous (...)
     
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  27. Impossible Worlds: A Modest Approach.Daniel Nolan - 1997 - Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 38 (4):535-572.
    Reasoning about situations we take to be impossible is useful for a variety of theoretical purposes. Furthermore, using a device of impossible worlds when reasoning about the impossible is useful in the same sorts of ways that the device of possible worlds is useful when reasoning about the possible. This paper discusses some of the uses of impossible worlds and argues that commitment to them can and should be had without great metaphysical or logical cost. The paper then provides an (...)
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  28. Hyperintensional Metaphysics.Daniel Nolan - 2014 - Philosophical Studies 171 (1):149-160.
    In the last few decades of the twentieth century there was a revolution in metaphysics: the intensional revolution. Many metaphysicians rejected the doctrine, associated with Quine and Davidson, that extensional analyses and theoretical resources were the only acceptable ones. Metaphysicians embraced tools like modal and counterfactual analyses, claims of modal and counterfactual dependence, and entities such as possible worlds and intensionally individuated properties and relations. The twenty-first century is seeing a hypterintensional revolution. Theoretical tools in common use carve more finely (...)
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  29. Emergency Contraception for Women Who Have Been Raped: Must Catholics Test for Ovulation, or is Testing for Pregnancy Morally Sufficient?Daniel P. Sulmasy - 2006 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 16 (4):305-331.
    : On the grounds that rape is an act of violence, not a natural act of intercourse, Roman Catholic teaching traditionally has permitted women who have been raped to take steps to prevent pregnancy, while consistently prohibiting abortion even in the case of rape. Recent scientific evidence that emergency contraception (EC) works primarily by preventing ovulation, not by preventing implantation or by aborting implanted embryos, has led Church authorities to permit the use of EC drugs in the setting of rape. (...)
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  30.  54
    Science, Pseudoscience, and Science Falsely So-CaIIed.Daniel P. Thurs & Ronald L. Numbers - 2013 - In Massimo Pigliucci & Maarten Boudry (eds.), Philosophy of Pseudoscience: Reconsidering the Demarcation Problem. University of Chicago Press. pp. 121.
    This chapter presents a historical analysis of pseudoscience, tracking down the coinage and currency of the term and explaining its shifting meaning in tandem with the emerging historical identity of science. The discussions cover the invention of pseudoscience; science and pseudoscience in the late nineteenth century; pseudoscience in the new century; and pseudoscience and its critics in the late twentieth century.
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  31.  40
    Futility and the Varieties of Medical Judgment.Daniel P. Sulmasy - 1997 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 18 (1-2):63-78.
    Pellegrino has argued that end-of-life decisions should be based upon the physician's assessment of the effectiveness of the treatment and the patient's assessment of its benefits and burdens. This would seem to imply that conditions for medical futility could be met either if there were a judgment of ineffectiveness, or if the patient were in a state in which he or she were incapable of a subjective judgment of the benefits and burdens of the treatment. I argue that a theory (...)
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  32.  56
    The Logos of the Genome: Genomes as Parts of Organisms.Daniel P. Sulmasy - 2006 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 27 (6):535-540.
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  33.  10
    On Substituted Arguments.Daniel P. Sulmasy & Lois Snyder Sulmasy - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (9):732-733.
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  34. The Social Brain in Psychiatric and Neurological Disorders.Daniel P. Kennedy & Ralph Adolphs - 2012 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 16 (11):559-572.
    Psychiatric and neurological disorders have historically provided key insights into the structure-function rela- tionships that subserve human social cognition and behavior, informing the concept of the ‘social brain’. In this review, we take stock of the current status of this concept, retaining a focus on disorders that impact social behavior. We discuss how the social brain, social cognition, and social behavior are interdependent, and emphasize the important role of development and com- pensation. We suggest that the social brain, and its (...)
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  35.  8
    Daniel Beer. Renovating Russia: The Human Sciences and the Fate of Liberal Modernity, 1880–1930. Ix + 229 Pp., Bibl., Index. Ithaca, N.Y./London: Cornell University Press, 2008. $45. [REVIEW]Daniel P. Todes - 2009 - Isis 100 (3):664-665.
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  36.  10
    No Poetry From the Past: The Archaeology of Moses Finley’s Ancestral Constitution.Daniel P. Tompkins - 2014 - American Journal of Philology 135 (2):205-219.
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  37.  5
    Pavlov's Physiology Factory.Daniel P. Todes - 1997 - Isis 88 (2):205-246.
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  38. Impossible Worlds.Daniel Nolan - 2013 - Philosophy Compass 8 (4):360-372.
    Philosophers have found postulating possible worlds to be very useful in a number of areas, including philosophy of language and mind, logic, and metaphysics. Impossible worlds are a natural extension to this use of possible worlds, and can help resolve a number of difficulties thrown up by possible‐worlds frameworks.
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  39.  23
    Macklin, Ruth. Against Relativism: Cultural Diversity and the Search for Ethical Universals in Medicine.Daniel P. Sulmasy - 2001 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 1 (3):467-469.
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  40.  35
    David Lewis.Daniel Nolan - 2005 - Mcgill-Queen's University Press.
    David Lewis's work is of fundamental importance in many areas of philosophical inquiry and there are few areas of Anglo-American philosophy where his impact has not been felt. Lewis's philosophy also has a rare unity: his views form a comprehensive philosophical system, answering a broad range of questions in metaphysics, philosophy of mind, philosophy of language, philosophy of action and many other areas. This breadth of Lewis's work, however, has meant that it is difficult to know where to start in (...)
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  41. Catholic Health Care: Not Dead Yet.Daniel P. Sulmasy - 2001 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 1 (1):41-50.
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  42. Rawls and Environmental Ethics.Daniel P. Thero - 1995 - Environmental Ethics 17 (1):93-106.
    The original position contractarian model of ethical reasoning put forth by John Rawls has been examined as a basis for an environmental ethic on three previous occasions in this journal and in Peter Wenz’s Environmental Justice. In this article, I critically examine each of these treatments, analyzing the proposals offered and identifying their shortcomings. I find a total of seven different proposals in this literature for modifying Rawls’ theory to augment its adequacy or as a ground environmental ethics. The diverse (...)
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  43.  20
    Developing and Measuring the Impact of an Accounting Ethics Course That is Based on the Moral Philosophy of Adam Smith.Daniel P. Sorensen, Scott E. Miller & Kevin L. Cabe - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 140 (1):175-191.
    Accounting ethics failures have seized headlines and cost investors billions of dollars. Improvement of the ethical reasoning and behavior of accountants has become a key concern for the accounting profession and for higher education in accounting. Researchers have asked a number of questions, including what type of accounting ethics education intervention would be most effective for accounting students. Some researchers have proposed virtue ethics as an appropriate moral framework for accounting. This research tested whether Smithian virtue ethics training, based on (...)
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  44.  6
    Karl Barth’s Epistemology: A Critical Appraisal.Daniël P. Veldsman - 2007 - Hts Theological Studies 63 (4).
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  45.  46
    Beyond the Genome: Community-Level Analysis of the Microbial World.Iratxe Zarraonaindia, Daniel P. Smith & Jack A. Gilbert - 2013 - Biology and Philosophy 28 (2):261-282.
    The development of culture-independent strategies to study microbial diversity and function has led to a revolution in microbial ecology, enabling us to address fundamental questions about the distribution of microbes and their influence on Earth’s biogeochemical cycles. This article discusses some of the progress that scientists have made with the use of so-called “omic” techniques (metagenomics, metatranscriptomics, and metaproteomics) and the limitations and major challenges these approaches are currently facing. These ‘omic methods have been used to describe the taxonomic structure (...)
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  46.  76
    Crossing the Bridge: A Time of Transition for Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics.Daniel P. Sulmasy - 2002 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 23 (1):5-7.
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  47.  6
    Sternberg's Sketchy Theory: Defining Details Desired.Daniel P. Keating - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (4):595-596.
  48.  26
    Patients' Perceptions of the Quality of Informed Consent for Common Medical Procedures.Daniel P. Sulmasy, Lisa S. Lehmann, David M. Levine & R. R. Raden - 1994 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 5 (3):189.
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  49.  53
    Patient Expectations of Benefit From Phase I Clinical Trials: Linguistic Considerations in Diagnosing a Therapeutic Misconception.K. P. Weinfurt, Daniel P. Sulmasy, Kevin A. Schulman & Neal J. Meropol - 2003 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 24 (4):329-344.
    The ethical treatment of cancer patientsparticipating in clinical trials requiresthat patients are well-informed about thepotential benefits and risks associated withparticipation. When patients enrolled in phaseI clinical trials report that their chance ofbenefit is very high, this is often taken as evidence of a failure of the informed consent process. We argue, however, that some simple themes from the philosophy of language may make such a conclusion less certain. First, the patient may receive conflicting statements from multiple speakers about the expected (...)
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  50. Conditionals and Curry.Daniel Nolan - 2016 - Philosophical Studies 173 (10):2629-2647.
    Curry's paradox for "if.. then.." concerns the paradoxical features of sentences of the form "If this very sentence is true, then 2+2=5". Standard inference principles lead us to the conclusion that such conditionals have true consequents: so, for example, 2+2=5 after all. There has been a lot of technical work done on formal options for blocking Curry paradoxes while only compromising a little on the various central principles of logic and meaning that are under threat. -/- Once we have a (...)
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