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Daniel Putman [30]Daniel A. Putman [14]
  1.  13
    A Reply to 'Scepticism About the Virtue Ethics Approach to Nursing Ethics' by Stephen Holland: The Relevance of Virtue in Nursing Ethics.Daniel A. Putman - 2012 - Nursing Philosophy 13 (2):142-145.
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  2.  63
    The Emotions of Courage.Daniel Putman - 2001 - Journal of Social Philosophy 32 (4):463–470.
  3.  29
    Equivocating the Ad Hominem.Daniel Putman - 2010 - Philosophy 85 (4):551-555.
    Christopher Johnson argued in 'Reconsidering the Ad Hominem' that, in certain exceptional cases, appealing to ad hominem considerations is logically justifiable. My argument is that ad hominem considerations are no different than other evidential considerations. The evidential links may be strong, weak or nonexistent but there is nothing special in itself about considering ad hominem factors when weighing evidence. Like all the informal fallacies, simply because a claim has the signature of being 'ad hominem' does not make it irrelevant. The (...)
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  4.  16
    The Intellectual Bias of Virtue Ethics.Daniel Putman - 1997 - Philosophy 72 (280):303 - 311.
  5.  32
    Psychological Courage.Daniel Putman - 1997 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 4 (1):1-11.
  6.  30
    Was Andrew Carnegie Generous?Daniel Putman - 2010 - Think 9 (26):91-98.
    Millions of Americans, as well as millions in Europe, have used or will use a library established by Andrew Carnegie. In his lifetime Carnegie gave the equivalent of several billion dollars in today's money to establish 1,689 public libraries in the United States, Hawaii and Puerto Rico. Moreover, 660 libraries in Britain and Ireland, 125 in Canada, 17 in New Zealand, 12 in South Africa and scattered others around the world exist because of this man. 1 And this does not (...)
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  7.  74
    The Aesthetic Relation of Musical Performer and Audience.Daniel Putman - 1990 - British Journal of Aesthetics 30 (4):361-366.
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  8.  10
    Natural Kinds and Human Artifacts.Daniel A. Putman - 1982 - Mind 91 (363):418-419.
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  9.  11
    Relational Ethics and Virtue Theory.Daniel Putman - 1991 - Metaphilosophy 22 (3):231-238.
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  10.  20
    Self-Deception and the Teaching of Philosophy.Daniel Putman - 1987 - Teaching Philosophy 10 (3):189-199.
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  11.  19
    Christian B. Miller, Moral Character: An Empirical Theory. Reviewed By.Daniel Putman - 2015 - Philosophy in Review 35 (4):217-219.
    Christian Miller's book makes extensive use of the data on human behavior and motivation from psychological studies in the last 50-60 years and applies that information to the analysis of character. The book begins with helping behavior and the analysis is then generalized to other character traits. Miller argues that an analysis of human character as having Mixed Character Traits is superior to the analysis of character using the traditional virtues. The review highlights the great value of combining the research (...)
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  12.  19
    Virtue Theory and the Self.Daniel Putman - 1998 - Teaching Philosophy 21 (2):153-162.
    It is well-observed that undergraduate students frequently profess ethical relativism, but they also frequently defend ethical egoism. The author suggests four reasons why ethical egoism is so common among undergraduates: since college students’ identity is in flux, a normative framework in which the self may be appealed to as a foundation for value offers a sense of security; most college students have relatively few obligations beyond themselves; media and advertising tend to promote and reward egoism; egoism is easy and affords (...)
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  13.  50
    Why Instrumental Music has No Shame.Daniel A. Putman - 1987 - British Journal of Aesthetics 27 (1):55-61.
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  14.  8
    Virtue Theory and the Self: Thoughts on Addressing Ethical Egoism in Our Students.Daniel Putman - 1998 - Teaching Philosophy 21 (2):153-162.
    It is well-observed that undergraduate students frequently profess ethical relativism, but they also frequently defend ethical egoism. The author suggests four reasons why ethical egoism is so common among undergraduates: since college students’ identity is in flux, a normative framework in which the self may be appealed to as a foundation for value offers a sense of security; most college students have relatively few obligations beyond themselves; media and advertising tend to promote and reward egoism; egoism is easy and affords (...)
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  15.  9
    Integrity and Moral Development.Daniel Putman - 1996 - Journal of Value Inquiry 30 (1-2):237-246.
  16.  20
    Sophomore Seminars in Two-Year Colleges.Daniel A. Putman - 1981 - Teaching Philosophy 4 (2):151-158.
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  17.  15
    Virtue and the Practice of Modern Medicine.Daniel A. Putman - 1988 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 13 (4):433-443.
    Robert Veatch has claimed that virtue theory is not only irrelevant but potentially dangerous in medical ethics. I argue that virtue is a far more prominent factor in contemporary medical practice than Veatch admits. Even if ‘stranger medicine’ is taken as the norm, proper conduct on the part of physicians depends on certain character traits in order to be maintained consistently over a long period of time and in situations which run counter to the physician's own interests. Right conduct, which (...)
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  18.  7
    In Defence of Aristotelian Honour.Daniel Putman - 1995 - Philosophy 70 (272):286 - 288.
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  19.  28
    Normative Ethics.Daniel Putman - 1999 - Teaching Philosophy 22 (3):308-310.
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  20.  13
    Music and the Metaphor of Touch.Daniel A. Putman - 1985 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 44 (1):59-66.
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  21.  22
    Virtue Theory in Ethics Courses.Daniel Putman - 1992 - Teaching Philosophy 15 (1):51-56.
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  22.  24
    Virtue and Self-Deception.Daniel A. Putman - 1987 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 25 (4):549-557.
    Self-Deception has traditionally been discussed in the literature in utilitarian terms. I argue in this paper that, As a defect of character, Self-Deception can be understood much more clearly using the concepts of virtue theory. I apply macintyre's distinction between internal and external goods and his discussion about the unity of a life-Narrative to self-Deception. The result is to clarify why self-Deception is a vice and when it might be justified on utilitarian grounds.
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  23.  7
    Rights and Virtues: Toward an Integrated Theory. [REVIEW]Daniel A. Putman - 1987 - Journal of Value Inquiry 21 (2):87-99.
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  24.  8
    Christopher W. Gowans. Buddhist Moral Philosophy: An Introduction. Reviewed By.Daniel Putman - 2015 - Philosophy in Review 35 (5):264-266.
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  25.  18
    The Primacy of Virtue in Children's Moral Development.Daniel Putman - 1995 - Journal of Moral Education 24 (2):175-183.
    Abstract The concept of levels of moral maturity in psychology focuses on character formation in children's development. Virtue theory in ethics, with its concern for character, can be helpful in pointing out the ethical implications of much of the current work with children. This paper ties together several concepts in virtue theory with the current information on children's moral development. The paper argues for the usefulness of some very ancient ethical concepts.
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  26.  22
    Egoism and Virtue.Daniel Putman - 1992 - Journal of Value Inquiry 26 (1):117-124.
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  27.  14
    The Compatibility of Justice and Kindness.Daniel Putman - 1990 - Philosophy 65 (254):516 - 517.
    In ‘Virtue and Character’ A. D. M. Walker claims that kindness and justice are incompatible in certain important ways and that a person can be kind or just without possessing the other virtue. Walker argues that virtues must lead to ‘effective and intelligent action’ and that a virtue ceases to exist if ‘it leads to violation of the minimal requirements of any other virtue’. On this view kindness and justice function independently to produce effective action. Kindness requires a direct caring (...)
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  28.  12
    Doubting, Thinking, and Possible Worlds.Daniel A. Putman - 1983 - Philosophy Research Archives 9:337-346.
    Kripke has noted that possible worlds are stipulated, not discovered, and that the stipulation of these worlds allows us to separate accidental from essential properties. In this paper I argue that possible worlds theory gives us an important tool for analyzing what Descartes is doing in the Meditations. The first Meditation becomes a thought experiment in which possible realities are stipulated in a search for one or more essential properties. Viewing the doubt in this manner sheds new light on the (...)
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  29.  11
    Ethical Decisions and Contrary-to-Fact Conditionals.Daniel A. Putman - 1985 - Review of Metaphysics 39 (1):47 - 55.
  30.  12
    Can a Secularist Appreciate Religious Music?Daniel Putman - 2008 - Philosophy 83 (3):391-395.
    David Pugmire has argued that secularists can genuinely appreciate religious music because of our imaginative powers combined with the 'Platonic' nature of the emotions expressed in such music. I argue that Pugmire is wrong on both counts. Religious music is 'Platonic' not because it is subject to levels of imagination but because it has a definite object which makes imaginative readings inferior. Moreover, since religious music does have a clear object taken by the believer as real, a gap exists that (...)
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  31.  2
    Doubting, Thinking, and Possible Worlds.Daniel A. Putman - 1983 - Philosophy Research Archives 9:337-346.
    Kripke has noted that possible worlds are stipulated, not discovered, and that the stipulation of these worlds allows us to separate accidental from essential properties. In this paper I argue that possible worlds theory gives us an important tool for analyzing what Descartes is doing in the Meditations. The first Meditation becomes a thought experiment in which possible realities are stipulated in a search for one or more essential properties. Viewing the doubt in this manner sheds new light on the (...)
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  32.  8
    Tragedy and Nonhumans.Daniel Putman - 1989 - Environmental Ethics 11 (4):345-353.
    The concept of tragedy has been central to much of human history; yet, twentieth-century philosophers have done little to analyze what tragedy means outside of the theater. Utilizing a framework from MacIntyre’s After Virtue, I first discuss what tragedy is for human beings and some of its ethical implications. Then I analyze how we use the concept with regard to nonhumans. Although the typical application of the concept to animals is thoroughly anthropocentric, I argue first that the concept of tragedy (...)
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  33.  6
    Sympathy and Ethical Judgments: A Reconsideration.Daniel Putman - 1987 - American Philosophical Quarterly 24 (3):261 - 266.
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  34.  5
    What Exactly Is the Good of Self-Deception?Daniel A. Putman - 1996 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 10 (2):17-23.
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  35.  3
    Virtue and Politics: The Example of Philip Hart.Michael O'Brien & Daniel Putman - 1998 - Public Affairs Quarterly 12 (2):169-178.
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  36.  1
    A Reply to ‘Scepticism About the Virtue Ethics Approach to Nursing Ethics’ by Stephen Holland: The Relevance of Virtue in Nursing Ethics.Daniel A. Putman - 2012 - Nursing Philosophy 13 (2):142-145.
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  37.  1
    Tragedy and Nonhumans.Daniel Putman - 1989 - Environmental Ethics 11 (4):345-353.
    The concept of tragedy has been central to much of human history; yet, twentieth-century philosophers have done little to analyze what tragedy means outside of the theater. Utilizing a framework from MacIntyre’s After Virtue, I first discuss what tragedy is for human beings and some of its ethical implications. Then I analyze how we use the concept with regard to nonhumans. Although the typical application of the concept to animals is thoroughly anthropocentric, I argue first that the concept of tragedy (...)
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  38.  1
    Kent Anderson 1943 - 1984.Daniel Putman - 1984 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 58 (1):87 -.
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  39.  1
    Some Distinctions on the Role of Metaphor in Music.Daniel Putman - 1989 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 23 (2):103.
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  40.  2
    The Recognition of Rights in Everyday Life.Daniel Putman - 1987 - Journal of Social Philosophy 18 (3):32-42.
    Gewirth has argued that rights are justified by their role in the “generic features” of action. Simply by virtue of being a purposive agent capable of voluntary action, one must accept the logic that all persons with such characteristics have certain moral rights. But the language of rights theories does not deal with the process by which rights are acknowledged. How do we go about recognizing those characteristics of human life that underlie the logic Gewirth claims is necessary? By what (...)
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  41. Pojman on the Religious Foundation of Ethics: A Rejoinder.Daniel Putman - 1995 - Journal of Social Philosophy 26 (2):94-98.
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  42. Human Excellence: Dialogues on Virtue Theory.Daniel A. Putman - 1998 - Upa.
    Human Excellence introduces the basic ideas of virtue theory, the branch of ethics that analyzes character. The author accomplishes this by systematically and carefully exploring the role of character in ethics through a series of dialogues. He begins by contrasting virtue ethics with other ethical views such as egoism, utilitarianism, and rights theories. Then he explores issues including the nature of courage, the problem of healthy versus unhealthy self-love, character and parenting techniques, the nature of friendship, and the relationship of (...)
     
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  43. Music and Empathy.Daniel Putman - 1994 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 28 (2):98.
  44. Natural and Empty Desires: An Epicurean View of Musical Experience.Daniel Putman - 2005 - Contemporary Aesthetics 3.
     
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