Results for 'Daniel P. Thurs'

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  1.  60
    Science, Pseudoscience, and Science Falsely So-CaIIed.Daniel P. Thurs & Ronald L. Numbers - 2013 - In Massimo Pigliucci & Maarten Boudry (eds.), Philosophy of Pseudoscience: Reconsidering the Demarcation Problem. University of Chicago Press. pp. 121.
    This chapter presents a historical analysis of pseudoscience, tracking down the coinage and currency of the term and explaining its shifting meaning in tandem with the emerging historical identity of science. The discussions cover the invention of pseudoscience; science and pseudoscience in the late nineteenth century; pseudoscience in the new century; and pseudoscience and its critics in the late twentieth century.
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  2.  13
    Daniel Patrick Thurs. Science Talk: Changing Notions of Science in American Popular Culture. X + 237 Pp., Index. Piscataway, N.J.: Rutgers University Press, 2007. $44.95. [REVIEW]A. Bowdoin Van Riper - 2008 - Isis 99 (2):435-436.
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  3. What is Conscience and Why is Respect for It so Important?Daniel P. Sulmasy - 2008 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 29 (3):135-149.
    The literature on conscience in medicine has paid little attention to what is meant by the word ‘conscience.’ This article distinguishes between retrospective and prospective conscience, distinguishes synderesis from conscience, and argues against intuitionist views of conscience. Conscience is defined as having two interrelated parts: (1) a commitment to morality itself; to acting and choosing morally according to the best of one’s ability, and (2) the activity of judging that an act one has done or about which one is deliberating (...)
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  4. Stoic Gunk.Daniel P. Nolan - 2006 - Phronesis 51 (2):162-183.
    The surviving sources on the Stoic theory of division reveal that the Stoics, particularly Chrysippus, believed that bodies, places and times were such that all of their parts themselves had proper parts. That is, bodies, places and times were composed of gunk. This realisation helps solve some long-standing puzzles about the Stoic theory of mixture and the Stoic attitude to the present.
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  5.  56
    The Varieties of Human Dignity: A Logical and Conceptual Analysis.Daniel P. Sulmasy - 2013 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (4):937-944.
    The word ‘dignity’ is used in a variety of ways in bioethics, and this ambiguity has led some to argue that the term must be expunged from the bioethical lexicon. Such a judgment is far too hasty, however. In this article, the various uses of the word are classified into three serviceable categories: intrinsic, attributed, and inflorescent dignity. It is then demonstrated that, logically and linguistically, the attributed and inflorescent meanings of the word presuppose the intrinsic meaning. Thus, one cannot (...)
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  6.  51
    Tolerance, Professional Judgment, and the Discretionary Space of the Physician.Daniel P. Sulmasy - 2017 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 26 (1):18-31.
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  7.  68
    “Reinventing” the Rule of Double Effect.Daniel P. Sulmasy - 2007 - In Bonnie Steinbock (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Bioethics. Oxford University Press. pp. 114--49.
    The Rule of Double Effect has played an important role in bioethics, especially during the last fifty years. Its major application in bioethics has been in providing physicians who are opposed to euthanasia with a moral justification for using opioid analgesics in treating the pain of patients whose death might thereby be hastened. It has also prominently been applied to certain obstetric cases. The scope of application of double effect is actually much broader than medical ethics, extending to cover such (...)
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  8. The Social Brain in Psychiatric and Neurological Disorders.Daniel P. Kennedy & Ralph Adolphs - 2012 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 16 (11):559-572.
    Psychiatric and neurological disorders have historically provided key insights into the structure-function rela- tionships that subserve human social cognition and behavior, informing the concept of the ‘social brain’. In this review, we take stock of the current status of this concept, retaining a focus on disorders that impact social behavior. We discuss how the social brain, social cognition, and social behavior are interdependent, and emphasize the important role of development and com- pensation. We suggest that the social brain, and its (...)
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  9.  25
    Defending Biodiversity: Environmental Science and Ethics Jonathan A.Newman, Gary Varner and Stefan Linquist, 2017 Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, Xiv + 441 P.; £36.99. [REVIEW]Daniel P. Faith - 2019 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 36 (4):688-690.
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  10.  46
    Critical Pedagogy and Attentive Love.Daniel P. Liston - 2008 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 27 (5):387-392.
  11.  67
    Killing and Allowing to Die: Another Look.Daniel P. Sulmasy - 1998 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 26 (1):55-64.
    One of the most important questions in the debate over the morality of euthanasia and assisted suicide is whether an important distinction between killing patients and allowing them to die exists. The U.S. Supreme Court, in rejecting challenges to the constitutionality of laws prohibiting physician-assisted suicide, explicitly invoked this distinction, but did not explicate or defend it. The Second Circuit of the U.S. Court of Appeals had previously asserted, also without argument, that no meaningful distinction exists between killing and allowing (...)
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  12.  10
    Daniel Beer. Renovating Russia: The Human Sciences and the Fate of Liberal Modernity, 1880–1930. Ix + 229 Pp., Bibl., Index. Ithaca, N.Y./London: Cornell University Press, 2008. $45. [REVIEW]Daniel P. Todes - 2009 - Isis 100 (3):664-665.
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  13.  11
    Whole-Brain Death and Integration: Realigning the Ontological Concept with Clinical Diagnostic Tests.Daniel P. Sulmasy - 2019 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 40 (5):455-481.
    For decades, physicians, philosophers, theologians, lawyers, and the public considered brain death a settled issue. However, a series of recent cases in which individuals were declared brain dead yet physiologically maintained for prolonged periods of time has challenged the status quo. This signals a need for deeper reflection and reexamination of the underlying philosophical, scientific, and clinical issues at stake in defining death. In this paper, I consider four levels of philosophical inquiry regarding death: the ontological basis, actual states of (...)
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  14.  22
    Developing and Measuring the Impact of an Accounting Ethics Course That is Based on the Moral Philosophy of Adam Smith.Daniel P. Sorensen, Scott E. Miller & Kevin L. Cabe - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 140 (1):175-191.
    Accounting ethics failures have seized headlines and cost investors billions of dollars. Improvement of the ethical reasoning and behavior of accountants has become a key concern for the accounting profession and for higher education in accounting. Researchers have asked a number of questions, including what type of accounting ethics education intervention would be most effective for accounting students. Some researchers have proposed virtue ethics as an appropriate moral framework for accounting. This research tested whether Smithian virtue ethics training, based on (...)
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  15. Dignity and Bioethics : History, Theory, and Selected Applications.Daniel P. Sulmasy - 2008 - In Adam Schulman (ed.), Human Dignity and Bioethics: Essays Commissioned by the President's Council on Bioethics. [President's Council on Bioethics.
     
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  16.  28
    Conscience, Tolerance, and Pluralism in Health Care.Daniel P. Sulmasy - 2019 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 40 (6):507-521.
    Increasingly, physicians are being asked to provide technical services that many believe are morally wrong or inconsistent with their beliefs about the meaning and purposes of medicine. This controversy has sparked persistent debate over whether practitioners should be permitted to decline participation in a variety of legal practices, most notably physician-assisted suicide and abortion. These debates have become heavily politicized, and some of the key words and phrases are being used without a clear understanding of their meaning. In this essay, (...)
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  17.  6
    Sternberg's Sketchy Theory: Defining Details Desired.Daniel P. Keating - 1980 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (4):595-596.
  18.  93
    Commentary: Double Effect—Intention is the Solution, Not the Problem.Daniel P. Sulmasy - 2000 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 28 (1):26-29.
  19.  14
    The Invention of Athens.Daniel P. Tompkins & Nicole Loraux - 1988 - History and Theory 27 (3):306.
  20.  48
    Terri Schiavo and the Roman Catholic Tradition of Forgoing Extraordinary Means of Care.Daniel P. Sulmasy - 2005 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 33 (2):359-362.
    Media coverage and statements by various Catholic spokespersons regarding the case of Terri Schiavo has generated enormous and deeply unfortunate confusion regarding Church teaching about the use of life-sustaining treatments. Two weeks ago, for example, I received a letter from the superior of a community of Missionary Sisters of Charity, who operate a hospice here in the United States The Missionary Sisters of Charity are the community founded by Mother Theresa, the 20th Century saint whose primary ministry was to rescue (...)
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  21.  23
    Death and Dignity in Catholic Christian Thought.Daniel P. Sulmasy - 2017 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 20 (4):537-543.
    This article traces the history of the concept of dignity in Western thought, arguing that it became a formal Catholic theological concept only in the late nineteenth century. Three uses of the word are distinguished: intrinsic, attributed, and inflorescent dignity, of which, it is argued, the intrinsic conception is foundational. The moral norms associated with respect for intrinsic dignity are discussed briefly. The scriptural and theological bases for adopting the concept of dignity as a Christian idea are elucidated. The article (...)
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  22.  28
    Should Institutions Disclose the Names of Employees with Covid‐19?Daniel P. Sulmasy & Robert M. Veatch - 2020 - Hastings Center Report 50 (3):25-27.
  23.  65
    What is an Oath and Why Should a Physician Swear One?Daniel P. Sulmasy - 1999 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 20 (4):329-346.
    While there has been much discussion about the role of oaths in medical ethics, this discussion has previously centered on the content of various oaths. Little conceptual work has been done to clarify what an oath is, or to show how an oath differs from a promise or a code of ethics, or to explore what general role oath-taking by physicians might play in medical ethics. Oaths, like promises, are performative utterances. But oaths are generally characterized by their greater moral (...)
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  24. Speaking of the Value of Life.Daniel P. Sulmasy - 2011 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 21 (2):181-199.
    The notion of the value of life is often invoked in discussions regarding medical care for the sick and the dying. This theme has figured in arguments about medical ethics for decades, but many of the phrases associated with this concept have received little serious scrutiny. It is true that some philosophers have declared a few commonly used phrases such as “the sanctity of life,” “the infinite value of life,” and “the value of life itself” to be unclear at best (...)
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  25.  78
    Diseases and Natural Kinds.Daniel P. Sulmasy - 2005 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 26 (6):487-513.
    David Thomasma called for the development of a medical ethics based squarely on the philosophy of medicine. He recognized, however, that widespread anti-essentialism presented a significant barrier to such an approach. The aim of this article is to introduce a theory that challenges these anti-essentialist objections. The notion of natural kinds presents a modest form of essentialism that can serve as the basis for a foundationalist philosophy of medicine. The notion of a natural kind is neither static nor reductionistic. Disease (...)
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  26.  23
    Edmund Pellegrino's Philosophy and Ethics of Medicine: An Overview.Daniel P. Sulmasy - 2014 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 24 (2):105-112.
    Pellegrino was there at the beginning of the field. In the 1950s and 60s, before there was a Kennedy Institute of Ethics or a Hastings Center; before the word ‘bioethics’ itself was coined, Pellegrino was writing articles such as "Ethical Considerations in the Practice of Medicine and Nursing," published in 1964. He was among those who started the Society for Health and Human Values—a precursor organization to the American Society for Bioethics and Humanities. He was the founding editor of the (...)
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  27.  12
    The Development of Children's Regret and Relief.Daniel P. Weisberg & Sarah R. Beck - 2012 - Cognition and Emotion 26 (5):820-835.
  28.  22
    Christian Witness in Health Care.Daniel P. Sulmasy - 2016 - Christian Bioethics 22 (1):45-61.
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  29.  6
    Neo‐Marxism and Schooling.Daniel P. Liston - 2015 - Educational Theory 65 (3):239-243.
  30.  89
    Deliberative Democracy and Stem Cell Research in New York State: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly.Daniel P. Sulmasy - 2009 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 19 (1):pp. 63-78.
    Many states in the U.S. have adopted policies regarding human embryonic stem cell (hESC) research in the last few years. Some have arrived at these policies through legislative debate, some by referendum, and some by executive order. New York has chosen a unique structure for addressing policy decisions regarding this morally controversial issue by creating the Empire State Stem Cell Board with two Committees—an Ethics Committee and a Funding Committee. This essay explores the pros and cons of various policy arrangements (...)
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  31.  5
    Correction to: Whole-brain death and integration: realigning the ontological concept with clinical diagnostic tests.Daniel P. Sulmasy - 2020 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 41 (5):281-282.
    My article, “Whole-brain death and integration: Realigning the ontological concept with clinical diagnostic tests”.
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  32.  11
    Deconstructing Anthropocentric Privilege: Imago Dei and Nonhuman Agency.Daniel P. Horan - 2019 - Heythrop Journal 60 (4):560-570.
  33.  16
    Human Embryos, Human Beings: A Scientific and Philosophical Approach by Samuel B. Condic and Maureen L. Condic. [REVIEW]Daniel P. Maher - 2020 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 20 (1):184-188.
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  34.  1
    Self-Categorization and Autism: Exploring the Relationship Between Autistic Traits and Group Homogeneity.Daniel P. Skorich, Lila M. Cassidy, Kia S. Karimi & S. Alexander Haslam - forthcoming - Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied.
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  35.  13
    Unlike Diamonds, Defibrillators Aren’T Forever: Why It Is Sometimes Ethical to Deactivate Cardiac Implantable Electrical Devices.Daniel P. Sulmasy & Mariele A. Courtois - 2019 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 28 (2):338-346.
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  36. A questão do livre-arbítrio em John R. Searle: uma contraposição do naturalismo biológico ao fisicalismo e ao funcionalismo.Daniel P. Nunes & Everaldo Cescon - 2015 - Cognitio-Estudos 12 (2):179-190.
    This paper compares the theses of physicalism and functionalism – particularly the computacionalist line – with the biological naturalism of John Searle regarding the possibility of free will. In such contrast, each line is decomposed into its statements so that they can be reviewed. It is argued that the searlean biological naturalism can explain more than the other two philosophies on how free action can have the source of its motivation in what is external to the mental state that makes (...)
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  37. Death, Dignity, and the Theory of Value.Daniel P. Sulmasy - 2002 - Ethical Perspectives 9 (2):103-130.
    The word ‘dignity’ arises continuously in the debate over euthanasia and assisted suicide, both in Europe and in North America. Unlike the phrases ‘autonomy’ and ‘slippery slope’, ‘dignity’ is used by those on both sides of the question. For example, the organizations most prominently associated with the campaign that culminated in the recent legalization of euthanasia in Belgium are the Association pour la Droit de Mourir dans la Dignité and Recht op Waardig Sterven. Yet when Belgium passed its euthanasia law, (...)
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  38.  7
    Darwin's Malthusian Metaphor and Russian Evolutionary Thought, 1859-1917.Daniel P. Todes - 1987 - Isis 78 (4):537-551.
  39.  15
    Tandem Androgenic and Psychological Shifts in Male Reproductive Effort Following a Manipulated “Win” or “Loss” in a Sporting Competition.Daniel P. Longman, Michele K. Surbey, Jay T. Stock & Jonathan C. K. Wells - 2018 - Human Nature 29 (3):283-310.
    Male-male competition is involved in inter- and intrasexual selection, with both endocrine and psychological factors presumably contributing to reproductive success in human males. We examined relationships among men’s naturally occurring testosterone, their self-perceived mate value, self-esteem, sociosexuality, and expected likelihood of approaching attractive women versus situations leading to child involvement. We then monitored changes in these measures in male rowers from Cambridge, UK, following a manipulated “win” or “loss” as a result of an indoor rowing contest. Baseline results revealed that (...)
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  40.  16
    The Possibility of Practical Reason.Daniel P. Maher - 2002 - International Philosophical Quarterly 42 (3):415-417.
  41.  24
    Discourse or Moral Action? A Critique of Postmodernism.Landon E. Beyer & Daniel P. Listen - 1992 - Educational Theory 42 (4):371-393.
  42.  11
    Richard A. Lee Jr., The Thought of Matter: Materialism, Conceptuality, and the Transcendence of Immanence.Daniel P. Pepe - 2017 - Philosophy Today 61 (3):775-784.
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  43.  22
    How Original Was Scotus on the Incarnation? Reconsidering the History of the Absolute Predestination of Christ in Light of Robert Grosseteste.Daniel P. Horan - 2011 - Heythrop Journal 52 (3):374 - 391.
  44.  16
    Love and Despair in Teaching.Daniel P. Liston - 2000 - Educational Theory 50 (1):81-102.
  45. Artificial Nutrition and Hydration and Care at the End of Life.Daniel P. Sulmasy - 2021 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 21 (3):453-482.
    New Natural Law Theory and the Catholic medico-moral tradition often lead to similar conclusions in hard cases regarding end-of-life care. Considering the provision of artificial nutrition and hydration to patients suffering from post-coma unresponsive wakefulness, however, brings to light subtle ways in which NNL differs from the centuries-old natural law tradition. In this essay, I formalize the methodology embedded within the casuistry of the medico-moral tradition and show how it differs from NNL with respect to the role played by double-effect (...)
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  46. What's so Special About Medicine?Daniel P. Sulmasy - 1993 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 14 (1):379-380.
    Health care has increasingly come to be understood as a commodity. The ethical implications of such an understanding are significant. The author argues that health care is not a commodity because health care (1) is non-proprietary, (2) serves the needs of persons who, as patients, are uniquely vulnerable, (3) essentially involves a special human relationship which ought not be bought or sold, (4) helps to define what is meant by necessity and cannot be considered a commodity when subjected to rigorous (...)
     
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  47.  5
    Pavlov's Physiology Factory.Daniel P. Todes - 1997 - Isis 88 (2):205-246.
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  48.  5
    Civil Rights: Prisoners' Right to Treatment Information Under Pabon V. Wright.Daniel P. Wilansky - 2006 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 34 (4):831-832.
    In Pabon v. Wright, the Second Circuit held that the Fourteenth Amendment right to refuse medical treatment contained a corollary right to the information necessary to make an informed decision. Plaintiff, William Pabon, was an inmate at Green Haven Correctional Facility in New York. He named two groups of defendants: his doctors and nurses at Green Haven and his doctors at Dutchess Gastroenterologists, P.C..In October 1996, a laboratory test indicated that Plaintiff may have contracted Hepatitis C. The Green Haven doctors (...)
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  49.  26
    Dear Dr. Peabody.Daniel P. Sulmasy - 2016 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 59 (4):562-566.
    Francis W. Peabody, MDDepartment of MedicineBoston City Hospital and Harvard Medical SchoolBoston, MassachusettsMarch 19, 2017Dear Dr. Peabody,Thank you for giving us the opportunity to review your manuscript "The Care of the Patient." It has been carefully considered by the editors and two external reviewers. We regret to inform you that it cannot be considered further for publication in the Prestigious Journal of Medicine.Chief among our reasons is that it is overly long. Opinion pieces—especially non-data driven articles about topics like ethics—should (...)
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  50.  7
    Recent Developments in Health Law: Civil Rights: Prisoners’ Right to Treatment Information Under Pabon V. Wright.Daniel P. Wilansky - 2006 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 34 (4):831-832.
    In Pabon v. Wright, the Second Circuit held that the Fourteenth Amendment right to refuse medical treatment contained a corollary right to the information necessary to make an informed decision. Plaintiff, William Pabon, was an inmate at Green Haven Correctional Facility in New York. He named two groups of defendants: his doctors and nurses at Green Haven and his doctors at Dutchess Gastroenterologists, P.C..In October 1996, a laboratory test indicated that Plaintiff may have contracted Hepatitis C. The Green Haven doctors (...)
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