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  1.  68
    Food Sovereignty, Urban Food Access, and Food Activism: Contemplating the Connections Through Examples From Chicago. [REVIEW]Daniel R. Block, Noel Chávez, Erika Allen & Dinah Ramirez - 2012 - Agriculture and Human Values 29 (2):203-215.
    The idea of food sovereignty has its roots primarily in the response of small producers in developing countries to decreasing levels of control over land, production practices, and food access. While the concerns of urban Chicagoans struggling with low food access may seem far from these issues, the authors believe that the ideas associated with food sovereignty will lead to the construction of solutions to what is often called the “food desert” issue that serve and empower communities in ways that (...)
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  2.  40
    Engagement for Transformation: Value Webs for Local Food System Development. [REVIEW]Daniel R. Block, Michael Thompson, Jill Euken, Toni Liquori, Frank Fear & Sherill Baldwin - 2008 - Agriculture and Human Values 25 (3):379-388.
    Engagement happens when academics and non-academics form partnerships to create mutual understanding, and then take action together. An example is the “value web” work associated with W. K. Kellogg Foundation’s Food Systems Higher Education–Community Partnership. Partners nationally work on local food systems development by building value webs. “Value chains,” a concept with considerable currency in the private sector, involves creating non-hierarchical relationships among otherwise disparate actors and entities to achieve collective common goals. The value web concept is extended herein by (...)
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  3.  26
    Taking Food and Agriculture Studies to the Streets: Community Engagement, Working Across Disciplines, and Community Change. [REVIEW]Daniel R. Block - 2010 - Agriculture and Human Values 27 (4):519-524.
    One of the most attractive aspects of food and agricultural studies for scholars is the level of public interest in the subjects of our research. Such interest means that food and agriculture scholars often become public scholars, asked to comment on issues of great interest to the public. In addition, food and agriculture scholars often have the opportunity to partner more directly with community organizations to perform community-based research. Such studies take many forms, but community members often take a lead (...)
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